; Elk and Antelope caliber - Page 3 - Georgia Outdoor News Forum
 


GON Magazine | GON Classifieds

Go Back   Georgia Outdoor News Forum > Deer and Small Game Hunting and Trail Cams > General Hunting


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 01-03-2018, 09:24 AM
Rainmaker Rainmaker is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Georgia
iTrader: (14) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkhorse View Post
Rainmaker, that's the best, most intelligent reply yet from someone who hasn't been there. You have given it a lot of thought.
After my first hunt with a 7mm mag. I bought a stainless synthetic .300 WM with a muzzlebreak and shot several hundred rounds through it before my next trip.
While it's true one might see an elk at 20 yards and kill it with a good old .30.30, I personally have never had a blind, dumb elk do that for me. Mine have been shot at 300 yards and beyond, and a range finder can be a great asset.
Those who think an elk isn't that tough to kill simply hasn't been in on the kill of enough elk to have formed a realistic judgement.
Why would someone buy a hunting weapon based on the advice of a person who says "I've never hunted elk, but......" Really? Your going to arm yourself for a hunt that might cost 7 to $10,000 based on that type advice??
Darkhorse, thank you for the compliment.

Again, my ideas are just a rough draft. I'm sure after talking with a guide I would tweak it here or there.

I don't plan on spending $7K to $10K door to door for a guided elk hunt to grab my Ruger m77 .270 with a 22" barrel out of the safe.

If I'm spending that much what's another $1K in my opinion.
__________________
Everyone has a story. Some are better than others.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 01-03-2018, 09:44 AM
Rainmaker Rainmaker is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Georgia
iTrader: (14) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by godogs57 View Post
You have some nice ideas there, but some will have a hard time working out there.

#1: 300Win mag is fine. 26” barrel is a little long and won’t give you any more real world velocity than a 24”barrel would. Add a 3”muzzle break to it and the problem worsens in two ways...your barrel will be unwieldy long for hunting timber, plus no one will want to be anywhere around you when the gun goes off. Most elk hunts do not transpire like TV hunts do, especially the long range shows. You will more than likely be working timber all morning long, up till lunch. 200 yard shot opportunities may happen, but so will 40 yard shots. When it happens, it will happen in a matter of a second or two....that’s it. “Bull! Nice one! Shoot!” Add a second to that conversation and there you have your average shot scenario. Determine if he’s a shooter, mentally calculate a rough estimate of range, what’s my holdover at that range? Where’s a rest I can shoot off of? Where is he now? There! Bang. All that took place in two seconds. That scenario has happened to me several times. Matter of fact, it’s a carbon copy of my 2014 bull, and my 2015 bull. Maybe not quite two seconds on the 14 bull....maybe two seconds at the most on the 2015.

You don’t have time to fiddle with Mil rads on a scope, twist dials, go to prone after you extend your bipod legs, check wind direction and speed, put on earmuffs that are back in your pack right now......it just doesn’t work that way in real world elk hunting.

Afternoon elk hunt where you’re perched over a nice park? Might work, but you may have to pick up and move. Now your plan might get compromised if you have to move, but basically the same thing here as in your morning hunt.

For as much $ as you’d spend on the Nightforce scope, I’d replace it with a good (as good as you can afford) hunting scope. They will gather light better and get the job done. Think: Swarovski, Schmidt & Bender, top end Leupold. Better suited for elk.

If your hunt is guided, the guide will make you remove the muzzle brake anyway. “Take off that brake before we start hunting Mr Smith....I’m not getting my eardrums busted out this week. Thank you....” Heard that everywhere I’ve hunted that had guides.

2: can’t argue about much there except the muzzle break would have to go.

Best pair of boots? Agree, but they must be broken in! Add good merino wool socks to that as well. My new boots arrive in April or May and get worn all summer long before my hunts. Imperative!

I wish you the best of luck on a future hunt.
godogs57,

My ideas are just an outline, and I would draw on the experience from hunters like yourself to tweak my plan.

The Nightforce SHV F1 4-14 x 50 is illuminated. The reticle is uncluttered and very useful. I would retain my opinion on using this scope. The center illumination is superior to whole reticle illumination IMO, and at only $1250 it's a good buy - and can be caught on sale sometimes.

The mil reticle would function just like a duplex at any range just like you recommended; however, if a perfect scenario presented itself at 400 yards and I had time to dial for distance at least I have that option.

I wouldn't take a bipod - unneeded weight when I could just use my backpack to rest the rifle on if needed.

If a good spotting scope isn't needed, I would still plan to take a great set of binos.

I'd cancel the muzzle brake based on your recommendation. I would practice with it, and then zero without it if needed prior to the hunt.

I'd keep the 26" barrel on the antelope rifle and ditch the brake as you recommended.

I'm kinda up in the air on 24" vs 26" barrel on the magnum. I think a properly balanced and fitted rifle is way more important in handling than 2" of barrel.

Which is why in the beginning I stated a longer barrel. I would need a custom or semi-custom rifle. A 22" off-the-shelf sporter just won't do.

I bet if I go out there with what I think is the "best prepared plan" I would come back with ideas to do something different the next time around.
__________________
Everyone has a story. Some are better than others.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 01-03-2018, 11:06 AM
NCMTNHunter's Avatar
NCMTNHunter NCMTNHunter is offline
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: NC
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainmaker View Post
godogs57,

My ideas are just an outline, and I would draw on the experience from hunters like yourself to tweak my plan.

The Nightforce SHV F1 4-14 x 50 is illuminated. The reticle is uncluttered and very useful. I would retain my opinion on using this scope. The center illumination is superior to whole reticle illumination IMO, and at only $1250 it's a good buy - and can be caught on sale sometimes.

