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Old 03-05-2010, 08:09 AM
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Default Trophy radishes-who planted and results?

We planted 5 acres this year. They absolutely exploded with the right soil/fertilizer and ridiculous rainfall we had.
This was our first year planting them so the deer intially were slow to turn onto them. Leaves averaged 12-16in in length, 10 plus leaves per plant and produced a ton of forage. Around late Nov. the deer began to nip at them and towards the end of Dec. - through Feb. they absolutely destoryed them! They have pulled the big roots up and eaten them as well. I am very pleased because they have carried the deer all the way through March and there is still a ton of sign in the plots.
Was curious what experience's everyone else had and was this fall the second planting for anyone? Wanted to know if the deer started hitting them earlier in the season knowing what they were.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droptine06 View Post
We planted 5 acres this year. They absolutely exploded with the right soil/fertilizer and ridiculous rainfall we had.
This was our first year planting them so the deer intially were slow to turn onto them. Leaves averaged 12-16in in length, 10 plus leaves per plant and produced a ton of forage. Around late Nov. the deer began to nip at them and towards the end of Dec. - through Feb. they absolutely destoryed them! They have pulled the big roots up and eaten them as well. I am very pleased because they have carried the deer all the way through March and there is still a ton of sign in the plots.
Was curious what experience's everyone else had and was this fall the second planting for anyone? Wanted to know if the deer started hitting them earlier in the season knowing what they were.
It sounds like you just told my story Now every one in our club will be planting them this year. GREAT STUFF. thanks Don
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:05 PM
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Planted several acres and the deer absolutely hammered them. Then had turkeys pulling up leaves in December and eating them. Anyway, the deer stayed in ours all year, from mid October thru last week when we were up burning, still plenty of sign. We will definitely be planting as much if not more next year.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:58 PM
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Deer did not eat much of mine and the cold weather in Jan. killed them.They sure stink when they die. Don't think I will plant them again.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:21 PM
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Planted them last year, will not plant them again. Deer did not touch them. Food plots looked like a picture but were for the most part useless.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droptine06 View Post
We planted 5 acres this year. They absolutely exploded with the right soil/fertilizer and ridiculous rainfall we had.
This was our first year planting them so the deer intially were slow to turn onto them. Leaves averaged 12-16in in length, 10 plus leaves per plant and produced a ton of forage. Around late Nov. the deer began to nip at them and towards the end of Dec. - through Feb. they absolutely destoryed them! They have pulled the big roots up and eaten them as well. I am very pleased because they have carried the deer all the way through March and there is still a ton of sign in the plots.
Was curious what experience's everyone else had and was this fall the second planting for anyone? Wanted to know if the deer started hitting them earlier in the season knowing what they were.
Same for me, Nov nips, Dec-Feb hammer time. Mixed 10 lbs. with my wheat/oats/rye on 4+ acres. Will plant again.
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:06 PM
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My uncle planted them and the deer slayed them! He had about 5 acres worth!
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:58 PM
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They absolutely Hammered ours. Will Plant more this fall.
Bone
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Old 03-07-2010, 08:47 PM
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Default trophy raddishes

Ditto boys! Deer killing them on my farm! They add a lot of nutrients to the soil when the rot ( I was told by a biologist).
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Old 03-10-2010, 07:12 PM
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Great success with the radishes on my farm. A friend of mine planted them as well and had great success. Look forward to seeing how they work as a soil amendmant. They seem to be starting to rot at my place and I am about to have some of the fields turned to put them in the ground.
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Old 03-11-2010, 07:09 AM
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Looks like majority of everyone had success. We will DEFINATELY be planting them again next fall at our farm. On every plot this time
to.

vsudoc - We've got some rotting occurring to. Is there a problem just leaving the roots that are remaining to decay naturally? We have arrowhead and ladino planted throughout much of these plots and do not want to turn them under.
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Old 03-11-2010, 08:19 AM
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Let nature take it's course.
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Old 03-11-2010, 02:31 PM
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Where can one purchase the Trophy Raddishes? Any reading material links?
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Old 03-11-2010, 03:04 PM
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www.trophyradishes.com
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Last edited by jkoch; 03-11-2010 at 03:17 PM. Reason: update
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Old 03-11-2010, 03:16 PM
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I used Kent Kammermeyer's "Sweet Spot" this year on a small plot. It has trophy radishes in it as well as purple top turnips. The radishes didn't mature until December but when they did it looked like a bulldozer had gone through the plot.

