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  #1  
Old 04-10-2008, 04:43 PM
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Default How to kill parvo in the yard?-UPDATED!!

***UPDATE!!!****

Sasha is 100% better and the Shelter she was adopted from has been exposed!!!
http://www.myfoxcolorado.com/myfox/p...Y&pageId=3.1.1


-------------------------------------------------

Not ours...

Friend of ours out in CO has just had thier pup come down with parvo. She;s doin better this AM, thank God. He was asking about treating their yard to help it from possibly happening again or infecting other dogs that might come into the area.

So is there anything that can be done?

Last edited by SnowHunter; 04-29-2008 at 03:50 PM. Reason: title
  #2  
Old 04-10-2008, 04:46 PM
Darcy Darcy is offline
 
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bleach lots of bleach.


even so far as the bottoms of the shoes that have been in the yard.

throw the food/water bowls away, its not worth the risk.

that is one tough thing to get rid of. Just don't put anymore pets at risk, its not worth it. Warn other pet owners that parvo has existed in immediate area... I'd wanna know for sure.
  #3  
Old 04-10-2008, 04:54 PM
RackNBeardOutdoors RackNBeardOutdoors is offline
 
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I think there is some 7 year rule if a dog has died, but I can't remember exactly
  #4  
Old 04-10-2008, 04:56 PM
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well they don't wanna wait 7 years, this just happened yesterday.
  #5  
Old 04-10-2008, 05:11 PM
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You need to mix a water and bleach formula of about 32 parts water to one part bleach (1/2 Cup bleach to 1 gallon water) and spray everything in the yard house car or any other place you can think of that the dog came in contact with your shoes rugs bowls furniture etc.
The Parvo Virus can live for approx 1 year indoors and maybe a little less outdoors but don't take the chance.
I lost a Lab pup at 5 1/2 month's last year to parvo virus after he had recieved all three parvo vaccinations.
My vet and Vaccine mfg gave me instructions on how to rid my home, car and yard of this virus.
I have a new pup that will whelp around the 15th of April and will not be brought home until his second parvo vaccination (Around 9 weeks). Just to play it safe. I have sprayed my yard, house car, dog crate, clothes and everthing else that I can think of twice to insure the health of my new pup.

Here is some more info on the deadly killer of dogs

Parvovirus
Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.


Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus disease is currently the most common infectious disorder of dogs in the United States.
'Parvo' is a highly contagious disease characterized by diarrhea that is often bloody and is caused by a pathogen called canine parvovirus, Type 2 (CPV-2). In 1980, the original strain of CPV-2 was replaced by CPV-2A and in 1986, another variation called CPV-2B appeared. Today, CPV-2B has largely replaced the previous strains as the most common isolate. Since all of these strains are similar, we will lump them together and refer to them as CPV-2 (parvo). There is currently some discussion that there may be other strains that are beginning to emerge and have yet to be formally identified. Current vaccinations have helped to control the spread of this disease but despite being vaccinated, some dogs still contract and die from parvo. There is much that we do not know about the virus or the best way to control the disease, but we are learning new information daily. Misinformation about the disease, its spread, and vaccination is widespread in both breeding and veterinary circles. We hope that with a better understanding of the disease, pet owners will be able to make good husbandry decisions that will help prevent and reduce the spread of this disease.

How is parvo spread?

CPV-2 is known to survive on inanimate objects - such as clothing, food pans, and cage floors - for 5 months and longer in the right conditions. Insects and rodents may also serve as vectors playing an important role in the transmission of the disease. All parvoviruses are extremely stable and are resistant to adverse environmental influences such as low pH and high heat. Exposure to ultraviolet light and sodium hypochlorite (a 1:32 dilution of household bleach - ˝ cup bleach to 1 gallon of water) can inactivate parvovirus. The bleach solution can be impaired by organic matter and needs to have adequate exposure time and proper concentrations to work effectively. The normal incubation period (time from exposure to the virus to the time when signs of disease appear) is from 7-14 days. Active excretion of the virus in the feces can begin the third day after exposure, often before clinical signs appear, and may last for one to two weeks after the onset of the disease.

