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Old 09-29-2008, 07:47 AM
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Default Worms in deer meat?

Got lucky enough to put two on the ground Saturday. One doe, one buck. Pulled all the good meat off and got it soaking. When I started processing, I noticed that both backstraps off the young buck had long, thin white worms in the meat. I check the hams and they were fine, but both backstraps got tossed out. Have you guys ever seen this?
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Old 09-29-2008, 07:50 AM
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abdominal worms are long thin white...but couldn't imagine what was in the meat...i wouldn't eat any of it.
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Old 09-29-2008, 07:50 AM
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in the meat or on the meat? They are probably ascerid worms, round worms, that started migrating from the stomachs as the deer cooled. Could just wash them off and it would be ok.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:03 AM
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I don't think I could ever eat that meat after having seen that. I'd look at you with a suspect eye at every covered dish supper.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by SWbowhunter View Post
in the meat or on the meat? They are probably ascerid worms, round worms, that started migrating from the stomachs as the deer cooled. Could just wash them off and it would be ok.
Definitely IN the meat. You could grab one end and pull gently and could pull quite a bit more out of the meat. Pretty unappetizing.

Seems like if they were in the stomach, they would exit through the guts, instead of up through the backstrap.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:25 AM
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My Dad used to tell me to wait until the first frost to start hunting deer because of this. He wouldn't go, even if it wasn't until december, if there wasn't a good hard frost.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWbowhunter View Post
in the meat or on the meat? They are probably ascerid worms, round worms, that started migrating from the stomachs as the deer cooled. Could just wash them off and it would be ok.
Not ascarids....those would be found in the gut. The worms in question here are nematodes commonly called "muscle worms" (Parelaphostrongylus spp.) they are usually found in the loin meat near the spine. They do not affect humans.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:50 AM
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Extra protein???

germag is spot on.

Definitely not appetizing, but not harmful.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:01 AM
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Most were only 3-4 inches long and extremely thin. If you looked closely, you could see segmentation.

Harmless or not, nobody in my family is going to eat wormy meat.

Thanks for the input guys, this is informative.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:06 AM
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I have been hunting a long time and killed a lot of deer but have never seen this. I would not have been able to eaten it either.
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Old 09-29-2008, 12:22 PM
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Mmmm, I'll have mine with extra nematodes please!
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Old 09-29-2008, 12:32 PM
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I tossed a doe over the hill years ago after seeing the same thing!
I had never seen it before and never again, and I have been on the same tract for 25 years.
Chris
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Old 09-29-2008, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merc123 View Post
My Dad used to tell me to wait until the first frost to start hunting deer because of this. He wouldn't go, even if it wasn't until december, if there wasn't a good hard frost.
No offence to your Dad, but a frost wouldnt effect worms inside a deers warm body would it?My Dad wouldnt hunt squrrels till cold weather cause of wolves or bot worm larvae.
BTW Ive never seen this in my 30+ years either, but I wouldnt eat the meat either safe for humans or not.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:41 PM
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A lot of ocean fish like large black drum and large red fish have what we called spiggetti worms in the meat in front of the tail. Looks just like pasta. Not supposed to be harmful to humans, but I never could eat them either.

Have never seen it in deer, but will look much closer.

gt40
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northgeorgiasportsman View Post
Most were only 3-4 inches long and extremely thin. If you looked closely, you could see segmentation.

Harmless or not, nobody in my family is going to eat wormy meat.

Thanks for the input guys, this is informative.
You could have donated the meat to poor people, they need the protein
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GT-40 GUY View Post
A lot of ocean fish like large black drum and large red fish have what we called spiggetti worms in the meat in front of the tail. Looks just like pasta. Not supposed to be harmful to humans, but I never could eat them either.

Have never seen it in deer, but will look much closer.

gt40
I was gonna say the same thing, big Amberjacks are usually notorious for having worms....have any of yall ever seen a fly larvae come out of a deers nasal cavity, every deer we did a necropsy on in school had these larvae in their nasal cavity, they were about the size of your thumb, similar to a wolve but not from a bot fly if I remember right
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:09 PM
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no way guys i would even consider eating one tiny piece of that deer. feed him to the coyotes and opossums.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:16 PM
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They do not affect humans.
OOOOOOH yes they do, this darn thread affected me.. I had no idea deer had those things.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:30 PM
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OOOOOOH yes they do, this darn thread affected me.. I had no idea deer had those things.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:30 PM
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OOOOOOH yes they do, this darn thread affected me.. I had no idea deer had those things.
weenie

After you cook the meat they die. Fish have worms, I guarantee everyone on here has eaten worms in flesh at some point.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:41 PM
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I was gonna say the same thing, big Amberjacks are usually notorious for having worms....have any of yall ever seen a fly larvae come out of a deers nasal cavity, every deer we did a necropsy on in school had these larvae in their nasal cavity, they were about the size of your thumb, similar to a wolve but not from a bot fly if I remember right
Yeah, those are nasal bot fly larvae (Cephenemyia spp.). Ugly as sin, but harmless to humans.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:44 PM
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weenie

After you cook the meat they die. Fish have worms, I guarantee everyone on here has eaten worms in flesh at some point.
Oh, yeah...lots of them.
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Old 09-29-2008, 09:46 PM
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Oh, yeah...lots of them.
DAILY
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Old 09-29-2008, 10:08 PM
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I've killed ducks before that had worms in the breast meat. It looked like little grains of white rice. Supposedly the worms were harmless to people, but I wasn't trying it out.
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Old 09-30-2008, 09:41 AM
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Parelaphostrongylus
a genus in the worm family Protostrongylidae.

