About hammock camping...

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I am thinking about getting a hammock for overnight trout fishing expeditions. I am a big boy, say 6-4, 290. An I just dreaming about hammock camping without falling through? If anyone has practical experience or reviews, please let me know.

I searched two years back before posting, and didn’t see any similar threads. Thanks in advance.
 
Good idea to visit the hammock forum. My daughter and me camp in hammocks. She bought her boyfriend at that time a Hexon fabric hammock from Dutchware. This is where we bought our hammocks as well.
He is on the hammock forum and is famous for making all sorts of clips, etc, for the suspension of your hammock.

Hexon 1.6 (now made with Nylon 66) is an incredible hammock fabric that is made exclusively for Dutchware. This fabric is rated for 350 pounds and has one of the best weight rating for this weight of fabric.

I would suggest an 11 foot length especially for your height. Longer hammocks are more comfortable. I like a netless hammock. Meaning one that doesn't have an attached net. You can make or buy a Fronkey type net to hang over your netless hammock ridgeline.

Also make sure to buy one with an attached ridgeline. This is that line over your head that goes from end to end of the hammock. It's main purpose is to keep the hammock at the right angle and pitched tension.
It's secondary purpose it so hang stuff from it such as a bug net, flashlight, and a gear bag. You'll need a gear bag for your cell phone, water bottle, etc.
I can't imagine not having a ridgeline. But to each his own.

https://dutchwaregear.com/product/11ft-netless/#suspension

Polyester straps combined with the Cinch Buckle will have a weight limit of 300lbs. You can talk to Dutch about suspension options. His customer service is the best I've experienced anywhere.

I told him my straps were fraying a bit but it may have been my fault. I wasn't attaching them to the tree at the correct angle. He sent me some new ones anyway. Look at how he talks to folks on the hammock forum. He also has videos of his gear on youtube.

Also check out Shug on youtube. He doesn't sell anythings but test a lot of hammock gear. He is also quite entertaining.

Besides Dutch, there is Warbonnet, Hennessy, and some others.
Email Dutch with your weight concerns. My daughter's old boyfriend probable weighed more than you do.
He can advise you on what fabric and what straps to use.

Perfect for trout fishing streams as you don't have to worry about finding level ground. With 15' straps, you can usually find a spot between two trees just about anywhere.

Next you'll need a rainfly or tarp. We used those Harbor Freight tarps for a few trips. They are OK for car camping. For backpacking you will need something lighter.

We eventually bought the Warbonnet Superfly. It's like pitching your hammock in a A-frame pup tent in winter mode.
We love em. Kind of expensive;

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/p...MI0rTKp4fq3wIVBI7ICh2DdwHtEAAYASAAEgI7i_D_BwE

You could get by with something smaller for summer camping.
 
I have a Warbonnet Blackbird original and love it. Has a shelf for small stuff and an attached bug net. As Kdarsey and Art have said, do your homework. There is a lot to learn and at your size you need to ensure what you get is capable of holding. I tent camped for 10+ years and only hammock camp now. Easier on my back and more comfortable, at least for me. Keep in mind the thermal layer in a hammock on the underside is lacking in comparison to a tent. You can get cold in temps where you might normally be comfortable in a tent. I use a Warbonnet Incubator underquilt. Basically a sleeping bag that hangs below the hammock. Just something else to keep in mind. Good luck.
 
What couple of times I tried it, it about crippled me. Hard on the back. Also cold as the dickens when the weather isn't warm. Give me a tent, a pad and a sleeping bag any day over a bear burrito. Bears love food hanging in a tube on a tree. :)

And I can pitch a tent in much less time than most folks spend screwing around with and adjusting a hammock.
 
I have been hammock camping for a few years now, in fact I went Friday night. I have tried a lot of different hammocks some I liked and some not so much. After that I thought I would diy a hammock and see how it would go. I have been making hammocks now for a little over three years. I had several on the Appalachian Trail this year with hikers attempting a thru hike. I got tired of buying a hammock and then having to buy components just to hang it so with my hammocks I include everything from ridgeline and ridgeline organizer to all straps to hang it that only weighs about a pound and 4 oz for an 11’ hammock. I work a full time job so this is more of a hobby than a side business. I try to provide one of the highest quality and comfortable hammocks you can get. I also use Hexon material which is extremely strong but very light. I could never go back to the ground again it’s just too cold and hard for my bones. If you are interested in one just pm me and I will give you the information on them.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
I am 6’5” and use a Warbonnet Ridge Runner Bridge Hammock. The length is fine but you would need to check the weight limit on the spreader bars. I think it was 250lbs when I purchased 5 years ago. Check out forum member “Just Bill” on hammockforums.net. He makes a nice bridge hammock for larger than average people. If you sleep on your side and you are not familiar with a bridge hammock check them out. They have a spreader bar on each end, and they are like laying on a cot floating in the air.

