GON Magazine | GON Marketplace

Go Back   Georgia Outdoor News Forum > Birds, Birds and More Birds > Waterfowl Hunting


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-08-2009, 07:13 AM
RBoleman's Avatar
RBoleman RBoleman is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Royston, Georgia
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default attracting ducks

what and when can I plant or do something to draw more ducks to my swamp I have a pretty big swamp but a few woodies and very few mallards just wanting to make it a honey hole and make it legal for hunting
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-08-2009, 08:57 AM
Hoyt's Avatar
Hoyt Hoyt is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Illinois
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

test
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:05 AM
BigDogDaddy's Avatar
BigDogDaddy BigDogDaddy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In the woods
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

does the water have a decent flow to it?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:41 AM
Boudreaux's Avatar
Boudreaux Boudreaux is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Peachtree Corners
iTrader: (10) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Since you'll mostly have Woodducks in a GA Swamp, this is from the Delta Waterfowl website:

Quote:
Wood Ducks eat a broad variety of foods. Their diet, similar to dabbling ducks, consists of seeds, fruits and aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates. Some of their favorites include acorns, smartweed, wild cherry and duck weed. Just before laying eggs and during laying, hens eat insects rich in calcium and protein elements necessary for egg production. Late in the summer, Wood Ducks eat fruits and vegetative plant parts while in the winter months they consume more seeds, which are high in fat for gaining and maintaining weight.

Ducklings eat a wide variety of plant and animal matter like their parents. This way, they are able to ensure they receive all the necessary nutrients to grow and develop. Young ducklings consume mostly invertebrates in their first week of life and add more plant matter as they get older.
Millett is always a good choice for a variety of ducks, as are other various grains - sorgrum, milo, corn, soybeans, wild rice etc. Various ducks feed on aquatic insects, wild rice and sago pondweed in shallow lakes.

If you can drain it and plant it, then let the crops get established an then flood it, it should attract ducks in the area. If you're in a bad area where there are no ducks, you'll probably be just wasting your money.
__________________
Happy, happy, happy.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-08-2009, 06:41 PM
RBoleman's Avatar
RBoleman RBoleman is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Royston, Georgia
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDogDaddy View Post
does the water have a decent flow to it?
yeah it does one of the better creeks in the area
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-08-2009, 06:55 PM
RBoleman's Avatar
RBoleman RBoleman is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Royston, Georgia
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

hey hoyt .... i am trying to cheat on my test just like school
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-08-2009, 08:21 PM
Mark K Mark K is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sylvester, Ga
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Local GW told me if planted for sole purpose of attracting ducks then it may not be hunted over if it's been manipulated with in any way the first year (Baiting). If it reseeds by itself next year then it may be hunted over. Sorta like planting corn for ducks. Perfectly legal as long as it's still on the stalk. The only way for ducks to feed on it is to get the water level high enough for the ducks to be able to get to it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-08-2009, 08:39 PM
injun joe's Avatar
injun joe injun joe is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: mayretta
iTrader: (8) Check/Add Feedback
Default

That's why I'm not asking the GW.
__________________
His foreign policies are Carteresque, his economic policies are Hooveresque, and his administration's ethics are Clintonesque; our leader is now an affirmative action project gone bad.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-08-2009, 11:54 PM
chase870's Avatar
chase870 chase870 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Winder Ga.
iTrader: (5) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Corn whole kernal corn
__________________
KILL THE SLOW ONES
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-09-2009, 12:38 AM
Dpsmith's Avatar
Dpsmith Dpsmith is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eastman(Dodge Co.)
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

what if you plant the corn then knock the stalks down to the ducks level!! or a strong wind comes and knocks them down!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-09-2009, 12:56 AM
91xjgawes's Avatar
91xjgawes 91xjgawes is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Thomson, McDuffie Co.
iTrader: (13) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chase870 View Post
Corn whole kernal corn
x2

10 char
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-09-2009, 09:50 AM
Boudreaux's Avatar
Boudreaux Boudreaux is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Peachtree Corners
iTrader: (10) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark K View Post
Local GW told me if planted for sole purpose of attracting ducks then it may not be hunted over if it's been manipulated with in any way the first year (Baiting). If it reseeds by itself next year then it may be hunted over. Sorta like planting corn for ducks. Perfectly legal as long as it's still on the stalk. The only way for ducks to feed on it is to get the water level high enough for the ducks to be able to get to it.

HMMMMM. DNR plants several areas every year and then floods some of them for the managed waterfowl hunts. Some are left on dry grounds - as in the goose pastures on Clarks Hill lake.

And grain will fall off of the stalk eventually even if it is not manipulated. What they will ticket you for is walking all over the planted area to knock the grain off the stalk. If it falls off on it's own, should not be an issue.
__________________
Happy, happy, happy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-09-2009, 03:22 PM
BigDogDaddy's Avatar
BigDogDaddy BigDogDaddy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In the woods
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RBoleman View Post
yeah it does one of the better creeks in the area
So if you poured out 100lbs of millet on Monday, would every seed be gone by Saturday?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-09-2009, 05:20 PM
RBoleman's Avatar
RBoleman RBoleman is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Royston, Georgia
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDogDaddy View Post
So if you poured out 100lbs of millet on Monday, would every seed be gone by Saturday?
I hope so
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-14-2009, 09:52 AM
waddler's Avatar
waddler waddler is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bogart, GA
iTrader: (0) Check/Add Feedback
Default

I don't know how big the swamp is, but if you have as much as 5-10 acres you can have Mallards around Royston. The beaver ponds along the Hudson and the other small rivers North of Royston have mallards periodically.

If you have this much swamp, the first priority is to control the water level. Get your structure in, dry up the swamp and burn it in the early summer. if it was me, I would plant rice, sorghum and Jap Millet in appropriate sites. Just harrow and sow.

Then put the water back on for a flood to water the seeds in. Take the water back off and let the seeds sprout. In the lower areas where the rice is, put water back on careful not to cover the plants. The rice will grow in mud, without flooding, but the water will control the weeds and let the rice make a better stand.

I wouldn't fool with Woodies unless there are water oaks in the swamp, they will come if they want to.

Don't worry about the planted stuff being legal to shoot over. It is, so long as you just flood it and do not try to manipulate it in any way other than regular activities such as happening to step on some of it when walking thru the area. Do not mow, burn, cut or ride the crops down for the birds to have better access. That is illegal, but shooting over flooded, planted crops that have not been manipulated by anything but nature is perfectly legal.

The number one rule with N GA Mallards, "DO NOT TRY TO BANK THEM." Shoot'em when you got 'em, they can be gone tomorrow.

Good luick.

waddler
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004 Georgia Outdoor News, Inc.Ad Management by RedTyger