Symptoms

There is a broad range in the severity of symptoms shown by dogs that are infected with parvovirus. Many adult dogs exposed to the virus show very few if any symptoms. The majority of cases are seen in dogs less than 6 months of age, with the most severe cases seen in puppies younger than 12 weeks of age. There are also significant differences in response to CPV-2 infections and vaccines among different breeds of dogs, with Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, and Labrador Retrievers being more susceptible than other breeds.

The most common form of the disease is the intestinal form known as enteritis. CPV-2 enteritis is characterized by vomiting (often severe), diarrhea, dehydration, dark or bloody feces, and in severe cases, fever and lowered white blood cell counts. Acute CPV-2 enteritis can be seen in dogs of any breed, sex, or age. The disease will progress very rapidly and death can occur as early as two days after the onset of the disease. The presence of gram negative bacteria, parasites, or other viruses can worsen the severity of the disease and slow recovery.

Diagnosis

Not all cases of bloody diarrhea with or without vomiting are caused by Parvovirus and many sick puppies are misdiagnosed as having 'Parvo.' The only way to know if a dog has Parvovirus is through a positive diagnostic test. In addition to the more time consuming and expensive traditional testing of the blood for titers, a newer and simpler test of the fecal matter with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen test (ELISA) are also available through most veterinary clinics. Testing of all suspect cases of Parvo is the only way to correctly diagnose and treat this disease.

Treatment

The treatment of Parvovirus is fairly straightforward and directed at supportive therapy. Replacing fluids lost through vomiting and diarrhea is probably the single most important treatment. Intravenous administration of a balanced electrolyte solution is preferred, but in less severe cases, subcutaneous or oral fluids may be used. Antibiotic therapy is usually given to help control secondary bacterial infections. In cases of severe vomiting, drugs to slow the vomiting may also be used. After the intestinal symptoms begin to subside, a broad spectrum de-worming agent is often used. Restricting the food during periods of vomiting is also necessary. Undertaking the treatment of affected dogs and puppies without professional veterinary care is very difficult. Even with the best available care, the mortality of severely infected animals is high. Without the correct amount of properly balanced intravenous fluids, the chance of recovery in a severely stricken animal is very small.

Immunity and vaccination

If a puppy recovers from CPV-2 infection, it is immune to reinfection for probably at least twenty months and possibly for life. In addition, after recovery, the virus is not shed in the feces. There are many commercially prepared attenuated (modified) live CPV-2 vaccines available. Although some people have expressed concern about the possibility of attenuated live vaccines reverting to a virulent strain after being given and then causing disease, studies have repeatedly shown that this does not occur. Commercially prepared vaccines are safe and do not cause disease.

The primary cause of failure of canine parvovirus vaccines is an interfering level of maternal antibody against the parvovirus.
The primary cause of failure of canine parvovirus vaccines is an interfering level of maternal antibody against the canine parvovirus. Maternal antibodies are the antibodies present in the mother's milk during the first 24 hours after the puppy's birth. The age at which puppies can effectively be immunized is proportional to the titer of the mother and the effectiveness of colostral transfer of maternal antibody within those first 24 hours. High levels of maternal antibodies present in the puppies' bloodstream will block the effectiveness of a vaccine. When the maternal antibodies drop to a low enough level in the puppy, immunization by a commercial vaccine will work. The complicating factor is that there is a period of time from several days to a couple weeks in which the maternal antibodies are too low to provide protection against the disease, but too high to allow the vaccine to work. This period is called the window of susceptibility. This is the time when despite being vaccinated, a puppy can still contract parvovirus. The length and timing of the window of susceptibility is different in every litter.

A study done in 1985 in a cross section of different puppies showed, that the age at which they were able to respond to a vaccine and develop protection covered a wide period of time. At six weeks of age, 25% of the puppies could be immunized. At 9 weeks of age, 40% of the puppies were able to respond to the vaccine. The number increased to 60% by 16 weeks, and by 18 weeks of age, 95% of the puppies could be immunized.

When we examine all of the information about maternal derived antibodies, windows of susceptibility, throw in breed susceptibilities, the possibility of unidentified strains, and the effectiveness of different vaccines, we begin to see why there are so many different vaccination protocols and why some vaccinated animals still develop the disease. Drs. Foster and Smith recommend a protocol that will help protect the widest range of dogs. We realize that with our protocol, we will be vaccinating some dogs that are not capable of responding and we will be revaccinating some dogs that have already responded and developed a high titer. But without doing an individual test on each puppy, it is impossible to determine where the puppy is in its immune status. We also realize due to the window of susceptibility, some litters will contract parvovirus despite being vaccinated. By using quality vaccines and an aggressive vaccination protocol, we can make this window of susceptibility as small as possible.