The mil reticle would function just like a duplex at any range just like you recommended; however, if a perfect scenario presented itself at 400 yards and I had time to dial for distance at least I have that option.

I wouldn't take a bipod - unneeded weight when I could just use my backpack to rest the rifle on if needed.

If a good spotting scope isn't needed, I would still plan to take a great set of binos.

I'd cancel the muzzle brake based on your recommendation. I would practice with it, and then zero without it if needed prior to the hunt.

I'd keep the 26" barrel on the antelope rifle and ditch the brake as you recommended.

I'm kinda up in the air on 24" vs 26" barrel on the magnum. I think a properly balanced and fitted rifle is way more important in handling than 2" of barrel.

Which is why in the beginning I stated a longer barrel. I would need a custom or semi-custom rifle. A 22" off-the-shelf sporter just won't do.

I bet if I go out there with what I think is the "best prepared plan" I would come back with ideas to do something different the next time around.
All this is very reasonable for an elk hunt. I would however reconsider the need for a bipod or tripod. Not the kind that mounts on your gun but the kind you can carry or pack (bog pod, stoney point, triggersticks, ...). I have been fortunate enough to kill five bulls now and none of them gave me the opportunity to shoot prone from a pack. Vegetation on the ground or terrain just didn't allow for it. You will also want them to prop your binos on for long glassing sessions. I shot all five using the stoney point bipods. I don't remember the size but they will work for standing or sitting shots. Since my last hunt I have bought a tripod and bino holders that I will use on my next hunt.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 01-03-2018, 05:22 PM
Darkhorse's Avatar
Darkhorse Darkhorse is offline
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Hawkinsville Ga.
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Keep in mind that the conditions and requirements for a Elk hunt will change based on location and time of year.
My first bull was killed still hunting solo in the dark timber of the Uncompahgre Plateu in Colorado. I was hunting with my old Model 700 BDL in 7mm mag. I shot my bull at no more than 30 yards.
On the other end of the spectrum I did a late season hunt out of Chama New Mexico in mid November. We had deep snow and the elk had moved to the lower ranches out of the timber. These were private ranches used for grazing with large pastures with groups of cedars interspersed through out. The ranges were long. Sometimes out of range. On this hunt the last morning of the last day we glassed a bull from a mile or so away, he was heading off the ranch towards a timbered slope bordering the ranch. To head him off we had to run, trot, walk fast, run some more...... I was younger and in excellent shape but finally I gave up hope. I was trudging up a slope bordering the ranch when my guide ahead of me started gesturing frantically. I ran up the slope to see the bull walking through knee deep bushes. The guide whistled and I shot him with my 7mm breaking him down. I finished him with a neck shot at 20 yards. From my ejected shell we stepped off 285 yards.
Then in NW Colorado I was carrying my .300 WM Browning with a BOSS and Leupold 3.5X10. Here the terrain was broken, rugged and open. Only a few trees for cover. This was longer range hunting. I shot my bull here at 400 yards according to the guide who had lasered the other side of the draw. I was standing using a limb on a cedar for a rest. Complete pass thru of both shoulders.
As for the muzzle break the guide just stuck his fingers in his ears.
It's my hunt. I would never remove my muzzlebreak when told to by guide or outfitter. I'm not sneaking it by them, they already know it's there, so they should prepare themselves. However in the dark timber I would carry another rifle because that break gets real loud with the woods all around.
__________________
He who is untrue to the past is recreant to the present and faithless to the future.
Sallie Pickett widow of Maj. General George E. Pickett

Last edited by Darkhorse; 01-03-2018 at 08:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 01-03-2018, 05:24 PM
godogs57's Avatar
godogs57 godogs57 is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South GA
iTrader: (3) Check/Add Feedback
Default

I’ve used trigger sticks and Bog Pods on my elk hunts and ended up leaving em back at the truck. Hunting parks in the evening might give you time to use em. I’ve never shot a bull from prone except one time (2014), but, rather use tree limbs and such while standing or kneeling. As far as “dialing in” a bull at 400 yards, I’d suggest practicing with your rifle. My 6x7 I got this year was at 342 yards, laser confirmed afterwards, and he was checking out the ladies. He was not stationary except for my moment where I pulled the trigger, same as my 2015 bull. I got him at 300+ yards, laser confirmed afterwards. It’s just not like TV...TV shots do happen folks, but more often they don’t, by a wide margin! My Sako 338 is sighted in 3” high at 100 yards, which will put it on target to about 300 yards...any further and I hold high on the shoulder and drop the shot in there.

My opinions are just mine, of course. That’s why they make Fords and Chevys! Your choice for a good set of binocs is money in the bank. Buy the best you can...save your pennies and get a pair a little better once you make your choice! It’s that important.

NCMtnhunter and Darkhorse have some excellent points as well. In the end, choose what works for you. Take your gear and climb a few hills with your equipment, practice shot scenarios. Then sit back and question yourself on matters of importance. You might change your mind on something or, tell yourself “yep, I’m good to go.”

Best of luck! Get in the best shape of your life. Charging up a hill at 11,000 feet to get set up for a shot is not for everyone.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 01-09-2018, 01:22 AM
zedex's Avatar
zedex zedex is offline
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: on the wet coast
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

MY first canadian kill was with a 270win.. it was a moose at 200 yards. One shot kill. Double lung.
Ive taken moose and elk with the 270. My last elk was with a 1941 303 british.
The 270 took elk with 140gr. The 303, 180gr.
The 270 or 308.. either will work with ease.
__________________
Producing the brightest idea in lures ever.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004 Georgia Outdoor News, Inc.Ad Management by RedTyger