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big john h
08-14-2006, 08:57 PM
I threw a crawfish/minnow trap off the end of dock in approximately 5 to 6 feet of water. Baited with canned cat food. Came back 48 hours later and there was a dead 4- copperhead in it. Must have smelled the bait, swam down, gotten stuck in the trap and drowned. I've seen them around water before but never knew they went 5-6 feet underwater to hunt. Smelled like pinkiepinkiepinkiepinkie!

ramsey
08-14-2006, 09:41 PM
good ridance :cheers:

7Mag Hunter
08-15-2006, 07:49 AM
I have seen them around ponds while fishing, and even
in the water...
Found dead one by our mailbox last week...Think I might
have got him with the weedeater when I cleaned the
ditch culvert pipe last week...Did not look like he was hit
by a car...Had Lab bit by something 2 weeks ago...Nose
and lip swelled up on one side...Probably the snake, but
not much damage to my pup...Maybe a dry bite....

big john h
08-15-2006, 11:34 AM
I like the natural world in general and people say that snakes keep the rodents away BUT I'd rather see a mouse than a poisonous snake AND I have two small kids. I just never knew they could swim so deep.

Vernon Holt
08-15-2006, 01:41 PM
Not to be contrary, but have you ever heard of a highland moccasin?? Older people who lived closer to nature than do we today called the Copperhead a "Highland Moccasin".

I do not think it to be just coincidental that they called them thusly. My own experience has demonstratedThat they are not at home in bodies of water.

It would not be unusual for a Copperhead, or any snake for that matter, to cross a stream or even a lake in event he wanted to be on the other shore. Going under water for his feed would be some feat for him.

Copperheads normally feed on mice, voles, lizzards, frogs, and insects. All of these prey are plentiful on dry sites where the Copperhead is likely to be found.

I would suspect that your snake was the common Banded Water Snake. Their markings and their coloration are somewhat similar, yet there are some striking differences. The shape of the head is quite different with the Copperhead being a pit viper.

Just something to think about.

big john h
08-15-2006, 02:50 PM
It was a Copperhead. I've decapitated enough with a hoe (4 this summer alone) to be able to recognize them. They are pale brown and splotched with a thick arrow pointed head. The Banded is much smaller and much darker. Of course his decomposition could have changed the color! hmmm

The definition of moccasin = venomous semiaquatic snake of swamps in southern United States That alone should tell you they like the water but I've never heard of one going underwater to eat. Maybe you are right.

Vernon Holt
08-15-2006, 03:57 PM
"It was a Copperhead. I've decapitated enough with a hoe (4 this summer alone) to be able to recognize them. They are pale brown and splotched with a thick arrow pointed head. The Banded is much smaller and much darker.

The definition of moccasin = venomous semiaquatic snake of swamps in southern United States That alone should tell you they like the water but I've never heard of one going underwater to eat. Maybe you are right".

John: The Copperhead is not pale brown, but rather is copper colored and can be somewhat glossy.

The banded water snake adult is rather large at over four feet long. A Copperhead seldom exceeds 3 feet in length.

The Water Moccasin is truly an aquatic snake, seldom seen very far from water. The Moccasin is separate and distinct from either the Copperhead or the Banded Water Snake. My earlier reference was to the "Highland Moccasin" which was a common name for Copperhead in some locales.

shaggybill
08-15-2006, 09:24 PM
Vernons right (as usual) on this one. While copperheads aren't averse to swimming across a creek or such, diving underwater for a food item would be incredibly out of character for one. Water snakes, on the other hand, are commonly seen underwater searching for prey.

Check out some comparison pictures of copperheads and water snakes. They can be diffucult to distinguish to the untrained eye, but if you examine them closely, you can tell pretty easily.

Also, a lot of snakes will display a triangular shaped head when in a defensive mode. Water snakes especially have very triangular heads when on the defense.

