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  #51  
Old 10-02-2007, 10:12 PM
Vernon Holt Vernon Holt is offline
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Liklihood is great that these are merely piles of stones which were moved by way of a hand made sled (called a stone boat) out of the field and cast in piles at the edge of the field.

Every time the field was plowed, additional stones were brought to the surface, making for more stone removal. This was most often winter work when folks were not involved with making a crop.

I have an old field on my place that was being cultivated by Cherokees when whites settled in what is now Gilmer Co. The field was last cultivated in 1925.

The field now contains 30 inch in diameter pines and Yellow poplar. One would never know that it was a field except for the piles of rocks that delineate the the field. The rocks were placed in piles in event they were needed at some later time for building chimneys, foundations, fences, etc.
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  #52  
Old 10-02-2007, 10:31 PM
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Dawg2, I see a couple of worked pieces there. I know very little about Native American graves, other than the fact that I ain`t gonna mess with em. I like Mr. Vernons idea of how and why the stones were placed there. There are fields down here where the farmers have them piled 10 feet high for over 100 yards to get them out of the fields. I also see them in big woods off the sides of the right of ways some too. Most likely they were piled up in places like I see for the same reason.
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  #53  
Old 10-03-2007, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vernon Holt View Post
Liklihood is great that these are merely piles of stones which were moved by way of a hand made sled (called a stone boat) out of the field and cast in piles at the edge of the field.

Every time the field was plowed, additional stones were brought to the surface, making for more stone removal. This was most often winter work when folks were not involved with making a crop.

I have an old field on my place that was being cultivated by Cherokees when whites settled in what is now Gilmer Co. The field was last cultivated in 1925.

The field now contains 30 inch in diameter pines and Yellow poplar. One would never know that it was a field except for the piles of rocks that delineate the the field. The rocks were placed in piles in event they were needed at some later time for building chimneys, foundations, fences, etc.
Only one problem. It is not a field. The piles ONLY occur on the face of a hill and stop at the top and they are all on the eastern side. Some are just a few feet away. Additionally, every rock in the pile is milky quartz. There is no large milky quartz on my property. most of the rock here is granitic looking rock. So why would a farmer take all the effort to carry only white quartz to the top of a hill and make nearly identically sized piles a few feet apart from each other all the way across a ridge line? Also, nearly every single projectile point, scraper, tool, axe head found around my house is quartz or quartzite. I had someone look at some of them and they are a mix of Archaic and Woodland Period pieces. A lot of people may have farmer rock piles, and a lot more may be tearing up ancient artifact to border thier flower bed. The Archaic and more so the Woodland Indians built a lot of rock piles. ome are graves and others may only be a marker of some kind. White quartz was a very special/holy rock to the for the piezo electric qualities (go outside and rub to pieces of quartz together at night and you will see what I mean) and they built ahuge effigy mound (Eagle Rock) in GA completely out of quartz. But I would say if you find them, it would be better to err on the side off caution and not go tearing them up.

After having done a little research on "rock piles" after finding mine, An Archaeologist told me if it is on a ridge or hill, facing EAST (Land of the living), overlooking a valley that usually has water/ creek, it is most likely a prehistoric gravesite and usually well before the Creek Indians. More likely Archaic or Woodland.
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  #54  
Old 10-03-2007, 03:16 PM
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At Big Lazar Creek WMA, there are numerous piles of the same type rocks on several hills at the mouth of the creek where it flows into the Flint at Hickman Island.These piles are in a series of rows, coming together at the top of each hill. These hills are too rocky and steep for any farmer to have even considered planting a crop.If they are graves, there are a lot of dead Indians on those hills.I always wondered if it had some type of ceremony associated with it.
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Old 10-03-2007, 03:17 PM
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#1 I wasn't saying I'dig it up - just asking.
#2 That is not a grave site. It has a name but for lack of my memory I'll call it a supply pile. usable stones were carried from fields and creeks/rivers and piled high - like the back lot of a Home Depot. Then individuals could take them and use them as they saw fit.
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  #56  
Old 10-03-2007, 03:53 PM
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What about these rockpiles on a mtn top , facing NE. Sorry about the picture quality , I took them Sunday evening with my cell phone.
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  #57  
Old 10-03-2007, 04:04 PM
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When I found mine, I did a bunch of research. Yours look similar. Up the East Coast, there are groups ( http://rockpiles.blogspot.com/2007_06_24 _archive.html )dedicated to marking these piles as pre historic and they have a lot of pics. GA has a lot of rockpiles. But from what I have read, there is a big debate as to whether they are graves, ceremonial locations, monuments to fallen warriors, battle ground markers, so on. Some of my mounds face NE, but there are none on the western side of the hill. But there is one big marker cairn made completely out of granite looking rock with one single piece of white quartz stuck in it. From that pile is a trail of white quartz chunks about 10' apart leading you to the big area of rock piles, which is why I do not believe it ha sanything to do with a farmer. We find a lot of artifacts int the pasture below, but none from more modern Indians (i.e.- Cherokee).
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  #58  
Old 10-03-2007, 08:49 PM
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W.P.A.
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  #59  
Old 10-03-2007, 09:54 PM
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Here are some graves I found at a friend's new lease....