I will definitely plant them again next year.
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:43 PM
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Is anyone having sucess with the TRs planted in shaded areas such as in pines, or better out in the full sunshine?
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Old 03-12-2010, 05:50 AM
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Is anyone having sucess with the TRs planted in shaded areas such as in pines, or better out in the full sunshine?
We planted a 200 yard long strip in one of our cut pine rows, the TR's did well. Got to about 8-10in tall. They deifnately prefer sunny areas, but we did have success in the shade.
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Old 03-13-2010, 11:48 PM
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Love them, love them, love them, and so did our deer. Come December-February they flat wore them out. I will say this though, you need to have a good soil ph for them to thrive. We tried them out in two different plots this year, the plot that was well established- good fertility- had great results with huge tops and 10-14 inch roots, the other plot which was fairly new and around pines, highly acidic, had 4-6 inch tops with 6-8 inch roots and the deer did not tear them up as much. In the good plot the deer were still eating them in late February. We will definately plant them again this year.
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Old 03-14-2010, 09:58 PM
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my bro in law planted them looked like hogs had been in there in december deer absolutely raped them. they do need the right ph to really get hit hard and make sure you rotate the crop every 2 years.
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Old 03-16-2010, 08:17 PM
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We planted them in a couple plots this year as a test, mixed with some cereal grains. They did great, the deer loved them, liked them more than the Dwarf essex rape we normally add to our fall mixes, plan on planting more this fall.


Did any of you guys notice them eating the radishes at all?
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:02 AM
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Quote:
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We planted them in a couple plots this year as a test, mixed with some cereal grains. They did great, the deer loved them, liked them more than the Dwarf essex rape we normally add to our fall mixes, plan on planting more this fall.


Did any of you guys notice them eating the radishes at all?
We did. Most of them were eatin entirely. The ones that remained were pulled up and had several bite marks in em. Like you, they hardly touched our rape til late season. Don't think we'll be plantin rape again(and we have always had them hit it hard in past plantings). Think the TR's is the way to go and they produce 10X the food.
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:51 AM
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We planted them on about 3 acres between two plots and in late december thru february the deer destroyed them. It looked like goats had been grazin.

Seems like I read that you don't want to plant them every year but rotate years.
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Old 03-17-2010, 12:50 PM
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Thanks for all the good feedback. If I get a chance to plant a late season food plot, I definitely want to try TR's.
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Old 03-17-2010, 07:38 PM
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So what are they eatin during most of the season........Seeing they dont touch'm till a good frost hits'm As big as they look, it looks like they would drowned out wheat or rye if you mixed it.
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Old 03-17-2010, 07:42 PM
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So what are they eatin during most of the season........Seeing they dont touch'm till a good frost hits'm As big as they look, it looks like they would drowned out wheat or rye if you mixed it.
I was thinking the same thing. Seems like one would have to be careful to not apply to heavy if there are other plants in the same plot. Or just plant them next to other stuff.
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Old 03-17-2010, 07:47 PM
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The key to a good foodplot that actually does something for the deer.......starts with the dirt. Gotta get the dirt right. Each grain or plant requires a certain amount of nutrient, and each is also different.
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Old 03-18-2010, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
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I was thinking the same thing. Seems like one would have to be careful to not apply to heavy if there are other plants in the same plot. Or just plant them next to other stuff.


Yes you have to be very careful not to overseed with this stuff, it's one of the more aggressive/high output brassicas I've ever planted. Plant it too thick and it will choke out your other seeds and cause disease...... fungus etc.

We planted ours in early september and the deer started eating it right away, not real heavy, but then they destroyed it in the cold months.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:58 PM
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I planted a small area they were wiped out not to the success that my family had with them . mixed mine with durana clover. now have a great clover stand. high protein for the spring and summer
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Old 03-22-2010, 09:50 PM
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The plot grew well but the deer did not eat them in my plot. The actual radishes were huge.
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Old 04-21-2010, 08:10 AM
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OK guys,you got me thinking about planting some trophy radishes,but I have two questions.(1)Are these a spring planting or fall,(2)What kind of protien yield do they have?
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:27 AM
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OK guys,you got me thinking about planting some trophy radishes,but I have two questions.(1)Are these a spring planting or fall,(2)What kind of protien yield do they have?
Fall

Don't know how much protein.
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Old 04-22-2010, 01:52 PM
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OK guys,you got me thinking about planting some trophy radishes,but I have two questions.(1)Are these a spring planting or fall,(2)What kind of protien yield do they have?
Here's details about the protein content:


http://www.trophyradishes.com/benefits.php

Trophy Radishes™ for Deer

* Greens (Brassica family) with over 20% protein in December. Deer love them!
* Deer also eat radish root (23% protein).
* Fast germination & growth inhibits weeds.
* Large deep taproot breaks up compaction & brings up deep minerals to the soil surface for antler growth.
* Radishes winter kill, adding tons of organic matter to the soil.
* 5lb plants acre or mixes with clover & small grains to plant 1 acre.