For instance, check out this photo of a copperbelly water snake from KY. It's not my picture, just to be clear.

http://www.biology.eku.edu/T&ESpecies/CopperbellyWaterSnake.jpg

Here's another water snake. I bet most people would identify this as a copperhead, but it's actually just a northern water snake.

http://www.rlephoto.com/herps/snake_N_water/4869_snake_ds_std.jpg

big john h
08-16-2006, 08:47 AM
You guys are probably right but the Copperhead is pale. It has brown and rust colored markings but the main skin is much paler then many people think.

shaggybill
08-16-2006, 06:20 PM
Yup, you're right. Southern Copperheads especially can be very pale, but the Northern subspecies, which is found in N. GA, can be pretty dark.

Here are a couple of pictures for comparison. This is a Southern Copperhead from south-east NC.
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-11/507948/03301443-nc4_large.jpg

This is a Northern Copperhead from east Kentucky.
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-11/507948/copper3.jpg

While pretty much all of the southern subspecies are very pale, in the northern subspecies, light colored snakes are not uncommon. Here is another northern copperhead from east KY, found 75 feet from the one above. Look how different the coloring is.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-11/507948/copper02.jpg

And here is a reddish-colored copperhead from Red River Gorge in KY, found a mile away from the two above.
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-11/507948/copper03.jpg

WTM45
08-16-2006, 06:57 PM
Nice pictures. All of the sudden, I can smell burning powder from a .410 shotshell! Must be my subliminal....

big john h
08-17-2006, 08:38 AM
that's weird how much they change. the ones down here in middle ga are very pale like that top one

abrannon
09-14-2006, 04:58 PM
I find Water Moccasins and varies water snakes and small turtles in my crawfish baskets. They go in to eat one of their natural prey (Crawfish), and can not get out.

It's bad when the snake is still alive. Especially if it is a Water Moccasin.

RatherBHuntin
09-15-2006, 08:54 PM
Notice the lighter colored "copper head" on all of the copperheads

elfiii
10-04-2006, 10:22 AM
Very interesting. I had no idea there was such a wide variety of coloration in the species.

little rascal
10-06-2006, 07:19 AM
......to distinguish between the harmless and the Venomous, it's all in the eyes. Venomous snakes have slits for pupil's (like cat eyes). Harmless snakes have rounded pupils like you and I. The red bellied water snake has been acused of being a Moccasin or Cottonmouth more than a few times, but check his eyes, if they are round pupils, go ahead and snatch him up and play with him a few minutes, then release him! Also look at a Viper in the water, they float(ride high) at rest. A common watersnake or non-viper will appear to be on the surface, but at rest the lower 2/3 rds of his body will sink. Saw a Venomous snake crossing a pond once and was shot at with a .22, he heard the bullet strike the bank opposite where the shot was fired, he coiled up on the surface facing the shore where the bullet made the noise and ready to strike. 5 people saw this, including myself!!!!!

little rascal
10-06-2006, 07:52 AM
.....the Eastern Coral snake may be the only Venomous snake in North America with rounded pupils. So don't confuse it with the other harmless snakes. If you are lucky enough to witness a Coral snake, just remember...............
If.."Red touches Yellow..can Kill a fellow."
.." Red touches Black...can't Kill Jack."

Pale Blue Dun
10-06-2006, 06:28 PM
.....the Eastern Coral snake may be the only Venomous snake in North America with rounded pupils. So don't confuse it with the other harmless snakes. If you are lucky enough to witness a Coral snake, just remember...............
If.."Red touches Yellow..can Kill a fellow."
.." Red touches Black...can't Kill Jack."

Dont care about the eyes...I see a snake, it dies.

Dan

Confederate_Jay
01-18-2007, 12:29 AM
A juvenile water moccasin very much resembles a copperhead also. The pattern is different,but the color si similar. Easiest way to identify a moccasin is the dark stripe than runs along each side of the head right through the area where the eye is.

Always heard that the Moccasin was the most aggressive snake but most I've encountered always tried to go the other way. I have read and been told that the copperhead is much more the aggressor. I do know that when stepped on , run over, or otherwise molested they will strike wildly and repeatedly.

Twenty five ought six
01-18-2007, 08:44 AM
When I fished the Altamaha regularly, I would run into water mocassins that were either aggressive or would not give way, like when you were trying to get up in a slough.