Conclusion

In summary, parvovirus is a very common problem that is a huge killer of puppies. Due to its ability to be transmitted through hands, clothes, and most likely rodents and insects, it is virtually impossible to have a kennel that will not eventually be exposed to the disease. Modified live vaccines are safe and effective, but despite the best vaccination protocol, all puppies will have a window of susceptibility of at least several days where they will be at risk. Using the newer high titer vaccines may shorten the window of susceptibility on many puppies. Prompt treatment by a veterinarian will increase survivability in infected puppies and working with your veterinarian on a vaccination program that is best for your puppy is important. As new information on this disease and vaccines become available, we will continue to update this article in hopes of keeping you as informed on Parvo

Last edited by OkieHunter; 04-10-2008 at 06:10 PM.
  #6  
Old 04-10-2008, 05:21 PM
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Thank You Okie! I appreciate ALL this information. I'm going to pass the link to this thread along to my friend, so they can check it out and get this taken care of.
  #7  
Old 04-10-2008, 05:29 PM
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No problem glad I could help.
Anything I can do to prevent another puppy from loosing it's life in such a terrible way is time well spent.
  #8  
Old 04-11-2008, 12:37 AM
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Default bleach alternative

http://www.wysiwash.com/

This is a heck of a product for a bleach alternative.

Easy distribution, no mixing.
  #9  
Old 04-11-2008, 09:58 AM
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Just saw this morning where the Madison/Oglethorpe shelter has been quaranteed again after an outbreak. Vicious disease that can kill quickly. I imagine a vet's office can suggest something other than bleach if they want to give them a call.
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Old 04-11-2008, 12:14 PM
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The best preventative is to keep the puppy from being exposed to dogs that have the disease or have been exposed to the disease.

Parvo is pretty much everywhere, and a good healthy pup can usually avoid it if normal sanitation practices are followed.

In our dog group, there is someone having puppies nearly all the time, and nearly all parvo cases (and thankfully they are very few) involve exposure to other dogs, not environmental problems.
  #11  
Old 04-11-2008, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twenty five ought six View Post
The best preventative is to keep the puppy from being exposed to dogs that have the disease or have been exposed to the disease.

Parvo is pretty much everywhere, and a good healthy pup can usually avoid it if normal sanitation practices are followed.

In our dog group, there is someone having puppies nearly all the time, and nearly all parvo cases (and thankfully they are very few) involve exposure to other dogs, not environmental problems.
This puppy was adopted from a shelter, which is where it most likely got it. It hasn't been around any dogs since they adopted it.
  #12  
Old 04-29-2008, 11:55 AM
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UPDATE!!!!
Sasha is 100% better and the Shelter she was got from has been exposed!!!
http://www.myfoxcolorado.com/myfox/p...Y&pageId=3.1.1
  #13  
Old 04-29-2008, 02:06 PM
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There is another virus that has the same symptoms as parvo and is called Cocidious we had a pup that had it and it was awful
  #14  
Old 04-29-2008, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GA Christy View Post
There is another virus that has the same symptoms as parvo and is called Cocidious we had a pup that had it and it was awful
isn't that what leads to feline FIP ?

there are vaccines available -- whether they work or not is still up in the air.
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Old 04-29-2008, 06:23 PM
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Cocidious is probably coccidiosis and not viral but a protozoan bug...

Here is some information on it from the 'net...

Coccidia (Coccidiosis): A Cause of Diarrhea
by: Race Foster, DVM & Marty Smith, DVM

What are coccidia?

Coccidia are small protozoans (one-celled organisms) that multiply in the intestinal tracts of dogs and cats, most commonly in puppies and kittens less than six months of age, in adult animals whose immune system is suppressed, or in animals who are stressed in other ways (e.g.; change in ownership, other disease present).

In dogs and cats, most coccidia are of the genus called Isospora. Isospora canis and I. ohioensis are the species most often encountered in dogs. Regardless of which species is present, we generally refer to the disease as coccidiosis. As a puppy ages, he tends to develop a natural immunity to the effects of coccidia. As an adult, he may carry coccidia in his intestines, and shed the cyst in the feces, but experience no ill effects.

