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Randy
10-08-2008, 11:27 AM
I have batted around getting in to this sport for a while. As best I can tell one rod will not work for every situation so...

Let's assume I fish for bass mostly on the river. What rod/ reel type and weight should I begin with?

I know I will eventually need one for inshore and a light weight one for rivers for panfish/trout later but I need to start with what I do the most.

So what say you?

Maybe you could add what I need for the others as well?

Bitteroot
10-08-2008, 11:38 AM
I would start with a 5 or 6 weight rod in the 9 foot range. I have landed 6 plus pund bass with that and buddys that have caught bigger. One of my fishing buds just got back from Canada and landed many 10 lbs plus fish on the same set up.

A good reel with an exposed rim drag and quality line, probably a weight forward since you will be tossing larger flies and bugs for bass. If it was exclusively a BASS rod, I would opt for a 8 weight, but the 5 or 6 will give yo plenty of muscle with enough finesse to take to bigger trout water, such as the hooch or hiwassee in our area. Price is a factor for me, so I really like the TFO (Temple Fork Outfitters) series rods and the Okuma reels. Both give great proformance, without breaking my wallet. I have some nicer rods, but don't use them as much as I do the TFO's. Also they have a great $25 repair/replacement warranty. Doesn't matter if a fish breaks it, or your wife over your head. Bass Pro carries these as well as the Fly Box in Marietta. If you want more info, feel free to shoot me a PM with contact info, and we'll talk more about it. There are many prices and types out there, so go to a good shop and cast many before making up you mind.

Paymaster
10-08-2008, 11:41 AM
Randy:

I have several rods due to just what you mentioned. The situation and environment you fish will determine the equipment. I use a 6/7 weight 8'6" rod for rivers like the Hooch near Atlanta. I have a 3 weight 7'I use in smaller steams. You will need fly line that is compatible with your rod weight. There are larger rods for saltwater but I have yet to try Salt water fly fishing. You would do well to hook up with a friend tha fly fishes for advice and instruction. You will learn much quicker. Also the 6/7 weight rod works well on lakes and ponds but so would 4/5 weight. I am sure others will jump in here with there take on advice, I hope.

Paymaster
10-08-2008, 11:43 AM
I would start with a 5 or 6 weight rod in the 9 foot range. I have landed 6 plus pund bass with that and buddys that have caught bigger. One of my fishing buds just got back from Canada and landed many 10 lbs plus fish on the same set up.

A good reel with an exposed rim drag and quality line, probably a weight forward since you will be tossing larger flies and bugs for bass. If it was exclusively a BASS rod, I would opt for a 8 weight, but the 5 or 6 will give yo plenty of muscle with enough finesse to take to bigger trout water, such as the hooch or hiwassee in our area. Price is a factor for me, so I really like the TFO (Temple Fork Outfitters) series rods and the Okuma reels. Both give great proformance, without breaking my wallet. I have some nicer rods, but don't use them as much as I do the TFO's. Also they have a great $25 repair/replacement warranty. Doesn't matter if a fish breaks it, or your wife over your head. Bass Pro carries these as well as the Fly Box in Marietta. If you want more info, feel free to shoot me a PM with contact info, and we'll talk more about it. There are many prices and types out there, so go to a good shop and cast many before making up you mind.

Good Stuff!!!!!

anglerEd
10-08-2008, 12:37 PM
Randy, I would say go with a 5 weight. There certianly is a good arguement for going with a 6 weight, because you will be throwing somewhat heavier buggers and streamers for bass. 7 would be unneccessary and heavy. I still say go with a 5 for starters. You can always get more rods, and a 5 is extremely versatile for starters. Lighter and less laborsome too. Definitely a 9 footer and I would want a Fast action. You might struggle a little less with a slower Med to Med Fast action. That will open up your loop and hopefully leave you tying fiewer wind knots. Get a good quality rod ($100- $200)and buy Premium Line($60+). Paymasters TFO recomendation is a good buy for the money. I don't have one, but I have checked them out. Good Buy. IMO, there is little need to put much money in the reel unless you just want something fancy. With the kind of fishing we are talking about, the reel is little more than line storage, and expensive drag systems are rarely of any value. Bass, be it shoaly or otherwise, arent particularly big sprinters. You can get all the drag control you need from the palm of your hand. If we were striper, drum, or bone fishing, we wold be having a different conversation. Line---Heed some other advice here for bass fishing. Most of my fly fishing is for trout. For that, a "weight forward" line. This is certianly what you want for any top water flies. For stripping buggers and streamers, you might want an extra rig or spool for a fast sink tip line.

Remember, I still want a kayak trip. I have plenty of fly gear for both of us. Lets get together and I will give you a crash course on the water. We will rig up floating lines , sink tips, and we will see what we can hook up with. Leave the conventional rods at home for a change. I have a whitewater kayak around now. I have been down to the omugy a few times with it. Got my first shoaley!

Paymaster
10-08-2008, 12:40 PM
Hey Randy, learn to cast on the ground before you tackle fly fishin from a Yak. Hate to see you dunk yer self learn'n. :bounce:

Randy
10-08-2008, 12:56 PM
I can stand and cast from a yak, no problem.

Paymaster
10-08-2008, 12:58 PM
I can stand and cast from a yak, no problem.

Not me,I can't cross a stream without dunk'n.:rofl:

SheldonMOAC
10-08-2008, 01:06 PM
Randy - such a tough questions but welcome to another world of fun. I have several fly rods in collections. In the GA area I use 5,6 and 7 weight rods. I like to throw very small flys in the 19-22 size range.

