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  #26  
Old 07-12-2005, 06:38 PM
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I've told my son that even though all snakes aren't poisonous, he'd best stay away from all of them.
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Old 07-12-2005, 06:51 PM
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check this out: "[quote]The Rattlesnakes are readily told at once by the rattle.

But the Moccasins are not so easy. There are two kinds ; the Water Moccasin, or Cotton-mouth, found in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, --Alabama, and Louisiana, and the Copperhead, which is the Highland, or Northern Moccasin or Pilot Snake, found from Massachusetts to Florida and west to Illinois and Texas.
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  #28  
Old 07-12-2005, 11:00 PM
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Where was that quoted from?
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  #29  
Old 07-31-2005, 01:08 PM
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The pilot snake got its name because many people once thought that this snake guided timber rattlers and copperheads to safety when being pursued by people, predators, etc. The reason they thought this was because pilot snakes (which are black rat snakes - elaphe guttata guttata) often den up with copperheads and rattlesnakes during the winter, and can often be found in the same vincinity of these two snakes.

I was over by a hunt club between Waverly Hall and Talbottom on 208 a few weeks ago and found this juvenile timber rattler crossing the dirt road that runs through the club.



Met a super nice guy who managed the club and it surprised me when he allowed me let it go without him wanting to kill it first.

Live and let live. (unless you're actually hunting the animal )
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  #30  
Old 07-31-2005, 01:34 PM
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Default Pilot Snake

Shaggybill: Nice story, but you would have a hard time convincing my Father that a Pilot snake was a black snake. He would steadfastly contend that a Black Snake was none other than a Black Snake. He would further contend, as JimT2 did, that a Pilot Snake was none other than a common Copperhead.

I rather agree with my Father, as I almost always did.

Vernon
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  #31  
Old 07-31-2005, 03:58 PM
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My daddy was right on the pilot snake/copperhead too Mr. Vernon.
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  #32  
Old 07-31-2005, 04:43 PM
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I first asked ya'll about it because of hearing my Grandpa talk about them. He'd laugh at anyone saying it's a black snake. I'm sure big or darker colored copperheads are what he is referring to as a pilot. I've never actually seen one that he considered a pilot though. Anytime we killed a copperhead, he called it a copperhead, but would always want to see it to make sure it wasn't a pilot.
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  #33  
Old 07-31-2005, 07:34 PM
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Hi Vernon, I guess it just depends on what you grew up hearing, huh? I was talking to a friend of mine the other day and he said that his grandparents called common water snakes Water Moccasins, even though they knew these snakes were harmless.

Now if his grandparents would have come up to me and told me that there was a Water Moccasin out in the yard, I would have thought they meant a Cottonmouth, the other common name for the venomous Water Moccasin ( agkistrodon p. piscivorous).

Too many common names if you ask me...
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  #34  
Old 10-05-2005, 07:08 PM
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I thought the pilot snake was the one that flew airplanes.
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  #35  
Old 10-05-2005, 08:43 PM
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Default Thats what my Dad and Grad pa always said

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vernon Holt
In my South, the Pilot has always been a Copperhead. Have also heard the Copperhead referred to a "Highland Moccasin".

You can see in this the problem with common names. If you see some critter which is unknown to you, just name it yourself. The alternative is to learn the accepted name for the birds and bees. Better still, learn the Scientific Names.

Vernon

agree with you
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  #36  
Old 09-01-2017, 07:58 AM
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Default Growing up in SC Pilot snake is same as Copperhead

I always have heard that the Pilot Snake and the Copperhead are indeed the same snake, even verified that through an Encyclopedia.
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  #37  
Old 09-01-2017, 11:24 PM
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One only has to google "pilot snake" to see that depending on the location, some call it a black snake and others a Copperhead.

Lots of folklore on the Pilot Snake.

I grew up hearing the term "Highland Moccasin" for a Copperhead in South Georgia. We also called Crappie speckled perch or specks and bass were called trout.

I've also heard skunks called polecats. Then there was a big woodpecker we called Lord Gods. Flicker woodpeckers were "yeller hammers."
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  #38  
Old 09-01-2017, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deersled View Post
I always thought it was a rat snake also. Ratsnakes appearance change as they age. A young one could "maybe" be confused with a copperhead. An immature (1-3 ft) ratsnake looks alot different than a mature (5-7ft) one. But they are very, very beneficial. Just leave them rat eating machines alone.
"Black Ratsnakes are often confused with Northern Black Racers (Coluber c. constrictor), Black Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis g. nigra), Cornsnakes (Elaphe g. guttata), Eastern Milksnakes (Lampropeltis t. triangulum), and sometimes Northern Copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen)."

The juveniles do look way different than the adults;

http://www.marshall.edu/herp/snakes/black_ratsnake.htm

Apparently, Copperheads in parts of the mountains are gray. Maybe the gray ones are called Pilots. That wouldn't explain the OP's grandparents wanting to see the head to make sure. His grandparents distinguished color and head shininess to differentiate.
I think even the gray ones have "copper" heads.

Last edited by Artfuldodger; 09-01-2017 at 11:56 PM.
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  #39  
Old 09-02-2017, 09:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vernon Holt View Post
In my South, the Pilot has always been a Copperhead. Have also heard the Copperhead referred to a "Highland Moccasin".

