GON Magazine | GON Classifieds

Go Back   Georgia Outdoor News Forum > Firearms > Muzzleloading
Notices



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old 07-10-2017, 07:01 PM
NCHillbilly's Avatar
NCHillbilly NCHillbilly is offline
Administrator
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Smoky Mountains
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
No, it`s stupid and a cheap and lazy way out.


If a weapon has fiberglass, iron, or steel on it, it`s not primitive. Not even my beloved traditional muzzleloaders and bows.

Primitive weapons are made of wood, stone, bone, antler, ivory, horn, shell.
But, Nic-you know it puts undue hardship on the poor people if they have to pour powder and a bullet down the barrel of a gun, and can't shoot deer at 200 yards. That's just barbaric during muzzleloader season.
__________________
Son, I ain't sayin' what's right or wrong, I'm just sayin' how it is.....Black Oak Arkansas
My uncle came running when he heard us screaming and pulled the monkey off me.....Fish Hawk
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-11-2017, 08:28 AM
ripplerider's Avatar
ripplerider ripplerider is offline
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: North Ga. mtns
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

I wish I could still hunt with my New Englander I love the way it carries. Unfortunately I can no longer see through open sights well enough to hunt with it. A few years ago I was offered a no-brainer deal on a Traditions Pursuit with several boxes of Hornady sabots, shotgun primers and some Buckhorn 209 powder all for the staggering price of $100! couldnt pass it up. Put a fixed 4 power scope on it. I've killed quite a few deer with it and a bear. The trigger pull is not great even after a trigger job. I'd like to find a peep sight for my New Englander and start using it again. Dad has a Cherokee .45 caliber that is light as a feather maybe I'll trade him out of it and re-sight it. I bet it doesnt weigh 5 lbs. I love measuring out powder I've never used pellets I hear their a little harder to ignite. I've never had a failure to fire with any of my muzzleloaders knock on wood.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-11-2017, 03:17 PM
Gbr5pb's Avatar
Gbr5pb Gbr5pb is offline
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Jasper
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

I had too many of those things go snap with a good deer standing there! Like the kaboom of a 209 primer and old eyes like a scope! To each his own though
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-11-2017, 07:17 PM
NCHillbilly's Avatar
NCHillbilly NCHillbilly is offline
Administrator
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Smoky Mountains
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gbr5pb View Post
I had too many of those things go snap with a good deer standing there! Like the kaboom of a 209 primer and old eyes like a scope! To each his own though
Learning how to operate it solves that problem. An inline is absolutely no more dependable than a sidelock, they just require different strategies. And you have to know your rifle. I have never had mine go snap on a deer after learning how to use it, even hunting in pouring rain; except for once when I had a dud cap with no pop stuff in it.

I have had my sidelock go off in pouring rain more than once when my buddy's inline with 209s wouldn't-it's all about how you handle it.
__________________
Son, I ain't sayin' what's right or wrong, I'm just sayin' how it is.....Black Oak Arkansas
My uncle came running when he heard us screaming and pulled the monkey off me.....Fish Hawk
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-12-2017, 03:40 AM
Darkhorse's Avatar
Darkhorse Darkhorse is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Hawkinsville Ga.
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCHillbilly View Post
Learning how to operate it solves that problem. An inline is absolutely no more dependable than a sidelock, they just require different strategies. And you have to know your rifle. I have never had mine go snap on a deer after learning how to use it, even hunting in pouring rain; except for once when I had a dud cap with no pop stuff in it.

I have had my sidelock go off in pouring rain more than once when my buddy's inline with 209s wouldn't-it's all about how you handle it.
"You have to know your rifle." Best quote of the year in my opinion.
I consider my flintlocks to be more dependable than my old caplock and it was one of the good ones.
I literally can't remember the last time one of them failed to go off. But I do remember others in the past that did sometimes fail to fire. The difference is the time spent shooting and learning how to really shoot a flintlock and how to make it better.
Both of my rifles were built by me over 10 years ago. This year I did a super slick lock tune on each one and added simple peep sights to help my aging eyes. There are a number of small things that improve the performance of the old flintlock.
Here's a couple of little things you can do, after you oil your bore turn the rifle upside down for a week or so then back rightside up. Make this a process. All the oil eventually runs down and can contaminate both touchhole and flash channel. Sometimes you can see the oil through the touchhole.
Don't over lubricate the lock internals. This oil also migrates and some of it ends up in the pan and between the bolster and barrel. If a lock is properly tuned you don't need oil on the lockplate in the first place. I use a little grease where the mainspring contacts the tumbler. Also a little grease where the sear spring contacts the sear. And a touch more where the frizzen nose contacts the frizzen spring.
I coat the round part of the tumbler where it goes through the lockplate with a thin layer of grease also.
Using a q tip I dip it in oil, I use Delco synthetic for this, and just touch the notches in the tumbler.
And that's all my flinters need.
Before any deer hunt I remove the lock and wipe off any oil from the lockplate and bolster with alcohol and patch. I do the same thing for the pan, the flint (bottom especially), the underside of the frizzen and the face of the frizzen. Point is to remove any oil that might possibly cause a misfire.
Following these simple steps will decrease and maybe eliminate those misfires.
__________________
He who is untrue to the past is recreant to the present and faithless to the future.
Sallie Pickett widow of Maj. General George E. Pickett
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 07-12-2017, 04:38 AM
Gbr5pb's Avatar
Gbr5pb Gbr5pb is offline
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Jasper
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Yep but my muzzleloader started as a broke 18 year old with a cheap cva kit that we never quite got put together right! And my friend sighting his in with truck headlights were we could go on altoona and blue ridge hunts back in the 80s like y'all professional hunters! We didn't hurt much but we had fun!
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-12-2017, 07:25 AM
NCHillbilly's Avatar
NCHillbilly NCHillbilly is offline
Administrator
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Smoky Mountains
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gbr5pb View Post
Yep but my muzzleloader started as a broke 18 year old with a cheap cva kit that we never quite got put together right! And my friend sighting his in with truck headlights were we could go on altoona and blue ridge hunts back in the 80s like y'all professional hunters! We didn't hurt much but we had fun!
Sounds like the way I started with blackpowder! Those were the days, weren't they? And I'm about as far from a professional hunter as you can get.
__________________
Son, I ain't sayin' what's right or wrong, I'm just sayin' how it is.....Black Oak Arkansas
My uncle came running when he heard us screaming and pulled the monkey off me.....Fish Hawk
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-12-2017, 11:52 AM
Muldoon's Avatar
Muldoon Muldoon is offline
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Backside of nowhere
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

You only learn as much from a rifle.....as the time you're willing to spend with it!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-14-2017, 03:09 PM
lampern lampern is offline
Join Date: May 2014
Location: North Carolina
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
No, it`s stupid and a cheap and lazy way out.


If a weapon has fiberglass, iron, or steel on it, it`s not primitive. Not even my beloved traditional muzzleloaders and bows.

Primitive weapons are made of wood, stone, bone, antler, ivory, horn, shell.
Actually I see no reason for any kind of primitive or muzzleloading seasons any more.

But thats just me.

Heck in GA kids can use any legal weapon while adults are restricted to bows and muzzleloaders.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004 Georgia Outdoor News, Inc.Ad Management by RedTyger