How are coccidia transmitted?

A puppy is not born with the coccidia organisms in his intestine. However, once born, the puppy is frequently exposed to his mother's feces, and if the mother is shedding the infective cysts in her feces, then the young animals will likely ingest them and coccidia will develop within their intestines. Since young puppies, usually those less than six months of age, have no immunity to coccidia, the organisms reproduce in great numbers and parasitize the young animal's intestines. Oftentimes, this has severe effects.

From exposure to the coccidia in feces to the onset of the illness is about 13 days. Most puppies who are ill from coccidia are, therefore, two weeks of age and older. Although most infections are the result of spread from the mother, this is not always the case. Any infected puppy or kitten is contagious to other puppies or kittens. In breeding facilities, shelters, animal hospitals, etc., it is wise to isolate those infected from those that are not.

What are the symptoms of coccidiosis?

The primary sign of an animal suffering with coccidiosis is diarrhea. The diarrhea may be mild to severe depending on the level of infection. Blood and mucous may be present, especially in advanced cases. Severely affected animals may also vomit, lose their appetite, become dehydrated, and in some instances, die from the disease.

Most infected puppies encountered by the authors are in the four to twelve week age group. The possibility of coccidiosis should always be considered when a loose stool or diarrhea is encountered in this age group. A microscopic fecal exam by a veterinarian will detect the cysts confirming a diagnosis.

What are the risks?

Although many cases are mild, it is not uncommon to see severe, bloody diarrhea result in dehydration and even death. This is most common in animals who are ill or infected with other parasites, bacteria, or viruses. Coccidiosis is very contagious, especially among young puppies. Entire kennels may become contaminated, with puppies of many age groups simultaneously affected.

What is the treatment of coccidiosis?

It should be mentioned that stress plays a role in the development of coccidiosis. It is not uncommon for a seemingly healthy puppy to arrive at his new home and develop diarrhea several days later leading to a diagnosis of coccidia. If the puppy has been at the new home for less than thirteen days, then he had coccidia before he arrived. Remember, the incubation period (from exposure to illness) is about thirteen days. If the puppy has been with his new owner several weeks, then the exposure to coccidia most likely occurred after the animal arrived at the new home.

Fortunately, coccidiosis is treatable. Drugs such as sulfadimethoxine (Albon®) and trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (Tribrissen®) have been effective in the treatment and prevention of coccidia. Because these drugs do not kill the organisms, but rather inhibit their reproduction capabilities, elimination of coccidia from the intestine is not rapid. By stopping the ability of the protozoa to reproduce, time is allowed for the puppy's own immunity to develop and remove the organisms.

How is coccidiosis prevented or controlled?

Because coccidia is spread by the feces of carrier animals, it is very important to practice strict sanitation. All fecal material should be removed. Housing needs to be such that food and water cannot become contaminated with feces. Clean water should be provided at all times. Most disinfectants do not work well against coccidia; incineration of the feces, and steam cleaning, immersion in boiling water, or a 10% ammonia solution are the best methods to kill coccidia. Coccidia can withstand freezing.

Cockroaches and flies can mechanically carry coccidia from one place to another. Mice and other animals can ingest the coccidia and when killed and eaten by a dog, for instance, can infect the dog. Therefore, insect and rodent control is very important in preventing coccidiosis.

The coccidia species of dogs and cats do not infect humans.



Quote:
Originally Posted by GA Christy View Post
There is another virus that has the same symptoms as parvo and is called Cocidious we had a pup that had it and it was awful
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2008, 06:31 PM
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No, its not. Feline FIV (what you call FIP) is as follows:
Again, I found this interesting stuff on a simple web search...