You can see in this the problem with common names. If you see some critter which is unknown to you, just name it yourself. The alternative is to learn the accepted name for the birds and bees. Better still, learn the Scientific Names.

Vernon
The same here, Mr. Vernon. Around home nobody called em a copperhead either. It was always a highland moccasin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artfuldodger View Post
One only has to google "pilot snake" to see that depending on the location, some call it a black snake and others a Copperhead.

Lots of folklore on the Pilot Snake.

I grew up hearing the term "Highland Moccasin" for a Copperhead in South Georgia. We also called Crappie speckled perch or specks and bass were called trout.

I've also heard skunks called polecats. Then there was a big woodpecker we called Lord Gods. Flicker woodpeckers were "yeller hammers."

Yea, speckled or white perch, and trout. Daddy said when he was little there were two kinds of those big woodpeckers. There was the "Lord God" woodpecker, and there was one that looked a lot like it called the wood hen. He said the Lord God woodpecker was a little bit bigger than the wood hen and had more white on its back. He also said there were a lot more wood hens than Lord Gods and they had different calls. He never heard the names Ivorybill and Pileated woodpeckers until I was a grown man and explained it to him.

He also said that they were both good to eat.
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  #40  
Old 09-02-2017, 09:31 AM
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I've never heard of a pilot snake.
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  #41  
Old 09-02-2017, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
The same here, Mr. Vernon. Around home nobody called em a copperhead either. It was always a highland moccasin.




Yea, speckled or white perch, and trout. Daddy said when he was little there were two kinds of those big woodpeckers. There was the "Lord God" woodpecker, and there was one that looked a lot like it called the wood hen. He said the Lord God woodpecker was a little bit bigger than the wood hen and had more white on its back. He also said there were a lot more wood hens than Lord Gods and they had different calls. He never heard the names Ivorybill and Pileated woodpeckers until I was a grown man and explained it to him.

He also said that they were both good to eat.
Well thats a first ... Eating woodpeckers. I guess when you get right down to it, its all just meat.
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  #42  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:21 AM
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The same here, Mr. Vernon. Around home nobody called em a copperhead either. It was always a highland moccasin.

Yea, speckled or white perch, and trout. Daddy said when he was little there were two kinds of those big woodpeckers. There was the "Lord God" woodpecker, and there was one that looked a lot like it called the wood hen. He said the Lord God woodpecker was a little bit bigger than the wood hen and had more white on its back. He also said there were a lot more wood hens than Lord Gods and they had different calls. He never heard the names Ivorybill and Pileated woodpeckers until I was a grown man and explained it to him.

He also said that they were both good to eat.
Dad used to say he saw a healthy Poor Joe in a dead live oak.
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  #43  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Artfuldodger View Post
Dad used to say he saw a healthy Poor Joe in a dead live oak.
Lot of Po Joe`s around here too.
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  #44  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by blood on the ground View Post
Well thats a first ... Eating woodpeckers. I guess when you get right down to it, its all just meat.
We ate lots of Yellow Hammer Woodpeckers. (Flickers)

It's amazing how one can go up a few counties, cross a state line, or up to the mountains and here different names for things.
For instance tomato gravy or hoe cake has different meanings. Oh and a Brush Axe. Some call it a brush axe and others call it a _______.
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  #45  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:28 AM
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Lot of Po Joe`s around here too.
What is a Po Joe bird?
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  #46  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:33 AM
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What is a Po Joe bird?


Great blue heron.
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  #47  
Old 09-02-2017, 06:46 PM
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Well thats a first ... Eating woodpeckers. I guess when you get right down to it, its all just meat.


There`s lots of birds that eat good. I`ve told elsewhere here in the past about Daddy and them thrashing robins. And Mama making bird pies for us. And also eating with the seasons. The South Georgia flatwoods were and still are full of food.
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  #48  
Old 09-02-2017, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Killdee View Post
I remember growing up,my Uncle Mutt calling a copperhead a pilot snake.He also told me the common water snake was a copperbelly and was deadly pissonous.
KD
I had a Uncle Mutt too... he was from the Roach side of my family.
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  #49  
Old 09-02-2017, 09:39 PM
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Yea, when I was a youngun I was showed a copperbelly and told that I wouldn`t make it from the pond to the house if I was ever bit by one. They was turrible pizen.
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  #50  
Old 09-05-2017, 03:24 PM
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The same here, Mr. Vernon. Around home nobody called em a copperhead either. It was always a highland moccasin.




Yea, speckled or white perch, and trout. Daddy said when he was little there were two kinds of those big woodpeckers. There was the "Lord God" woodpecker, and there was one that looked a lot like it called the wood hen. He said the Lord God woodpecker was a little bit bigger than the wood hen and had more white on its back. He also said there were a lot more wood hens than Lord Gods and they had different calls. He never heard the names Ivorybill and Pileated woodpeckers until I was a grown man and explained it to him.

He also said that they were both good to eat.
All the old timers around here call pileated woodpeckers "wood hens," too. And grandpa used to shoot 'em and eat 'em.

What I have heard called a pilot snake here is just a big, grayish color-phase copperhead. The old timers swore they were two different snakes. They also said hoop snakes would roll down a hill and chase you, and stick you with the deadly stinger on the ends of their tails; and that if you chopped a joint snake up, the pieces would crawl around until they found each other and would grow back together.
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