Net Wt. 5 lbs.
Lot # WSO-8-2
Germ. 90%
Pure Seed 99.82%
Other Crop Seed 0.0%
Inert Matter 0.18%
Weed Seed 0.0%
No noxious weed seeds found.
Test Date 5/09

Statement of Authenticity

I am sure that people will be disappointed by most other Daikon radish varieties. There are many varieties of Daikon radishes. Trophy Radishes™ were developed from a tillage variety with large root and top growth. It is the only Daikon radish that has been planted for deer and proven effective in deer consumption trials in 2008 in GA and NY. Other tillage radishes are untested and unproven for deer, many also have a much smaller root. Most Daikon radish varieties are oilseed radishes genetically altered for seed production with reduced root and top growth. If you plant oilseed Daikons, you will be disappointed by the lack of root growth and size compared to Trophy Radishes™!

There is no substitute on the market equal to Trophy Radishes™ for deer. I don't care what the seed dealers tell you!

Sincerely,
Kent Kammermeyer
Certified Wildlife Biologist
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Old 04-22-2010, 02:17 PM
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FYI, in case you did not know . . . . .


http://www.trophyradishes.com/research.php

Research by Dr. Ray Weil at the University of Maryland shows dry matter production of 5,000 lbs/acre for top growth (shoots and leaves) plus another 2,000 lbs/acre of root dry matter production. This is higher than rape, kale and turnips!
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Old 04-22-2010, 03:57 PM
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From the GON article on Trophy Radishes with good info on rich nutrients good for deer antler growth:


http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=2076

Trophy Radishes Creating New Food-Plot Buzz

These large, Oriental radishes are high in nutrition and benefit the soil.

By Kent Kammermeyer & Tommy Hunter

Originally published in the August 2009 issue of GON

. . . . . . .

Radishes should be planted by late August in the North and early to mid-September in the South. Do not attempt to grow them in the spring as they will rush to bloom and go to seed and results will be disappointing.

Incidentally, they are also good in stir fry or raw with a crispy, crunchy texture and mild sweet flavor. They are great in salads and very nutritious, especially high in calcium, phosphorus and iron. But best of all, deer love ’em.



http://www.cooperseeds.com/pages/deer/fwindividual.html

Trophy Radishes

NEW! NEW! NEW!
Trophy Radishes are here!!!!!

*Greens (Brassica family) with over 20% protein in December. Deer love them!
*Deer also eat radish root (23% protein).
*Fast germination and growth inhibits weeds.
*Large deep taproot brakes up compaction and brings up deep minerals to the soil surface for antler growth.
*Radishes winter kill, adding tons of organic matter to the soil.
*5 Lbs. plants 1/2 acre or mixes with clover and small grains to plant 1 acre.

Planting Guide:
1. Prepare smooth weedless seedbed.
2. Apply fertilizer by soil test or use 300 Lbs./acre of 19-19-19.
3. Broadcast 10 Lbs./acre radish seed alone or 5 Lbs./acre mixed with clover or small grains.
4. Cultipack or drag for good seed/soil contact. Do not cover seed more than 1/2 inch deep.
5. Radishes germinate a few days after rain.

5 Lb. bag. $29.95

AVAILABLE AUGUST 2010
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Old 04-25-2010, 05:12 PM
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Planted an acre and the deer ate them but only after frost. I was needing something for the deer prior to frost and was told the deer would hit them after 3 weeks. This is not what happened with me.

I still have a bag I would be willing to sell if someone wants to try them.
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:03 PM
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Planted an acre and the deer ate them but only after frost. I was needing something for the deer prior to frost and was told the deer would hit them after 3 weeks. This is not what happened with me.

I still have a bag I would be willing to sell if someone wants to try them.
send me a private message. It will be worth your time.
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