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60Grit
05-21-2008, 10:32 PM
What is a chemical application that will kill Kudzu to the root/tuber, and still be able to plant the same ground?

60Grit
05-21-2008, 10:39 PM
I've got about an acre of Kudzu on my property, and another 2 or 3 on joining property.

I don't know the legality of me spraying there's, but there has to be something I can do to spray mine.

dawg2
05-21-2008, 10:41 PM
I saw a special on "Kudzu" a few years back and GA Power had something they were using, but I do not recall the chemical. Maybe call them? I know it can have a taproot as deep as 16feet!!! That is the problem.

60Grit
05-21-2008, 10:43 PM
I saw a special on "Kudzu" a few years back and GA Power had something they were using, but I do not recall the chemical. Maybe call them? I know it can have a taproot as deep as 16feet!!! That is the problem.

I didn't think any plant rooted that deep?? Not even trees!!

That is a problem.

I have tried Roundup Pro and it just laughs at it...:banginghe

whitetails#1
05-21-2008, 10:47 PM
What is a chemical application that will kill Kudzu to the root/tuber, and still be able to plant the same ground?

They don't make one::smash:Find that chemical and you'll be a millionaire.:rofl:

60Grit
05-21-2008, 10:54 PM
My brother n law says roundup with diesel fuel works.

My question there is, why waste the roundup, wouldn't just the diesel fuel work by itself??

But that still wouldn't allow me to replant afterwards..

whitetails#1
05-21-2008, 10:59 PM
My brother n law says roundup with diesel fuel works.

My question there is, why waste the roundup, wouldn't just the diesel fuel work by itself??

But that still wouldn't allow me to replant afterwards..

I bow hunt in a 5 acre kudzu field. Early season while its green. I've tried for years to kill it :banginghe to make my own food plots. I have found NOTHING that will kill that stuff. I'll be wathing this thread hope someone can tell us something, because i hate it!:banginghe

60Grit
05-21-2008, 11:01 PM
I bow hunt in a 5 acre kudzu field. Early season while its green. I've tried for years to kill it :banginghe to make my own food plots. I have found NOTHING that will kill that stuff. I'll be wathing this thread hope someone can tell us something, because i hate it!:banginghe

Mine is just starting to try and get into my pines, which is a constant battle. I was thinking of getting it bush hogged first and then spraying the new growth. :huh:

Nautical Son
05-21-2008, 11:12 PM
My uncle(a bored individual) had it on his fenceline he managed to bushhog and hand remove it and it hasn't returned as far as I know.

Mind you this is a man that also hand dug the silt from his pond 4.5 acres with a wheelbarrow and a shovel 2-3 ft deep in places. He has plenty of "spare"time to work on projects such as this, for fear of having to spend a dollar.

P.S. Disclaimer
And David if you read this you know your dad will pinch a penny till Lincoln screams.

60Grit
05-21-2008, 11:15 PM
My uncle(a bored individual) had it on his fenceline he managed to bushhog and hand remove it and it hasn't returned as far as I know.

Mind you this is a man that also hand dug the silt from his pond 4.5 acres with a wheelbarrow and a shovel 2-3 ft deep in places. He has plenty of "spare"time to work on projects such as this, for fear of having to spend a dollar.

P.S. Disclaimer
And David if you read this you know your dad will pinch a penny till Lincoln screams.

Obviously he didn't dig 16ft. deep to get the root, so that must be a myth.

I find it hard to believe that there is not a commercially available chemical that can be sprayed on this stuff, and not contaminate the soil.

whitetails#1
05-21-2008, 11:22 PM
[QUOTE=60Grit;2206125]Obviously he didn't dig 16ft. deep to get the root, so that must be a myth.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I have used round up it kills it but it always comes back.:banginghe

60Grit
05-21-2008, 11:24 PM
[quote=60Grit;2206125]Obviously he didn't dig 16ft. deep to get the root, so that must be a myth.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I have used round up it kills it but it always comes back.:banginghe

That is the results I get. But I would consider that a burn, not a kill.

What I want is a permenant solution.

Milkman
05-22-2008, 07:30 AM
I have heard that if it is grazed to the point of not allowing enough growth to get sufficient sunlight it will die within a couple of years.

I think the person who told me that used goats as the grazers.

dawg2
05-22-2008, 07:41 AM
I have heard that if it is grazed to the point of not allowing enough growth to get sufficient sunlight it will die within a couple of years.