On a big mocassin, there is no mistaking the head, and esepecially when he opens his mouth. That white mouth against a dark background makes an excellent target.

CAMO84
01-18-2007, 09:05 AM
As far as the different colors this is also cause by the shedding process. Snakes skin will vary due to the age of their shedding from what I had seen in my past experiences. As far as the pupils you are correct the only problem I have always had is my vision isn't good enough to see from a far enough distance and they dont like you starring them in the eye up close they tend to bite.

THREEJAYS
01-18-2007, 01:53 PM
:hair: Ya'll trying to stop my wife from ever going back to the lake:hair:

Jasper
01-18-2007, 02:14 PM
Nice pictures. All of the sudden, I can smell burning powder from a .410 shotshell! Must be my subliminal....

:rofl:

Jasper
01-18-2007, 02:15 PM
[QUOTE=little rascal;881955 check his eyes, if they are round pupils, go ahead and snatch him up and play with him a few minutes, then release him! QUOTE]

:hair:

Good info here everyone!

THREEJAYS
01-18-2007, 02:19 PM
[QUOTE=little rascal;881955 check his eyes, if they are round pupils, go ahead and snatch him up and play with him a few minutes, then release him! QUOTE]

:hair:

Good info here everyone!

Yea like my wife is going to get that close, not a chance:rofl:

SuthernStix
01-18-2007, 04:06 PM
I been living around a lake for many years and I have seen many copperheads in the water and around the edges. They will dive under water, especially when they see you have a shotgun in hand. :shoot: A few didn't get away so quick. They don't have any problem diving under water. How far they can go I don't know. As far as they need to I would think.

tail_slider3d
01-18-2007, 08:13 PM
To me the water snake looks more like a cottonmouth. I know cottonmouths are stubby in comparison but when they are wet and swimming its hard to tell. BUT the 20 gauge doesnt have a problem in the decision. If its swimming or around the water its dead.

panman
02-10-2007, 09:05 PM
When i lived in Lake county FL.i killed many many copper heads and moccicens.Most of the time when fishing.The snakes get used to people fishing at sertian spots.youve seen it if you fish along side road ponds.The snakes wait for you to through a dead bait or sumtin,then they will slowly go and get it.When i went fishing i always carried a dubble barreled daranger loaded with rat shot,the one with the blue tip.The ones with the crimpted ends are a waist of time.Most of the time one shot did the trick,sometimes two.It still amazises me how fast that little shot in the casing kills them.With a good shot they,most of the time dont even move,it must be the shock.I used to keep the gun in my watch pocket sos i wouldnt have to move very much to get at it.Good way to get bit,washing your hands!!!.pan.[sorry for the long rant and spelling.]

Emmersom Biggens
03-17-2007, 03:58 PM
Most folks dont realize that young copperheads and cottonmouths have tails that look like they were dipped in chartreuse dye, this can make really young ones easy to identify.

Lostoutlaw
03-18-2007, 07:21 PM
:rofl: :rofl: He! He! he ain't gonna tell U. But he froze'em then did it!!!!!:rofl: :rofl: ::ke:

BUCK 87JT
03-28-2007, 01:18 PM
YEP I MADE THAT MISTAKE AND KILLED WATER SNAKE THINKING IT WAS A COPPER HEAD CAN NEVER BE TO CAREFUL

big john h
04-04-2007, 02:54 PM
that's how i felt. Even if it was a harmless snake my wife and kids would freak out

Dub
05-07-2007, 09:14 PM
Nice pictures. All of the sudden, I can smell burning powder from a .410 shotshell! Must be my subliminal....

Yup....sure are some well camoed devils. Not nearly enough bullets to make a difference.:shoot: :shoot: :shoot:

Rich Kaminski
12-22-2007, 04:17 PM
Young Cotton Mouths look a lot like Copperheads. If you don't take the time to study them, you can easily mistake one for the other.
The Cottom Mouth looks like it is floating on top of the water when it swims. Only the head of the copperhead is above the water when it is swimming.

dawg2
12-22-2007, 04:19 PM
That is right. Juveniles have canary yellow tips.