I would start out with a 6 or 7 weight rods. You can use it for bass, bluegill, trout. I also recommend the getting the best fly line you can afford.

I have several rods - so if you want to try any of them out before purchasing let me know.

I will even share some secret flys with you.

Bitteroot
10-08-2008, 02:25 PM
I can stand and cast from a yak, no problem.

:offtopic:What type of craft are you using? I have considered the sit on tops for the Hiwassee, but am unsure of the stability!

ucfsae81
10-08-2008, 02:46 PM
unlike regular fishing one rod will not do plan on dropping thousands of dollars into the sport, picture golf mixed in with fishing its very frustrating, but once you have the mechanics down and start tying your own flys its a blast.

i just started this year and the one thing i would say is sacrifice the money and get a good setup i currently use a sage fli rod an reel package that i got for $200

since you want to do inshore and fresh i would go with an 8wt, you can always loosen the drag and it will workin multiple places. a 6wt will work but using it in saltwater will be tough and you will have some tired fish on your hands.

but the biggest thing is to start off with quality stuff like someone said earlier tfo rods are great and you can get them for around $100 and a reel for another $100 then your line depending on what type floating or sinking and thats another $50 to $100 plus you have to add backing to that and all the fly's in the world. so for a decent setup plan on around $300 to $400 if buying at a store

Randy
10-08-2008, 02:54 PM
:offtopic:What type of craft are you using? I have considered the sit on tops for the Hiwassee, but am unsure of the stability!
I have three different ones I can stand in. But the most stable one on the market is our Prowler Big Game. You can stand and fish from it all day.

http://www.oceankayak.com/kayaks/angler_editions/prowler_big_game.html

Hogtown
10-09-2008, 01:56 PM
The rod I use most is my 5wt, followed by a 6 wt; however, you indicated that we are to assume you fished fished mostly for bass on the river so I would say go with a 6 or 7 wt.

hevishot
10-09-2008, 02:01 PM
since you like to shoal bass fish like I do, 6 wt would be the only choice for me....5 wt will work but the way a 6wt loads out of a yak with the ability to throw larger stuff...6 wt all the way...imo.

allenww
10-11-2008, 06:22 PM
You have gotten some excellent advice, but if your budget is tight don't fret.

I have flyfished for 50 years with a Pfleuger medalist reel on a fiberglass rod. I have fun every time I go, and can count the ones I have lost due to equipment on one hand.

Buy the best you can afford. If that is a Granger and a Medalist, don't hesitate to go for it.

wa

codep
10-11-2008, 09:08 PM
All the info everyone has posted is top notch, I use to guide in Montana and South dakota and have caught fish with very expensive rods and reel combo's and very cheap outfits, rember the fish does not care what your outfit cost they just want the presentation to be perfect. Good luck and keep your line wet!

Newman
10-12-2008, 12:07 AM
I'm with everyone else on the 5 wt. rod. I too have a Sage FLi and it works great (I love my Sage's). If you are serious about getting into the sport (which is a blast by the way), I would re-think getting a cheaper reel. Yes in most cases it does really just hold your line, but when you've got the fish of a lifetime on, and you lose it because you don't have enough drag- you'll kick yourself. I pair all my rods with a Ross reel. They are fairly pricey, but do come with a lifetime warranty, and are made in the USA.

croaker
10-12-2008, 12:31 AM
I have batted around getting in to this sport for a while. As best I can tell one rod will not work for every situation so...

Let's assume I fish for bass mostly on the river. What rod/ reel type and weight should I begin with?


So what say you?



Randy, a 6wt rod and reel will do fer most river bassin'.

thegaduck
10-13-2008, 06:56 PM
Check the discout section in the back. I got a Sage Launch, 5 wt., 9' for $100. They had several other makes for $50-$75. Starting out I would try some of these models. Fly fishing is like any thing else, you can spend as much or as little as you like. The fish on the Bighorn last week seemed to like my $100 bargain basement rod.

Newman
10-13-2008, 08:09 PM
I hope I'm not ruining anyone else's secret :huh:, but I have bought my last two outfits from these guys and they are great. It's a fly shop in Asheville, NC called Hunter Banks (do a google search- they're on the web), and they often have good rods and reels on sale. Right now they have numerous rods for sale at 20% and up off. I think they only charged me about $5 shipping and no sales tax on out of state purchases. I like to cast rods before I buy them, but if you can try one out at a show- and then these guys put them on sale- great.

Lester7009
02-26-2009, 03:31 PM
I would go with 5 Wt 8' 6" for streams . If you fish lakes this will still work. As mentioned Buy the Best one time and enjoy and save money down the road buying more rods because you are looking for something a little better. A premium rod is lighter, more sensitiveand can cast all day long. Just my thought

cardfan
03-08-2009, 06:43 AM
i've been into fly fishing for around 2 years...love it! I kept an eye out here (pre fly forum)...also georgiariverfishing.com...and craigslist....

You'll find alot of people who bought high end set ups and decided fly fishing is not for them...discount shopping at it's best...

speechless33759
03-09-2009, 10:33 PM
Order of importance
Rod > Line > Reel

For a beginner TFO Professional Series 9ft 5 wt overlined with a 6wt weight forward floating Scientific Anglers Trout Mastery Line on any reel. This is a good all around setup until you start buying more setups. TFO makes great rods, but I think are underrated in terms of line weight.