Parelaphostrongylus andersoni found in the musculature, especially in the longissimus dorsi, in white-tailed deer.

Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei found in connective tissue around blood vessels and lymphatics of musculature below the vertebral column, abdomen and proximal parts of the limbs in mule and black-tailed deer and in moose.

Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (syn. Pneumostrongylus tenuis, Odocoileostrongylus tenuis, Elaphostrongylus tenuis, Neurofilaria cornelliensis) found in the cranial venous sinuses of white-tailed deer but is nonpathogenic in this species. Infection also occurs in moose, elk, caribou, red deer, black-tailed deer, llama, sheep and goat. In these species the migrating larvae cause serious damage in the spinal cord and posterior paralysis, often in a number of animals at the one time. Called also moose sickness.
Some infected goats also develop a local, linear dermatosis over the shoulders, thorax and flanks, believed to be caused by migrating P. tenuis larvae irritating nerve roots which leads to pruritus and self-trauma along dermatomes.

Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, 3 ed. © 2007 Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved


Parelaphostrongylus andersoni is probably what was in the deer you harvested.

There are no known human health implications. Deer, like other wildlife, are susceptible to a variety of internal parasites as well as bacterial and viral maladies. It should come as no surprise that we have all likely consumed meat with such biological material included. Not too mention, what we have been exposed to in the process of cleaning our deer.

Personally, I would have kept the meat; however, that is a personal decision.

Some more information below:

Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, the meningeal worm, occurs in almost 100% of wild white-tailed deer in eastern North America. For unknown reasons, its distribution excludes the southern portion of the US southeastern coastal states and FL. (Fig.2). The parasite has been reported as far west in Canada as northeastern SK and westward in the US to a line running south-east from the SK-MB border to north-eastern TX. Extension further west is believed to have been prevented by the dry central plains. Once beyond the plains, suitable gastropods and a flourishing white-tail population exist and there is no reason to think that P. tenuis could not become established in western North America, if it were introduced. The west also has valued populations of other native cervids, most of which are susceptible to parelaphostrongylosis.

Fig. 2: Note - Both E. rangifer and P. andersoni occur in NF.
In its normal host, the white-tailed deer, P. tenuis causes no noticeable disease. However, in most other native cervids and in several bovids and camelids, development in the CNS results in conspicuous neurologic signs ranging from lameness, fearlessness, depression and weight loss to severe motor and sensory impairment (paresis, ataxia, stumbling, circling, blindness). All hosts are not equally susceptible to parelaphostrongylosis and severity of the disease is dose dependent. Among native cervids, caribou and mule deer are likely to show the most severe signs, followed by moose and then elk/wapiti. Impact of this parasite on moose and elk populations in eastern N. America has been difficult to quantify. Nonetheless, it is clear that as deer numbers increase, moose decline and this parasite is a contributing factor. Wapiti develop neurologic disease but a few introduced populations persist on deer range in the east. Of great concern are ranched elk that may survive infection and be a source of dsl. However, the greatest risk of spreading P. tenuis westward is presented by white-tails, an increasingly popular species in the game ranching industry.
Parelaphostrongylus andersoni and P. odocoilei are muscle worms and do not enter the CNS of their hosts. Hence, they cause no neurologic disease. Both, however, produce large numbers of eggs that hatch as larvae in the lungs, inducing an intense pneumonia. The impact of P. andersoni infectionwill be greatestin the young animals that can pass large numbers of larvae. Older animals seem to develop a resistance and may eventually overcome the infection. P. odocoilei, however, maintains high larval output in young and old animals. These worms apparently are long-lived.
P. andersoni was first found in white-tailed deer of the southeastern US (where P. tenuis is absent). It's distribution in this host beyond the southeast is spotty (NJ, MI, WY and southeastern BC) but probably is incompletely known. It is much more widespread in woodland and barrenground caribou, having been found in this host from NF to northern AK. P. odocoilei is strictly a western parasite, occurring in mule deer of CA, southern BC and west-central AB. It is also found in black-tailed deer of the Pacific coast from CA into BC, including Vancouver island. This parasite also infects woodland caribou in west-central AB and has been implicated as a possible cause of death in mountain goats. It has recently been discovered in Dall's sheep in the NT by Dr. S. Kutz and colleagues (U. of Sask.).
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