No Indian graves but from the 1800....Headstones said some were in the GA Infantry..
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  #60  
Old 10-03-2007, 09:56 PM
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Another one
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  #61  
Old 10-03-2007, 10:13 PM
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Hey Dawg2----

I'd say that is a machette in your picture. Not sure what era, but i'm pretty sure that's what you go there. Looks to be in real good condition though.
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  #62  
Old 10-04-2007, 09:26 AM
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Hey Dawg2----

I'd say that is a machette in your picture. Not sure what era, but i'm pretty sure that's what you go there. Looks to be in real good condition though.
It is. I keep one in the hunting house, the garage, and I have one in the woods too, it was from the 60's. Now if I can just find it in the woods. They are great to have in the woods.
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  #63  
Old 10-05-2007, 06:25 PM
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they look like farmers put them there i am pretty shure there not a burrial site
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  #64  
Old 10-07-2007, 09:48 PM
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Some folks have been PM'ing me asking for some pics of the grave sites. I was hunting this weekend and stopped by the old slave grave yard and took these pics with my camera phone. Sorry the quality isn't the best, next time I'll take a real camera and get some better shots.

These pictures don't begin to tell the whole story when you are there. There are approximately 60 of these graves lined up on the ridge top. I tried to pick some representative samples. In the big picture, you can see the headstone and the footstone and the depression in the ground from where the coffin has collapsed. The first picture of the headstone might have some kind of engraving on it, but it's illegible. I'll try and get some pictures of the Creek Indian graves I mentioned earlier one of these times.
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  #65  
Old 10-07-2007, 10:42 PM
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WOW I just wonder how many times i have walkd past some of these and never noticed them
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Old 10-07-2007, 11:09 PM
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WOW I just wonder how many times i have walkd past some of these and never noticed them
Yep, the property owner did not know they were there, and this hunting club I am in has been together about 6 years and no one noticed them before I joined last season. It just struck me one morning as I climbed out of a creek bottom and crested the ridge, that the stones and depressions in the ground were in a definite geometric pattern. There are 10 rows of 6 to 8 graves each. It is very old because there are some big trees growing up right through the middle of some of the graves.

I suspect that there was an old log church there at one time because churches and graveyards usually go together, and at one end of the rows of graves there is a level area where the church might have stood.
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  #67  
Old 02-09-2011, 12:14 AM
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Default Hall county indian pile

I have found a pile of rocks 4X6 on a very steep and east side of the hill overlooking a creek. I have found about 30 arrowheads on my land in the last twenty years. Makes me wonder as well.
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  #68  
Old 02-13-2011, 11:25 PM
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Our cabin is out on a side ridge that faces East and theres 2 rock piles further out the ridge.
Mostly quartz stones.
I walk around them when goin thru.
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Old 02-13-2011, 11:44 PM
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I see very few actual artifacts and a bunch of old farm rock piles in this thread.
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  #70  
Old 02-14-2011, 08:10 AM
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I see very few actual artifacts and a bunch of old farm rock piles in this thread.
See, that is where you are wrong. One of the piles I have had been vandalized and there were artifacts.
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  #71  
Old 02-14-2011, 08:39 AM
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Not saying the rock piles are not Indian graves but around me are several grave yards with rock piles in them marking grave sites.These were from people marking there love ones site that didn't have money for a fit marker.They are very old too.I think from the early 1900's.Some of what different members are posting could also be the same.As far as the sites facing the east,we Christians believe that when Jesus returns He will come from the east. All graves around my home town face the east.The rock sites could be from the early settlers also.Just some thoughts to consider.
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  #72  
Old 08-17-2011, 03:21 PM
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grab a shovel.
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  #73  
Old 08-17-2011, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by BoneHunter77 View Post
grab a shovel.
Not cool and you may want to read up:

http://www.ibsgwatch.imagedjinn.com/learn/laws.htm
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  #74  
Old 08-17-2011, 06:56 PM
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There was a property I went to years ago in Cohutta, Ga. that in a field around the sides of a ridge were not stone piles, but stone pits sort of. Circles about 30 feet in diameter covered with stones averaging the size of a football/ basketball. The center of the stone circle was about four feet lower than the edge. The owner said that one day he and some friends started to remove stones form the center, got down about 8 feet and there were still stones- they put the ones removed back and never fooled with it again.
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  #75  
Old 08-21-2011, 02:52 AM
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if those are graves more than likely any bones would have since disolved except for the teeth, enamel is the hardest substance in out body. Not all indian were burial laying stretched out, alot were bundle burials put in the hole after the bones were cleaned in the charnel house. there were hundreds of thousands of people here before us, they had to be put to rest somehwere and most places today have no resemblence to what it looked like that long ago.

Also note, not all indians were buried with riches and pots and gorgets or even plain ole arrowheads.They just dies and were interred. Down here in Florida our soils are so acidic bones dont last. Late Paleo and Archaic indians buried the dead in ponds and lakes here, they covered and staked them to the bottom and it would be used for thousands of years until the mound builders came along in the woodland times.

you want a great read?? check out the link of the Windover site, this has the best preservation of 7,000 year old human brain and tissue and these "savages" even cared for a 14 year old boy with SPina Bifida and made cloth shirts like we wear from palmetto fibers, 26 strands to the square inch.

http://www.nbbd.com/godo/history/windover/

I have found some bundled, staked burials before when the lakes go down. I have given the Arch`s some sites but they dont need them all, all they would do is take any related artifacts and it goes in to a box in a drawer somewhere for eternity. I know of at least 6 mounds that arent documented and they will remain that way until a developer comes along and bulldozes it.
The Seminoles have no say over any remains discovered here, they arent true Florida indians, they are a mixture of creek and cherokee and freed slaves .

See what is in one of those piles to fill your curiosity and if it is a burial cover it back up and now you know.

Last edited by jcinpc; 08-21-2011 at 09:16 AM.
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