Ruger#3
12-23-2007, 12:45 PM
Back in eastern KY we used to sein for crawdads for bait in the small creeks. MY Grandpa and Dad would walk along the road or trail next to the creek with a mining light shined down for us to see what was in our sein. I was about 13 when my cousin and I lifted up the sein one night and there was a fat ole copperhead striking wildly at the net.

Yes it was a Copperhead, we slung that sein up out of that creek and it landed all tangled in the dirt road. My Grandpa killed the snake with a flat rock. We looked at it, including the fangs. I wasn't very eager to get back in that creek again ankle to knee deep water in the dark.

Hooked On Quack
12-23-2007, 12:55 PM
Moccasin and cottonmouth same thing?? I have seen a moccasin with a small bream in its mouth lying on a stump in a creek.

potsticker
12-24-2007, 11:38 AM
common water snake or brown banded version.

Rem270
12-24-2007, 02:39 PM
Copperheads don't dive, they do however swim on the surface when needed. What was in your trap was either a banded or brown water snake. All snakes have what's called cryptic coloration. Most non-venomous snakes mimic more dangerous species to keep predators from bothering them. Unfortunately that doesn't work with hunters, you are just as content to shoot all snakes, especially if they look dangerous. Most narodians, water snakes, have similar coloration that mimics that of cotton mouths. The banding also resembles copper heads, but as already mentioned copper heads are much lighter in color. Oh, and only juvenile copper heads have yellow tails, juvenile cotton mouths are brownish in color with dark black bands like banded and brown water snakes but have a dark black tip instead of yellow. Once they grow to maturity, normally no longer than 4 foot, but with fat, stumpy bodies, they get very dark in color, almost solid black but with hints of their banding. As a college graduate of biology I try to lean on the side of conservation. I can understand someone disposing of one around the house where their are small children and pets. Out in the wild however, we should let them be. They are here for a reason.

Woodsman69
12-25-2007, 09:02 PM
They are here for a reason.

Yes, target practice!

patchestc
12-26-2007, 02:41 PM
last time i went fishing in the altamaha, a big fat snake swam up to my boat. after i introduced myself properly, i smacked him across
the face with my fishing rod. he took the hint and went away.
i try not to kill 'em if i can help it.

potsticker
12-28-2007, 10:54 AM
Good job patch, once you get his attention hes likely to make himself scarce. Ive handled all species of north american snakes, i feel comfy if i have the upper hand, if i dont i feel all warm and squishy.
I had an incident with a particularly nasty cottonmouth on a lake called lake iamonia, just across the Ga., Fla. line. I was in my bass boat the water had risen and we were able to fish the cypress swamps. I was sitting up front with running the trolling motor, my cousin in the back. A loud thump in the boat followed immidiately by a loud splash. I looked around to see my cousin floating in the water. I rushed over to the back to help when i noticed a large cottonmouth, lying in the floor of the boat, he had that white mouth open and it was swaying like a cobra. I just grabbed the net and scooped him up and tossed everything overboard. After retrieveing my cousin, i got to the net and it was empty. The snake had bailed out of the tree limbs hit my cousin on the back and had fallen in the boat, he said the snake can have the boat, he was so scared he could have just walked back.

Rem270
12-29-2007, 10:12 AM
Good job patch, once you get his attention hes likely to make himself scarce. Ive handled all species of north american snakes, i feel comfy if i have the upper hand, if i dont i feel all warm and squishy.
I had an incident with a particularly nasty cottonmouth on a lake called lake iamonia, just across the Ga., Fla. line. I was in my bass boat the water had risen and we were able to fish the cypress swamps. I was sitting up front with running the trolling motor, my cousin in the back. A loud thump in the boat followed immidiately by a loud splash. I looked around to see my cousin floating in the water. I rushed over to the back to help when i noticed a large cottonmouth, lying in the floor of the boat, he had that white mouth open and it was swaying like a cobra. I just grabbed the net and scooped him up and tossed everything overboard. After retrieveing my cousin, i got to the net and it was empty. The snake had bailed out of the tree limbs hit my cousin on the back and had fallen in the boat, he said the snake can have the boat, he was so scared he could have just walked back.