I think the person who told me that used goats as the grazers.

I have also heard hogs.

ellaville hunter
05-22-2008, 07:42 AM
transline will kill it

dawg2
05-22-2008, 07:43 AM
Check out this website:

http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/exotic/vegman/fifteen.htm

transline will kill it

Transline is one of the listed herbicides in the link above.

From the link:
Transline (clopyralid), from DowElanco, is readily absorbed by foliage and roots and is translocated throughout the plant. This herbicide is targeted to three plant families: legumes, smartweeds and composites. At 21 ounces per acre, Transline has the benefit that it may be used near trees, grasses and dicots, other than the three target families, without damaging them. Transline has not proven effective in eradicating older infestations of kudzu, but may be helpful in treating young patches and in controlling the spread of older plants.

ellaville hunter
05-22-2008, 07:57 AM
milestone will work also

Vernon Holt
05-22-2008, 08:33 AM
I eliminated a Kudzu patch on my place that had been established more than 50 years.

I purchased a 5 gallon back pack sprayer (Solo brand). I used Garlon 4 herbicide for the first treatment, following label instructions. Mixed dye in the solution so as to assure full and complete coverage.

One year later the patch was dead except for an occasional green spot which was recovering. Applied a second treatment with Roundup. Two or three years later I discovered a half dozen single sprouts which were subsequently treated with Roundup.

My house now sits in the middle of this patch. I have shrubs, flowers, and trees, and zero kudzu.

If you use a Restricted Use Herbicide you must have an applicators license to purchase and to apply. You can go by your County Extension Office where they will allow you to watch a video and thus qualify for the license. They will issue you the license. This is the procedure in my County.

Do not mix diesel fuel with your herbicide. It will burn the foliage and will interfere with the folar uptake of the leaves.

Do not use a soil active herbicide (absorbed by roots) if you have trees in the area which you do not wish to be killed. Tordon 101 is such a chemical. Read label carefully to determine soil activity.

Folar absorbed herbicide will work its way down to the roots no matter how deep they may grow.

Rexter
05-22-2008, 08:42 AM
If you can get your hands on some vintage Vietnam era agent orange - that will kill it. It will kill anything!! There were still bare spots in the Nam 10 years later where this stuff was sprayed.

Rexter
05-22-2008, 08:49 AM
Seriously, follow this link. It is the best info to date on the subject.

http://www.clemson.edu/extfor/publications/ec656/

Not an easy task.

Any groundhogs in that kudzu need eradicating?

OL' Square Britches
05-22-2008, 09:05 AM
Kudzu can take over where ever it is, which makes me wonder about another issue-is Kudzu good or bad for fish. Why doesn't someone try to plant Kudzu in some of these lakes that they can't get grass to grow in? Like Lake Allatoona, i guess it would get out of hand like Hydrilla does sometimes on guntersville then they have to spray it-which i think hurts the fish-never know though-Kudzu could be a good thing in this situation, just a thought.:huh:

redlevel
05-22-2008, 09:10 AM
Vernon's advice is good, especially the part about retreating for several years. If your kudzu patch is astride a landline, you need to get the other landowner involved in the control efforts, else you will be fighting a losing battle. It would almost be worthwhile to pay for the chemical for him/her to help control the patch.

As a point of information, Garlon 4 is the same chemical as Remedy. There is also now a generic product available called Clear Pasture that is the same. The generic is somewhat cheaper than the other products. The chemical ingredient is triclopyr (61.6%) in all these products. As Mr. Vernon said, don't use diesel fuel or crop oil because it will burn the foilage before it has the chance to absorb the chemical and translocate it to the root system. I do add some surfactant, though, because it makes the spray stick better and helps make it rain-fast. I use about a pint of surfactant to about 50 gallons of mix.

The Remedy label says, "For management of kudzu, apply Remedy at 1 quart per acre. Repeat application may be necessary to achieve desired level of control."

That would be on a broadcast basis.

If there are no trees you want to save, a tank mix of Remedy plus Grazon P+D is effective. Grazon P+D is the same chemical as Tordon 101. The active ingredients are picloram (10.2%) and 2,4-D (39.6%). The picloram is soil active, and will kill some things you might not want to kill, and the 2,4-D has been known to drift and kill a cotton patch a mile away.

