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Old 11-09-2009, 11:37 AM
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Default How long do fawns need mother?

I was hunting Saturday afternoon and had a big doe and probably 6 month old fawn come out. They were pretty much attached at the hip. I saw this same couple the day before and intentionally passed on them.

Well, more does ended up joining them and i wanted to take a doe but didnt want to shoot the mother (call me whatever you want for being a softy on this).

With all the does in the plot I unintentionally ended up shooting the mother. The yearling then stuck around all evening and was calling for the mother and I will have to say that it bothered me a bit.

I was hoping it would be fine by itself but I heard a pack of coyotes come in overnight and I am guessing they got the fawn.

How long do fawns usually stay with their mother? Is it mainly for protection? Do any others pass on shots in this situation?
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Old 11-09-2009, 11:53 AM
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Been there dopne that, and usually wind up shooting the little one too. They sure do eat good..tender.
A mature doe will typically run the little one off about this time of year. If she dosen't run the young one off, then a buck will. They will usually come back to their momma, post rut anyway, and may even grow old with her. But to make a long answer short. A fawn is usually self sufficent by this time of the year.
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:04 PM
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Fawns are weanable at 60 to 90 days after birth. This is also when they loose their spots. So basically, at this point in the year, the fawn would be fine. If it didn't make it, well, 75% of fawns don't make it anyways, so the chances were against this one living even if you didn't shoot the mother.
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherBadger View Post
Fawns are weanable at 60 to 90 days after birth. This is also when they loose their spots. So basically, at this point in the year, the fawn would be fine. If it didn't make it, well, 75% of fawns don't make it anyways, so the chances were against this one living even if you didn't shoot the mother.
Badger is half right. But the fawn survival rate is a good deal higher here in the south--no winter kill like y'all have in Yankeeland. A fawn will stay with the momma just because she knows where all the grocery stores are at in the county.
Fawn survival rates (after weaning) here in the south are more like 75%, rather than a 75% mortality rate : given they make it past deer season.
Coyotes may have a larger impact now than in earlier years, but on average, fawns have a much easier time in the south than in the north.
You agree with that Badger ?
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCBUCK View Post
Badger is half right. But the fawn survival rate is a good deal higher here in the south--no winter kill like y'all have in Yankeeland. A fawn will stay with the momma just because she knows where all the grocery stores are at in the county.
Fawn survival rates (after weaning) here in the south are more like 75%, rather than a 75% mortality rate : given they make it past deer season.
Coyotes may have a larger impact now than in earlier years, but on average, fawns have a much easier time in the south than in the north.
You agree with that Badger ?
Oh yea i agree. I probably just inverted the numbers(i didn't look em up on the mortality %, just must have remembered it wrong). But yea, fawns have a much easier time down south.
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