Great story, I'm literally laughing out loud. I'm sure it wasn't funny at the time for your cousin but it's pretty funny now!! :rofl::rofl::rofl: I know what you mean about having the upper hand. If you see them first and keep clear it ain't a big deal, but if you get surprised by them it ain't too fun!!:hair::hair:

bowbuck
12-29-2007, 10:04 PM
I know two good ole boys from college, who were fishing down in Ware county and a cottonmouth fell into the jonboat they were in. They had apparently had one too many and the guy in the back pulled out a .45 and emptied it into the snake and the bottom of the boat. It was an ancient wooden boat his grandpa had on the pond and it sank like the Titanic. They had to swim to shore and lost all their tackle. To hear them tell it is absolutely hilarious. Glad I live and fish in North Georgia.

GA DAWG
01-01-2008, 08:37 PM
Lots of people have no clue as to what kind of snakes they see or kill. I hear of bunches of cottonmouths killed up here in north ga every year. We all know they aint none up here. Hear all these people killing copperheads while fishing lol... What they are killing is just a water snake... Not saying this one was but thats what most are.

GA DAWG
01-12-2008, 01:45 PM
Who says we "all know there aren't any up here"?
I have a place in southwest Atlanta, where in the springtime, I will bet you $1000 that you will not walk 200 yards through it in a pair of shorts and tennis shoes without getting hit by a cottonmouth.
I know, I know, that old saw about "they dont come above the fall line". The guys who think that have been reading too many textbooks....the cottonmouths don't read those books.
Thank you.
Douglas I'd have to come see them. I dont believe what I dont see and I've never saw one in north ga. WATER SNAKES YES, COTTONMOUTHS NOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

potsticker
01-15-2008, 08:42 AM
Well we all use to think cottonmouths lived below the fall line. A line roughly from savannah to south of macon to below west point lake. Most still believe in that as i havent seen one in lake west point but harding, a few miles south is full of them. We may want to change our thinking with armidillios seen as far as gainesville. Gators(large one) abouve 285 in the hooch. Remember we use to catch 10lb trout in lanier.

dog1
01-15-2008, 09:40 AM
I live in Wilcox County and have always hunted, deer, hogs, squirrels, up and down the Ocmulgee river. We have a good variety of snakes around here. Diamond Backs, timber ratlers, cotton mouths, and the copper heads. I've never seen a coral snake but they say they are here. On the river, the most common to see is the common water snake and occasional cotton mouth. On dry land in swamps I hunt it's common to see copperheads. I had one bite an old dog of mine on the nose (beagle) a few years ago and her head really welled up. I found her in my shop later and didn't think she would make it thru the nite, but by 10 p.m. she was at the door scratching to get in. My young beagle had the snake cornered next to my porch when I drove up and I killed it, that's how I knew what bit the old dog.

I've got an old military buddy that lives just a few miles out of Athens, Ga. He has been coming down here to hog hunt with me for several years, normally comes down in January or Feb. Even when it's could, first thing he wants to know before driving down is, how many snakes I've seen. I try to tell him to just act like they are furniture and walk around them, needless to say, he dosen't buy that attitude.

I've killed two diamond backs in my yard, one was 71 inches, and the other was 65 inches, they were dispatched immediately.

I've walked within inches of the copperheads (before I saw them) and they have never seemed aggresive to me, however, I don't mess with them.

dog1

GAnaturalist
01-16-2008, 04:16 AM
In general copperheads and other pit vipers rarely dive. 3/4ths of their body will float on the top of the water. The only time the would dive is to get a fish in shallow water, and that is usually just water moccasins. I know because I have been a venomous snake handler for 20 years, worked as a DNR ranger for 5 years, and specialized in doing venomous snake programs all over the state.