Here are a couple of websites every Georgia landowner should probably be familar with.

http://www.invasive.org/eastern/srs/

http://publications.iowa.gov/1745/1/pdfs/grassland2002/brushmanagement.pdf

flatfoot
05-22-2008, 09:13 AM
My brother had the same problem with kudzu in a 3 acre field. He used a chemical called Crossbow. The kudzu died within a couple of weeks, at least on the surface. We then bush-hogged, plowed & subsoiled to get up the roots. We had piles of them to burn. The next year, he started doing foodplots. He still has occasional sprouts but the kudzu is completely under control. There is still kudzu on the other side of the property line, we just spray as far as the sprayer can reach and keep any wandering vines bush-hogged. If you ever gain any ground on it, don't let up, that stuff can recover in a blink of an eye.

Trizey
05-22-2008, 09:39 AM
The City of Chattanooga uses goats to control Kudzu going up the ridgecut.

Wild Turkey
05-22-2008, 09:48 AM
roundup and diesel works but aint really legal.
The diesel weakens it so the roundup can work better.
itll take 2 or more shots.

Substitute diesel for water in your sprayer.

Never done it myself because it isnt legal.

fishbum2000
05-22-2008, 09:58 AM
what ever herbacide you decide to use, instead of mixing it with diesil fuel mix it with dish detergent. this will help the herbacide stick to the leaves better and promotes soaking of the chemicals into the plant. good luck this is a hard plant to kill.you got to stay on it and you can get it manageable in a few years

dixie
05-22-2008, 10:14 AM
a mixture of diesel and creosote works REAL well to kill it

gadeerwoman
05-22-2008, 11:01 AM
dish washing liquid will work to a certain extent as a surfactant but crop oil works better as it does not foam nearly as much nor does it wash off. And it's inexpensive. Tractor Supply has a good one called Surf. Garlon will definitely do the job. If it's an old patch, several applications to get total kill may be needed. Kudzu roots go deep. Grazing cattle or goats on it continuously will also work.

60Grit
05-22-2008, 11:08 PM
I eliminated a Kudzu patch on my place that had been established more than 50 years.

I purchased a 5 gallon back pack sprayer (Solo brand). I used Garlon 4 herbicide for the first treatment, following label instructions. Mixed dye in the solution so as to assure full and complete coverage.

One year later the patch was dead except for an occasional green spot which was recovering. Applied a second treatment with Roundup. Two or three years later I discovered a half dozen single sprouts which were subsequently treated with Roundup.

My house now sits in the middle of this patch. I have shrubs, flowers, and trees, and zero kudzu.

If you use a Restricted Use Herbicide you must have an applicators license to purchase and to apply. You can go by your County Extension Office where they will allow you to watch a video and thus qualify for the license. They will issue you the license. This is the procedure in my County.

Do not mix diesel fuel with your herbicide. It will burn the foliage and will interfere with the folar uptake of the leaves.

Do not use a soil active herbicide (absorbed by roots) if you have trees in the area which you do not wish to be killed. Tordon 101 is such a chemical. Read label carefully to determine soil activity.

Folar absorbed herbicide will work its way down to the roots no matter how deep they may grow.

Thanks Mr. Vernon. that is the best advice yet.

Woodscrew
05-28-2008, 11:25 AM
I have heard that if it is grazed to the point of not allowing enough growth to get sufficient sunlight it will die within a couple of years.

I think the person who told me that used goats as the grazers.

Yeah there isn't anything a goat likes better than some Kudzu and they will get rid of it if you leave them on it.

Metro Head Hunter
05-29-2008, 08:35 AM
I don't know if you want to remove it to be able to plant a food plot or not, but if you are then leave it alone. You've already got one of the best plots you could grow. I 've got a couple of acres of kudzu on my hunting property in different locations and all I do is manage it. First go in and bush hog it down and back to the wood line after hunting season or before mid summer. By doing this you'll cut out any brush under it so it doesn't have anything to climb on.This will allow it two grow with new growth and be about knee high so you can see out in it. When bow and the first of gun season gets here you've got the best food plot you could amagine.Then after the first frost normally around the first of november go in and bushog and turn under and plant some winter wheat to finish out the rest of the season. It needs no water and no fertilizer to grow, it's a maintainence free food plot. I'll tell you a secret if you start watching that patch around the end of july and all the way to bow season you'll see more deer than you can amagine and you'll know what bucks are on your property or in the surrounding area because they'll be in there every evening eating away.

crackerdave
05-29-2008, 10:01 AM
Kudzu is good.My wife makes some dee-lishus jelly out of the blossom clusters.