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  #26  
Old 06-18-2017, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by NCHillbilly View Post
After seeing the last pics, I'm pretty sure it's swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor.)
I know that you know your stuff but I'm going to have to disagree on this one. Google Durand oak and look at the leaf and bark structure. Also read what it is also known as and why.
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Old 06-18-2017, 09:49 PM
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After seeing the last pics, I'm pretty sure it's swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor.)
I'm not sure you weren't on track with the sand post oak...(maybe a hybrid?). Sand post oak tends to have a lot of the acorn overcupped, & because it stays small it could explain why this one has acorns on a small tree. I assumed it was producing at a young age, but it could well be a dwarf tree.

That bark is weird though.
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Old 06-18-2017, 09:59 PM
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Thanks for the insight and help. My id was a post oak, as some of you have suggested. However, as Elkbane made mention, young trees can fool you; hence, me asking for advice from the great knowledge base here!!!!!
Across the river...No the farm is definitely not close to a residential area. The farm has been in my family since the early 40's and most definitely rural (wouldn't have it any other way).
Davexx1 and ForestGrump...I will let them grow for now. I will definitely keep an eye on the one with acorns and hopefully be able to get a more accurate id.
I will also take a few more pictures, including the bark. I am also going to put fencing around each tree so the deer do not tear them up!!!
Forest Grump...I have propagated several things. However, you taught me something. I never knew you could propagate an oak...
I will certainly try!!!
I'll update this thread as the year progresses and the acorns continue to develop.
When I suggested propagating it, I didn't mean grafting or cloning (any plant can be cloned in the lab with asexual technique); I really intended to convey keeping it & planting the acorns to grow more trees instead of cutting it down. If it is a hybrid you might never get another like it, it could even be infertile. I have never tried to graft an oak, but I suspect if it worked there'd be a bunch of folks using it. Sorry for any confusion.

Would like to see those acorns later... if they stay overcupped, cut it if your primary goal is wildlife.
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  #29  
Old 06-19-2017, 10:35 AM
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I know that you know your stuff but I'm going to have to disagree on this one. Google Durand oak and look at the leaf and bark structure. Also read what it is also known as and why.
It's certainly possible, but I'm not convinced. If so, that's listed as a rare tree in Georgia, particularly that area of Georgia. On the other hand, there are a lot of trees down that way in the deeper south that I am not familiar with at all, like I am with the ones in my area.

I wouldn't be surprised if it's a hybrid, either.

It's very hard to id obscure trees 100% from a couple pictures. We would have to key it out to know for sure.
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  #30  
Old 06-19-2017, 10:58 AM
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I'm going with the Durand Oak as well. It is in the white oak family, and the champion tree for the USA is in Georgia. It's rare to have acorns at that age for any white oak variety.
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