Georgia's non venomous water snakes will swim with only thier head portion sticking up out of the water, and will dive to great depts and hold their breath for over 10 minutes. Generally that is how you tell the difference at a glance (when they are in the water) between venomous and non-venomuos. The cat eyed/slanted pupil method does not always work. A venomous snakes pupils will dialate out to round pupils when the light is low. Trust me.

-Timber ratter below, named "Bitey"

-Copperhead bite, Charlotte Medical Center.

GAnaturalist
01-16-2008, 04:22 AM
Oh, never seen Agkistrodon piscivorous conanti in North Georgia either, never, and never will except for in my enclosers.

potsticker
01-16-2008, 08:31 AM
Im your huckleberry. I once thought id never see a armidillo north of perry but you see em run over on the roads as far as gainesville. While im not a gore guy, i think we are in a warming trend and animals will follow, alligators in the hooch. Reason for all the panther sightings in ga.

KILLDUX
01-16-2008, 11:58 AM
What is the farthest north someone has seen a gator. I used to live in Statesboro and saw them a lot on the Ogeechee. Now I am in Perry and have not seen one yet on the Ocmulgee, but I am told that they are there. I have seen them at Houston Lake Country Club.

potsticker
01-16-2008, 12:19 PM
Chattahoochee river last summer above I-285 a goodun. the snake thing still is a farce because copperheads will swim but not below the water. The only real swimmer below the water is a banded water snake, can and does feed under water. Queen snakes can do the same and may look like a cottonmouth. Ive caught small bream that upon netting had a watersnake trying to eat it. Ive seen on golf courses, after a hard rain, seen kingsnakes trying to kill and eat copperheads. I think and stand by the thought that the deep diving snakes were water snakes and would love the opportunity to have said snake bite me!

GA DAWG
01-16-2008, 01:44 PM
Their was a gator in dawson county on dawson forest last year. It was in a box but thats pretty far north lol !!!!!!

MustangMAtt30
01-16-2008, 01:54 PM
In general copperheads and other pit vipers rarely dive. 3/4ths of their body will float on the top of the water. The only time the would dive is to get a fish in shallow water, and that is usually just water moccasins. I know because I have been a venomous snake handler for 20 years, worked as a DNR ranger for 5 years, and specialized in doing venomous snake programs all over the state.

Georgia's non venomous water snakes will swim with only thier head portion sticking up out of the water, and will dive to great depts and hold their breath for over 10 minutes. Generally that is how you tell the difference at a glance (when they are in the water) between venomous and non-venomuos. The cat eyed/slanted pupil method does not always work. A venomous snakes pupils will dialate out to round pupils when the light is low. Trust me.

-Timber ratter below, named "Bitey"

-Copperhead bite, Charlotte Medical Center.

Is that you in the hospital? If so what was it like to get bit by a snake? Painful? Scary?

GAnaturalist
01-16-2008, 04:22 PM
It smart a little.

Just kidding, it still hurts sometimes 20 years later, It is hard to bend my finger, and it gets worse in cold weather. It felt like a lighter under my finger, a constant intense burn. No upset stomach, or passing out, just burning. They gave me morphine 6 hours after, and I woke up in the ICU because they could not give me antivenom since they thought I could be alergic to horses. Back then most antivenom was made from horse serum. Now they use CroFab. long story. The picture was taken on the 5th day in the hospitol, so I looked much better, but under the bandages all my skin was gone except for some remaining under the finger. They were going to amputate, but I started showing signs of good healing.

Anyway, copperheads and water moccasins have hemotoxic venom, it destroys skin and muscle tissue, and is very painfull. Some rattlesnakes and all coral snakes have neurotoxic venom, which attacks the central nervous system, and has been know to be less painfull, but totally lethal. Sometimes there is less damage to the skin, uncontrolable muscle spasms, that eventually effects other important muscles that you don't want to sieze up like your lungs and heart.

so.... yea it hurt. It is uncomfortable to type this, physically.