Once I switched to a hammock I have never looked back. Super versatile, no need to find a flat spot free of roots and rocks. No more puddles in the bottom of your tent when it rains. I have hung mine literally on the side of a mountain to get out of the wind up top. I have slept in mine in temps down to the mid teens comfortably. With a quality top quilt and under quilt you will stay just as warm as any ground dweller, and much more comfortable.
 
What couple of times I tried it, it about crippled me. Hard on the back. Also cold as the dickens when the weather isn't warm. Give me a tent, a pad and a sleeping bag any day over a bear burrito. Bears love food hanging in a tube on a tree. :)

And I can pitch a tent in much less time than most folks spend screwing around with and adjusting a hammock.
Yep we call it the "fiddle factor."

A bear taco is a hammock with out a bug net.

A bear burrito is a hammock with a bug net.

To be fair we call tents bear fortune cookies as the bears never know what they will find inside the tent.
 
I have a Warbonnet Blackbird original and love it. Has a shelf for small stuff and an attached bug net. As Kdarsey and Art have said, do your homework. There is a lot to learn and at your size you need to ensure what you get is capable of holding. I tent camped for 10+ years and only hammock camp now. Easier on my back and more comfortable, at least for me. Keep in mind the thermal layer in a hammock on the underside is lacking in comparison to a tent. You can get cold in temps where you might normally be comfortable in a tent. I use a Warbonnet Incubator underquilt. Basically a sleeping bag that hangs below the hammock. Just something else to keep in mind. Good luck.
Yep, one does need and underquilt. Every time it rains, I like to shine my light from my hammock down on the ground and look at all of that water!
The water that I'm well above. Nice and warm and dry.
 
I am 6’5” and use a Warbonnet Ridge Runner Bridge Hammock. The length is fine but you would need to check the weight limit on the spreader bars. I think it was 250lbs when I purchased 5 years ago. Check out forum member “Just Bill” on hammockforums.net. He makes a nice bridge hammock for larger than average people. If you sleep on your side and you are not familiar with a bridge hammock check them out. They have a spreader bar on each end, and they are like laying on a cot floating in the air.

Once I switched to a hammock I have never looked back. Super versatile, no need to find a flat spot free of roots and rocks. No more puddles in the bottom of your tent when it rains. I have hung mine literally on the side of a mountain to get out of the wind up top. I have slept in mine in temps down to the mid teens comfortably. With a quality top quilt and under quilt you will stay just as warm as any ground dweller, and much more comfortable.
The Double Blackbird is good to 400 lbs.
Heavyweight Double Blackbird:
Weight capacity:
400 Lbs

I originally wanted a bridge hammock when I first started researching. I'm a side sleeper as well. I don't have any problem sleeping on my side in my regular hammock. I also thought I wanted a built-in but net.
I went with a Fronkey style which is good for me as I have to get up in the middle of the night to pee. I tried to use a bottle but too awkward.

I don't always use the net. It's nice to not have it attached to me. My daughter leaves hers on year round. She feels it adds security. I'm not sure from what.
We both love our Superflys.

The Ridgerunner bridge hammock is one of the best. If I got one, that's the one I would get. How does the bridge affect the rainfly? My rainfly is pretty close to my hammock in winter mode.

I think Ridgerunners use the Cloudburst Tarp with this pole mod. below. I'd like to have this mod for my Superfly.
Sometimes I feel my rainfly is too close to my hammock;

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/tarp-pole-mod-kit/
 
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The Double Blackbird is good to 400 lbs.
Heavyweight Double Blackbird:
Weight capacity:
400 Lbs

I originally wanted a bridge hammock when I first started researching. I'm a side sleeper as well. I don't have any problem sleeping on my side in my regular hammock. I also thought I wanted a built-in but net.
I went with a Fronkey style which is good for me as I have to get up in the middle of the night to pee. I tried to use a bottle but too awkward.

I don't always use the net. It's nice to not have it attached to me. My daughter leaves hers on year round. She feels it adds security. I'm not sure from what.
We both love our Superflys.

The Ridgerunner bridge hammock is one of the best. If I got one, that's the one I would get. How does the bridge affect the rainfly? My rainfly is pretty close to my hammock in winter mode.

I think Ridgerunners use the Cloudburst Tarp with this pole mod. below. I'd like to have this mod for my Superfly.
Sometimes I feel my rainfly is too close to my hammock;

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/tarp-pole-mod-kit/
I do use a cloudburst tarp with the pole mod. The only thing I wish it had was the built-in doors like the Superfly, but I purchased the ad on doors. I can pull the tarp down fairly low when it’s windy, but I love to sleep with it in porch mode. Since when sleeping in a bridge hammock one is not as cocooned as a gathered end, I use the built in bug net year-round as it does a great job of keeping the top quilt from falling off during the night. If I was to purchase a gathered end hammock it would definitely be the blackbird. Warbonnet is a great company and everything they offer is high quality.
110FFEC1-9270-4E11-A6AC-A69642A0913F.jpeg
 
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I have a eno double nest can handle up to 400lbs
 
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