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Old 04-16-2018, 08:07 AM
josh chatham josh chatham is offline
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Hey guys this isnt really a food plot question but it is about land management. I am thinking about buying some property in the near future with roughly 40 acres of planted loblly pines on it. The pines are between 36-48" in diameter. They are between 70-80' tall. We are planning on thinning these pines as soon as we buy. Does anyone have any idea what these pines might go for? They are healthy trees and we would probably thin out 1/3 of the trees. Thanks for any help you can give.
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Old 04-16-2018, 08:26 AM
jakebuddy jakebuddy is offline
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Timber is bought by the ton, depending on the product and whether it is natural wood or planted, how stocked it is meaning trees per acre. There are a lot of variables that will determine the product. If your unsure how it all works call the forestry commission pretty sure they can give you guidance for free, no offence to anyone but I know some real shady timber buyers like politician shady.
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Old 04-16-2018, 11:04 AM
josh chatham josh chatham is offline
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Thanks for the input Jake! I am very ignorant when it comes to timber and selling timber. Would it be worth it to get a timber broker involved?
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Old 04-16-2018, 11:16 AM
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I would highly recommend you find a good timber consultant. A good one will more than earn his comission by finding you the best deal for your timber in your area. They know the market, potential buyers and crews to do the work.
Contact local Forest Service office for list of consultants. Talk with a forester to get a feel for who to deal with and who to avoid. Usually you can get them to walk through the property and provide you insight into what you have and what you might ex
Do your home work.
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Old 04-16-2018, 11:25 AM
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Miguel Cervantes Miguel Cervantes is offline
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http://www.gfc.state.ga.us/resources...yourtimber.pdf

http://www.gfc.state.ga.us/forest-ma...ning/index.cfm
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Old 04-16-2018, 12:21 PM
josh chatham josh chatham is offline
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Thanks for the replies everybody!
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeShu View Post
I would highly recommend you find a good timber consultant. A good one will more than earn his comission by finding you the best deal for your timber in your area. They know the market, potential buyers and crews to do the work.
Contact local Forest Service office for list of consultants. Talk with a forester to get a feel for who to deal with and who to avoid. Usually you can get them to walk through the property and provide you insight into what you have and what you might ex
Do your home work.
George is spot on. A consulting forester will get you top dollar. Only input I will add is with trees in the 36" plus diameter size, I'd consider a total harvest and replant. If your trees are truly 36" and more in DBH, they are well beyond mature harvest age.
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josh chatham View Post
Hey guys this isnt really a food plot question but it is about land management. I am thinking about buying some property in the near future with roughly 40 acres of planted loblly pines on it. The pines are between 36-48" in diameter. They are between 70-80' tall. We are planning on thinning these pines as soon as we buy. Does anyone have any idea what these pines might go for? They are healthy trees and we would probably thin out 1/3 of the trees. Thanks for any help you can give.
If the Diameter of the trees are averaging even half what you posted, it's well past time to clear cut and reforest. Thinning a stand of that size/age class isn't a productive silvicultural practice.

If you don't have a trusted contact who's knowledgeable in regards to procurement forestry? You'd be better off with using a highly recommended timber consultant to develop a viable timber harvest and reforestation plan for your site that matches your longterm aesthetic, recreation and timber production goals.
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Old 04-16-2018, 07:42 PM
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Yep, I'd cut them all if there that big. Their days are numbered.
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:04 PM
josh chatham josh chatham is offline
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Thanks for all the input! Well I got some not so good news yesterday. I talked with 3 forestry consultants yesterday and every one of them said that up in that area pine is basically worthless. One guy told me that he is getting only $3.25 a ton for pine. May have made my decision to not get that property. The main reason I want to buy land is to ALWAYS have a place to hunt. I hunt NF here in North GA and have a good bit of private I can get on as well but Ive always dreamed of having my own place. But, I also have to make it where I can make a little on it if I ever needed too. Thanks again for the info. Hopefully something will come up soon.
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Old 04-17-2018, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josh chatham View Post
Thanks for all the input! Well I got some not so good news yesterday. I talked with 3 forestry consultants yesterday and every one of them said that up in that area pine is basically worthless. One guy told me that he is getting only $3.25 a ton for pine. May have made my decision to not get that property. The main reason I want to buy land is to ALWAYS have a place to hunt. I hunt NF here in North GA and have a good bit of private I can get on as well but Ive always dreamed of having my own place. But, I also have to make it where I can make a little on it if I ever needed too. Thanks again for the info. Hopefully something will come up soon.
What county are you referring too?
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Old 04-18-2018, 07:53 AM
jakebuddy jakebuddy is offline
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Did they look at the property, those are terrible prices you could always watch the prices they go up and down all year. Plus with large trees you have more tonnage even for pulpwood prices. Talk to a forester not someone that buys timber.
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:14 AM
josh chatham josh chatham is offline
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What county are you referring too?
Looking at Houston County TN
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Old 04-19-2018, 09:22 AM
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It ain't what it used to be. 30 years ago, and idle pasture planted in pine trees was a great idea. Paper recycling, newspaper circulation down and massive imports of timber from Canada has really driven down the price of pulp wood. Using a timber broker is the best way to get your timber harvested and to market, but don't expect a HUGE ROI. Lots of $$$ in the harvesters equipment along with insurance plus the broker has to get his cut too. You may agree to sell the timber today, but they may not harvest it for 3, 6, or more months to get the best price for all. Not a lot of timber processing plants around like it used to be, so your timber may have to be trucked halfway across the state to a mill that has capacity which cuts into your profits. Then there are droughts that can increase chances of pine beetles which means cutting out the dead trees and the live ones immediately around them. And then there is the "mess" left after the cut since they don't chip the limbs and "ends" that are cut to fit on a trailer. When we do our final cut on our 66 acres of planted pines in the next 10-12 years, really considering going back to pasture and leasing the land for growing hay, or maybe a cell tower or solar panel farm. Just the way the market has evolved. Good luck.
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Old 04-19-2018, 01:18 PM
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Yeah its all about location and distance from the mills. I think the OP (Josh) now realizes his trees aren't in high demand for the area. I still think Timber is a good investment if your in the right area. I replanted 110 acres of pine trees last year with an input cost of around 25K to 26K. I fully expect to generate 2500 to 3000 an acre in the next 25 years with proper upkeep and burning just on those 110 acres. I hope my thin in 12-15 years covers my investment cost and then the final cut will be sawtimber or chip and saw prices.

I just saw a timber bid from a neighbor on 70 acres and the highest bid was over 160K. Average bids were around 130 to 140K. If I only generate 2000 an acre on the trees that's still a rate of return of over 10%. Its hard to get 10% and be able to see it, touch it, and enjoy it. There is a risk of beetles, ice storms etc but there's also risks in any investment that may generate a good return.
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