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Old 06-23-2011, 01:30 PM
vetman1 vetman1 is offline
 
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Default Soybean Questions

First off, I am not able to plant food plots where I deer hunt because the landowner manages exclusively for timber. With that said I have to rely on feeders to supplement native plants.

I have read several articles where adding soybeans to corn dispensed in spin feeders really improves the quality of the feed.

Can you feed raw soybeans in a spin feeder or do you need to buy roasted soybeans?

Can you buy the soybeans in bulk and store them in 55 gallon drums? How long and how well do the soybeans store?

What is the average price for a 50 lb bag of soybeans or a 55 gallon drum of soybeans?

Thanks
Thomas
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Old 06-23-2011, 01:33 PM
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arrendale8105 arrendale8105 is online now
 
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dont know about feed beans, but planting beans gonna run around $30 per bag (50lbs)
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Old 06-23-2011, 01:50 PM
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I bought Feed soy beans a few yrs back for $8 - 50lb bag.

Be sure they have been dried, no need to buy "roasted" but you don't want green soy beans in a closed container for very long.

They are an outstanding protein source, the deer readily eat them and it keeps just like corn, if its dry.

The feed beans are mostly split very few are whole.
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Old 06-23-2011, 04:31 PM
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It would be far better if you can find heat treated or "roasted" soybeans to feed. Soybeans naturally contain a trypsin inhibitor that is broken down by heat. It inhibits the digestion of the proteins. Feed grade beans will be cheaper than seed beans; but any soybeans will be considerably more now than they were a few years ago due to commodity price increases (biodiesel, alternative energy, etc...) Kept cool & dry they should last the season if you bought bulk, but not as long as corn. You'd get a huge protein boost over just feeding corn though. Have you tried any of the pelleted feeds?
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Old 06-23-2011, 04:39 PM
PWalls PWalls is offline
 
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Dried soybeans will go bad faster on the ground than corn will once it hits the elements. I would introduce the beans slowly with the corn and make sure that you never put out so much that they don't get eaten. We have done it this way with hogs and would assume it works with deer as well.
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:11 PM
wildlifepro wildlifepro is offline
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I do not recommend using any raw beans in a feeder at all .If you plan on using them I would highly recommend using flame roasted soybeans as it removes the trypsin inhibitors and will increase your milk production for your does.We use roasted soybeans in our deer feeds .And just do away with corn,its a waste ,only 7.9 % protein and is high in starch and carbs.Your not doing your deer any good feeding starches and carbs durring spring,summer and fall when they need protein,and balanced nutrients .If your limited to feeding you should use a quality deer total feed that will give you results.Your not gonna get it with corn. And for feeders if at all possible use a gravity feeder or a trough style.Spinners are wastefull and you feed everything else in the woods ,opossums coons,birds,squirrels hogs etc...But yes if you want to have beans go with flame roasted beans.Great taste and good smell.

Last edited by wildlifepro; 06-23-2011 at 09:16 PM. Reason: ,
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Old 06-25-2011, 10:16 PM
vetman1 vetman1 is offline
 
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Default Roasted Soybeans

Where do you have to buy roasted soybeans?

I am not sure how I could feed deer pellets as they would seem to spoil pretty quick when exposed to the elements.

If you switch to trough feeders will you not have just as much trouble with varmits eating the feed as with spin feeders?

I am open for suggestions.

Thanks,
Thomas
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Old 06-25-2011, 11:42 PM
1gr8bldr 1gr8bldr is offline
 
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I have experience with this. In using feeders, the main draw is that corn is there every day. The deer soon learn this. They also learn that if they are gonna have any, then they have to show up at my schedule. The bucks tend to take over, not always, but often. Once they are eating all that you are feeding, introduce approximately 20% bean/ 80% corn. They will eat the corn first and then get all the beans before leaving. Next, introduce a higher percent. I have feed 50% beans with no problems. The best time is before the growing season begins thru horn growing season. It is almost too late at this point. The greatest growths I have ever had was when I feed soybeans. I bought 30 bags one year but noticed that I had no potential bucks worth growing that year so I decided to keep them for the next year. Bugs and worms got in them. What did not have bugs would not germinate for seed nor would the deer eat them. $350 dollars wasted. I prefer this much over pellet form which the best I have seen was like 16% protein. Soybeans are 30+. For the money, you get lots more from the beans
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Old 06-26-2011, 10:21 AM
wildlifepro wildlifepro is offline
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Default RE Roaster Soybeans

Quote:
Originally Posted by vetman1 View Post
Where do you have to buy roasted soybeans?

I am not sure how I could feed deer pellets as they would seem to spoil pretty quick when exposed to the elements.

If you switch to trough feeders will you not have just as much trouble with varmits eating the feed as with spin feeders?

I am open for suggestions.

Thanks,
Thomas
Hey Thomas, Roasted soybeans are very hard to come by here in the southern part of the country.They are a big staple in the upper midwest and fed very regular by dairy farms to their stock for healthier feeds and higher milk output production. The roasted beans will keep for a very good time in a sealed container or drum and helps preserve freshness.They will last alot longer in feeders than you think.As far as a place to buy here in our part of the country it tough. Im fortunate to have a guy that has a roaster that does all our beans for us for our feeds. I can suggest that there are alot of peanut plants in the south east and some of them roast their peanuts. Its worth asking to see if they would roast a ton of beans for you.Its worth a shot!! I know a good coop chain can get roasted soybeans for you as well. It will run you anywhere from 13 to 19 bucks per 50 lb bag depending on the dealer. As for a feeder question,Trough feeders are less wastefull than spinners and a gravity feeder is even better. You can coon proof a trough feeder pretty well for about $12.00 and works really well keeping the ringtails and other climbing critters out.PM me and will be gald to help you out with that. As for feeding corn with a protein its not the way to go as when you feed more carbs and starches they become intake limiters for your protein.( cuts back the available amount of needed protein) Putting in high amounts or corn and small mixes or protein ends up being waste as far as getting good nutrition to your deer. For attraction its good but thats about it and its at least better than straight corn. Any type of pelleted feed or textured feed will go bad if put on the ground or if it contains really high fats or stored in a hot place, or it gets wet a few times and not drained properly etc...If using peleted feed use a gravity or trough style and if its a trough make sure the roof extends about 3 ft at each end and over the sides and is sloped to help keep the rain out. You can even put panels up on each end to keep rain from blowing in that way also. And drill at least 20 1/4 inch holes in the bottom of the trough for allowing water to drain in the event it does get wet. If it does get wet a few times check it to see if its molding and if so clean it out and replace it and clean out the drain holes.And yes there are a couple of good feeds out there you just have to do your home work. We just got lab test back on 9 different companies feeds they call deer feeds.With the grain and minerals markets changing every few weeks since October last year there has been alot of changes to formulas from products from last year and some from the year before.When we reviewed test sheets sent in from a few people on the quality from their feed provider 1 and 2 years ago, We saw big drop in all areas of TDN and energy levels as well as as much as 35% cuts in calcium, phosporus, magnesium, manganese, iron etc.., not to mention hardly any vitamins at all in most of the test.Most of whats out there today is just a dressed up cattle feed with a deer lable on it. Not many that are target or species specific for deer. Just do your home work.If I can help you out with finding a roaster in your area or where you can get roasted beans let me know where your located and I will try to help you out. Thanks and hope this helps out.
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