What is Feline Immunodeficiency Virus?
Virologists classify feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) as a lentivirus (or "slow virus"). FIV is in the same retrovirus family as feline leukemia virus (FeLV), but the viruses differ in many ways including their shape. FIV is elongated, while FeLV is more circular. The two viruses are also quite different genetically, and the proteins that compose them are dissimilar in size and composition. The specific ways in which they cause disease differ, as well.
How common is the infection?
FIV-infected cats are found worldwide, but the prevalence of infection varies greatly. In the United States, approximately 1.5 to 3 percent of healthy cats are infected with FIV. Rates rise significantly-15 percent or more-in cats that are sick or at high risk of infection. Because biting is the most efficient means of viral transmission, free-roaming, aggressive male cats are the most frequently infected, while cats housed exclusively indoors are much less likely to be infected.
How is FIV spread?
The primary mode of transmission is through bite wounds. Casual, non-aggressive contact does not appear to be an efficient route of spreading FIV; as a result, cats in households with stable social structures where housemates do not fight are at little risk for acquiring FIV infections. On rare occasions infection is transmitted from an infected mother cat to her kittens, usually during passage through the birth canal or when the newborn kittens ingest infected milk. Sexual contact is not a major means of spreading FIV.
What does FIV do to a cat?
Infected cats may appear normal for years. However, infection eventually leads to a state of immune deficiency that hinders the cat's ability to protect itself against other infections. The same bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi that may be found in the everyday environment--where they usually do not affect healthy animals--can cause severe illness in those with weakened immune systems. These secondary infections are responsible for many of the diseases associated with FIV.
What are the signs of disease caused by FIV?
Early in the course of infection, the virus is carried to nearby lymph nodes, where it reproduces in white blood cells known as T-lymphocytes. The virus then spreads to other lymph nodes throughout the body, resulting in a generalized but usually temporary enlargement of the lymph nodes, often accompanied by fever. This stage of infection may pass unnoticed unless the lymph nodes are greatly enlarged.
An infected cat's health may deteriorate progressively or be characterized by recurrent illness interspersed with periods of relative health. Sometimes not appearing for years after infection, signs of immunodeficiency can appear anywhere throughout the body.
Poor coat condition and persistent fever with a loss of appetite are commonly seen.
Inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) and mouth (stomatitis) and chronic or recurrent infections of the skin, urinary bladder, and upper respiratory tract are often present.
Persistent diarrhea can also be a problem, as can a variety of eye conditions.
Slow but progressive weight loss is common, followed by severe wasting late in the disease process.
Various kinds of cancer and blood diseases are much more common in cats infected with FIV, too.
In unspayed female cats, abortion of kittens or other reproductive failures have been noted.
Some infected cats experience seizures, behavior changes, and other neurological disorders.
How is infection diagnosed?
Antibody tests detect the presence of antibody in the blood of infected cats.
Positive results
Because few, if any, cats ever eliminate infection, the presence of antibody indicates that a cat is infected with FIV. This test can be performed by most veterinary diagnostic laboratories and also is available in kit form for use in veterinary clinics. Since false-positive results may occur, veterinarians recommend that positive results be confirmed using a test with a different format.
Infected mother cats transfer FIV antibodies to nursing kittens, so kittens born to infected mothers may receive positive test results for several months after birth. However, few of these kittens actually are or will become infected. To clarify their infection status, kittens younger than six months of age receiving positive results should be retested at 60-day intervals until they are at least six months old.
Negative results
A negative test result indicates that antibodies directed against FIV have not been detected, and, in most cases, this implies that the cat is not infected. Nevertheless, it takes eight to 12 weeks after infection (and sometimes even longer) before detectable levels of antibody appear, so if the test is performed during this interval, inaccurate results might be obtained. Therefore, antibody-negative cats with either an unknown or a known exposure to FIV-infected cats-such as through the bite of an unknown cat-should be retested a minimum of 60 days after their most recent exposure in order to allow adequate time for development of antibodies.
On very rare occasions, cats in the later stages of FIV infection may test negative because their immune systems are so compromised that they no longer produce detectable levels of antibody.
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are designed to detect short segments of a virus's genetic material. While antibody-based tests are ideal screening tests for infection, in certain situations (such as confirming infection in antibody-positive kittens or determining infection of cats vaccinated with antibody-producing FIV vaccines), PCR-based tests, in theory, would be superior. Although PCR testing methods offer promise and are being actively explored, at this time unacceptable numbers of false-positive and false-negative results prevent them from routinely being recommended.
