.410 for turkey?

Would you hunt turkey with a .410?

  • Yes!

    Votes: 16 39.0%
  • No Way!

    Votes: 16 39.0%
  • Never really thought about it?

    Votes: 9 22.0%

  • Total voters
    41
  • Poll closed .
#41
I have too much respect for the bird. 410 poses zero additional challenge when compared to a 20 or 12. If you want to kill closer, call them in closer (or, sigh, put your decoy closer). My issue is why handicap yourself if you wound a bird and need a follow up shot that puts it down. I mean down. I feel a 410 should be outlawed for turkeys simply due to the fact it is flat out not enough gun. Will it kill them? Sure. Can you make that follow up shot on a wounded bird with the same efficiency as a larger bore. No. Are you risking a wounded bird to a greater degree? Absolutely. To me, it is the opposite of sporting.

Are you shootings past 40 yards?
 

GLS

Senior Member
#42
I have too much respect for the bird. 410 poses zero additional challenge when compared to a 20 or 12. If you want to kill closer, call them in closer (or, sigh, put your decoy closer). My issue is why handicap yourself if you wound a bird and need a follow up shot that puts it down. I mean down. I feel a 410 should be outlawed for turkeys simply due to the fact it is flat out not enough gun. Will it kill them? Sure. Can you make that follow up shot on a wounded bird with the same efficiency as a larger bore. No. Are you risking a wounded bird to a greater degree? Absolutely. To me, it is the opposite of sporting.
The same argument about a "second" shot being more efficient and therefore "not the opposite of sporting"can be applied against anyone shooting a 10, 12, 16, 20 or 28 gauge single-shot. While a single-shot can be reloaded quickly, there's no argument that a pump, auto or double can deliver a second shot far quicker than a single-shot. But I don't adhere to that argument anymore than I feel that today's .410 shooting today's TSS load is a suspect gun and load for a turkey shot at ethical ranges. The late author Kenny Morgan killed lots of turkeys, including some with a .410. But to do so, he reportedly often shot a double-triggered .410 SXS with a cork between the front and rear trigger so that when he pulled the front trigger, both barrels fired. He was shooting lead. Today, such is not needed to efficiently and reliably kill a turkey with a .410 at ranges once considered the ethical maximum for a 12 gauge shooting lead. YMMV. Gil
 

Gaswamp

Senior Member
#43
The same argument about a "second" shot being more efficient and therefore "not the opposite of sporting"can be applied against anyone shooting a 10, 12, 16, 20 or 28 gauge single-shot. While a single-shot can be reloaded quickly, there's no argument that a pump, auto or double can deliver a second shot far quicker than a single-shot. But I don't adhere to that argument anymore than I feel that today's .410 shooting today's TSS load is a suspect gun and load for a turkey shot at ethical ranges. The late author Kenny Morgan killed lots of turkeys, including some with a .410. But to do so, he reportedly often shot a double-triggered .410 SXS with a cork between the front and rear trigger so that when he pulled the front trigger, both barrels fired. He was shooting lead. Today, such is not needed to efficiently and reliably kill a turkey with a .410 at ranges once considered the ethical maximum for a 12 gauge shooting lead. YMMV. Gil
First time I wish I had a second shot this year after that ammo failure
 
#45
Been shooting TSS over the last 2 years. Have kilt birds out to 43 yards. Closest was 20. All dead without a flap. Just plain smoked.

I think many who said no in the poll probably haven't experienced the knockdown power of #9 TSS and just can't quite digest the thought of shooting #9's through a small bore at such a big bird. TSS ain't magical, but it hits mighty hard.

I have a fixed choke Mossberg 410 pump with a factory fixed full choke. Bought it with the hope that it'd pattern well using TSS. It didn't, so I've kept hunting with my 20.

Needing to decide whether to send the barrel off to Sumtoy and get tubes (which would probably cost more than the gun did). Other options are to buy a 870 in 410 or load for my 28 gauge O/U.

Will likely end up going the 28 route, but after loading and shooting the Mossberg if I could tweak the pattern just a little I could be pretty comfortable from 30 in with it (and I'm generally pretty conservative about such things).
 
#46
I prefer my 12 any and all day long, but have no objection to 20's because I have used them as well. I just have more confidence in having extra juice and shot. I have witnessed way too many birds get away, even with well placed shots. At any time a hole can open up in any given pattern so why risk it by reducing the load.

Plus, remember that using #9's is/was illegal in some states regardless of energy/velocity. I grew up using 7's, 8's, and 9's for grouse, pheasant, squirrels, crows, rabbits, etc

It's the same argument regarding airguns for deer; a .50 is said to be more than proficient to take down a deer so why use anything else?
 
#47
Back in the day it use to be if you could put 5 lead shot in the bone structure of a turkeys head, and neck that was your Max. kill range. It was printed on the old Winchester turkey targets.
 
Top