Son
01-16-2008, 05:35 PM
Believe me, I've seen copperheads on the bottom of the Flint River, and in some swift water.
Was bit in Chickasawhatchee Creek on the middle joint of the first finger. One fang got into the skin. It stung like a bee and turned black in a day. Took almost a year for the discolored nail to grow out. Joint still gets stiff at times.

bowanna
05-26-2008, 01:33 AM
With the exception of coral snakes, another way to distinguish poisonous snakes is they have a single row of scales below the anal slit.
Non poisonous have a double row.This works for young and old.

Scouter
05-26-2008, 09:51 PM
Maybe it is me. Reading thru it all and looking at the pictures, noticed one more difference between the water snake and the copperhead. The copperhead has an hour glass on its skin. The middle of the hour glass is on the backbone while the wider portion is on the side of the copperhead. The water snake has the large portion of the hour glass on its backbone and the narrow piece on its side, opposite the copperhead.
In a panic mode, not sure I would think to look for the difference. Same principle with the eyes.

lkn4deer
05-26-2008, 11:20 PM
I was fishing for crappie when I was in highschool,and we were catching plenty. The turtles started eating the crappie which were on a stringer,so we put the crappie in a five gallon bucket we were using for the minnows.I was fishing in the bucket for another minnow,looked down into the bucket and saw a watermoccasin with a crappie half way down his throat.I jumped back and he did too,right back into the pond.

91silvers
05-29-2008, 03:04 PM
I dont know what yall consider North Ga., but I can promise you that my brother and I killed a water moccasin in henry county back in the mid 70's. We had to fight him for the rights to our favorite creek. It was very aggressive, it floated on top of the water,its mouth was white as cotton and had fangs.
To be honest, my brother did the fighting, I gave him instruction from up on the bank. WAAY UP!:hair:

AnesMerc
05-31-2008, 06:49 PM
.....the Eastern Coral snake may be the only Venomous snake in North America with rounded pupils. So don't confuse it with the other harmless snakes. If you are lucky enough to witness a Coral snake, just remember...............
If.."Red touches Yellow..can Kill a fellow."
.." Red touches Black...can't Kill Jack."
Or "Red on black a friend of Jack"

"Red on Yellow kill a fellow"

AnesMerc
05-31-2008, 06:51 PM
With the exception of coral snakes, another way to distinguish poisonous snakes is they have a single row of scales below the anal slit.
Non poisonous have a double row.This works for young and old.

I am pretty sure you have to pick it up to check for that. I think I'll pass on that form of testing.

Burl E.
06-03-2008, 02:59 AM
I threw a crawfish/minnow trap off the end of dock in approximately 5 to 6 feet of water. Baited with canned cat food. Came back 48 hours later and there was a dead 4- copperhead in it. Must have smelled the bait, swam down, gotten stuck in the trap and drowned. I've seen them around water before but never knew they went 5-6 feet underwater to hunt. Smelled like pinkiepinkiepinkiepinkie!

I have seen this thread before and had the same thing happen to me Saturday.

A Buddy and I have been Gold Dredging on the Etowah. I have a couple of crawfish / minnow traps. I thought it would be a good time to toss them out.

I baited mine with some freezer burnt fish. When I lifted one trap out of the water, inside was a dead snake. It was only about 18"-20". I didn't look at it too long at it because it smelled like a pinkiepinkiepinkiepinkie! :eek:

coldwatter
06-17-2008, 01:48 PM
Check out the cooling ponds at the old Riverwood mill in Macon full of large gators

fishndinty
07-11-2008, 02:28 AM
GA DAWG,
I live in Rome and have seen water moccasins in several bodies of water up here in NW Georgia the 3 rivers has em, Paris Lake on the Georgia Highlands Campus, also the Rocky Mountain PFA....Cottonmouths live all the way up into the northern half of Illinois, for pete's sake!! I had one strike the bottom of my flip-flop sandal when I was bass fishing from shore up there once.....not fun times as I almost lost my bowels.
-Dinty
P.S. I grew up fishing in FL so my dad made sure I could tell water snakes apart. These were cottonmouths. Especially the one that struck my sandal then hissed at me like he was tough. I beat his sorry butt to death with a 6' spinnerbait rod. Rod was never the same either.