How can I keep my cat from becoming infected?
The only sure way to protect cats is to prevent their exposure to the virus. Cat bites are the major way infection is transmitted, so keeping cats indoors-and away from potentially infected cats that might bite them-markedly reduces their likelihood of contracting FIV infection. For the safety of the resident cats, only infection-free cats should be adopted into a household with uninfected cats.
Vaccines to help protect against FIV infection are now available. However, not all vaccinated cats will be protected by the vaccine, so preventing exposure will remain important, even for vaccinated pets. In addition, vaccination may have an impact on future FIV test results. It is important that you discuss the advantages and disadvantages of vaccination with your veterinarian to help you decide whether FIV vaccines should be administered to your cat.
I just discovered that one of my cats has FIV, yet I have other cats as well. What do I do now?
Unfortunately, many FIV-infected cats are not diagnosed until after they have lived for years with other cats. In such cases, all the other cats in the household should be tested, as well. Ideally, all infected cats should be separated from the noninfected ones to eliminate the potential for FIV transmission. If this is not possible-and if fighting or rough play is not taking place-the risk to the non-infected cats appears to be low.
How should FIV-infected cats be managed?
FIV-infected cats should be confined indoors to prevent spread of FIV infection to other cats in the neighborhood and to reduce their exposure to infectious agents carried by other animals.
FIV-infected cats should be spayed or neutered.
They should be fed nutritionally complete and balanced diets.
Uncooked food, such as raw meat and eggs, and unpasteurized dairy products should not be fed to FIV-infected cats because the risk of food-borne bacterial and parasitic infections is much higher in immunosuppressed cats.
Wellness visits for FIV-infected cats should be scheduled with your veterinarian at least every six months. Although a detailed physical examination of all body systems will be performed, your veterinarian will pay special attention to the health of the gums, eyes, skin, and lymph nodes. Your cat's weight will be measured accurately and recorded, because weight loss is often the first sign of deterioration. A complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, and a urine analysis should be performed annually.
Vigilance and close monitoring of the health and behavior of FIV-infected cats is even more important than it is for uninfected cats. Alert your veterinarian to any changes in your cat's health as soon as possible.
There is no evidence from controlled scientific studies to show that immunomodulator, alternative, or antiviral medications have any positive benefits on the health or longevity of healthy FIV-infected cats. However, some antiviral therapies have been shown to benefit some FIV-infected cats with seizures or stomatitis.
How long can I expect my FIV-infected cat to live?
It is impossible to accurately predict the life expectancy of a cat infected with FIV. With appropriate care and under ideal conditions, many infected cats will remain in apparent good health for many months or years. If your cat has already had one or more severe illnesses as a result of FIV infection, or if persistent fever and weight loss are present, a much shorter survival time can be expected.
My FIV-infected cat died recently after a long illness. How should I clean my home before bringing in a new cat?
Feline immunodeficiency virus will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most environments. However, FIV-infected cats are frequently infected with other infectious agents that may pose some threat to a newcomer. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or replace food and water dishes, bedding, litter pans, and toys. A dilute solution of household bleach (four ounces of bleach in 1 gallon of water) makes an excellent disinfectant. Vacuum carpets and mop floors with an appropriate cleanser. Any new cats or kittens should be properly vaccinated against other infectious agents before entering the household.
Can I become infected with FIV?
Although FIV is a lentivirus similar to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus) and causes a disease in cats similar to AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) in humans, it is a highly species-specific virus that infects only felines.
A number of studies have failed to show any evidence that FIV can infect or cause disease in people.
Why should I have my cat tested?
Early detection will help you maintain the health of your own cat and also allow you to prevent spreading infection to other cats.
Under what circumstances should FIV testing be performed?
If your cat has never been tested.
If your cat is sick, even if it tested free of infection in the past but subsequent exposure can't be ruled out.
When cats are newly adopted, whether or not they will be entering a household with other cats.
If your cat has recently been exposed to an infected cat.
If your cat is exposed to cats that may be infected (for example, if your cat goes outdoors unsupervised or lives with other cats that might be infected). Your veterinarian may suggest testing periodically (yearly) as long as your cat is exposed to potentially infected cats.
If you're considering vaccinating with an FIV vaccine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darcy View Post
isn't that what leads to feline FIP ?

there are vaccines available -- whether they work or not is still up in the air.
__________________
Never, ever give up!! Life has its ups and downs but if we keep our heads up and our faith in GOD strong, we win!
 


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