Advice To Millennials

Cmp1

Swamp Yankee OABA Recipient
I know that there are plenty of real and really ugly stories about the VA, but the VA is not ALL bad. They treated my FIL for two years when he was in our care (dementia, Type2 diabetes, liver failure, heart disease, hearing loss) and I took him to every clinic visit, and participated in every conversation. I did all the scheduling. Every time, the people at the VA were polite, competent, ready for us, and on time. I did not ever encounter any of the long delays described by others. The facilities I took him to (clinic in St Marys, GA and area clinic in Jacksonville, FL) were clean, well staffed, and had modern equipment.

That is NOT me claiming the VA is good. I know better - I have seen the Dallas, TX VA hospital, and facilities elsewhere. My point is even the worst organizations (like the VA) can get it right occasionally!
They're getting better,,,,especially now with the ability to go outside the VA without prior Auth,,,,still have to qualify though,,,,
 

shdw633

Senior Member
Contrast that with my experience working overseas in an oil rich country where I walked into a hospital with modern technology and US trained doctors and was able to see a specialist the same day. They invite you into their office, sit you down at their desk and take time to hear what's going on and address the problem. Night and day difference in my experience. Not saying socialized medicine is the way to go but whatever we would call our current system in my experience it is far from being the best.
US trained doctors over there, foreign trained doctors over here.
 

shdw633

Senior Member
Not to change the OP's subject which is spot on; but do you ever wonder if the world is getting too tough for the younger generation to deal with? Technology is outpacing most peoples brains and corporations are running on fumes in regards to keeping their personnel down to as few as possible to get the job done. Is the current world becoming too difficult and challenging for our younger generations to the point that when someone stands on a podium and screams I will make it easier for you through socialism they gravitate to it like moths to a light.
 
Is the current world becoming too difficult and challenging for our younger generations to the point that when someone stands on a podium and screams I will make it easier for you through socialism they gravitate to it like moths to a light.
Many of them have been programmed to believe that and they do.
 
Not to change the OP's subject which is spot on; but do you ever wonder if the world is getting too tough for the younger generation to deal with? Technology is outpacing most peoples brains and corporations are running on fumes in regards to keeping their personnel down to as few as possible to get the job done. Is the current world becoming too difficult and challenging for our younger generations to the point that when someone stands on a podium and screams I will make it easier for you through socialism they gravitate to it like moths to a light.
Too difficult and challenging? I don't think so. In many ways we have it far easier than previous generations. The appeal of socialism also isn't unique to this generation. It's found appeal to many generations all over the world.
 
Don’t leave out Medicare/Medicaid( GOV’T) cutting reimbursements to the point that to see ^^ patients means working for free,or at a LOSS😉 Private insurance companies follow suit..while going UP on the consumers premium..AND deductibles😡 Physicians,specialists,and us consumers now get much less,at a higher cost...and more work..
 
Getting us back on tract. Yes, great advice by the OP. The USA is by far the best. Unfortunately, however, the crowd to which you appeal is the very one trying to change this country. The advice is sound, but they need A LOT more than what you offered.
 
Thread starter #31

Patriot44

Senior Member
Best in what sense? My experience has been the US healthcare system is a very expensive train wreck. I saw my ex bounce from doctor to doctor while experiencing chronic pain sometimes waiting weeks to be seen only to be shuffled out the door in tears after being seen for 5 minutes with no help. Doctor collects his insurance money and moves on to the next waiting room. Saw her treated like an addict by pharmacists trying to fill prescriptions for opioids that she desperately needed for her pain and understandably so given the governments involvement in their business. Contrast that with my experience working overseas in an oil rich country where I walked into a hospital with modern technology and US trained doctors and was able to see a specialist the same day. They invite you into their office, sit you down at their desk and take time to hear what's going on and address the problem. Night and day difference in my experience. Not saying socialized medicine is the way to go but whatever we would call our current system in my experience it is far from being the best.
I will try to respond with content instead of a 20 page report on 'state of healthcare', but the reason I believe us to have superior healthcare is because of healthcare on demand, for the most part.

I work in cancer care and am a bit immune to seeing folks with cancer from young ladies with breast cancer to prostate and lung to trigems. During the last 15 months, I have had three people close to me get diagnosed with cancer; one with tonsil who had radiation only, the other with testicular cancer who had surgery and chemo and my father who had bone cancer in his jaw. In all cases, the patients went from diagnosis to treatment (surgery/radiation/chemo) in just a few short weeks. In my fathers case, his surgery was 17 hours long and he was not expected to live, to be honest. His surgery was extremely high risk because he has had a stroke and has a bad heart mostly from smoking and eating biscuits and gravy every day for 70 years. My dad is now receiving his last two weeks of radiation and will be having another series of surgery. Dad's surgery alone was 450K. That doesn't include the next 4 surgery's or radiation.

The fact that a cancer patient, one a 45 year old male in good health and with health insurance, the other a 45 year old male in great health with health insurance and my father on Medicaid and in poor health at 70 years, can go from diagnosis to treatment in weeks is exactly why we have the best healthcare in the world. No other country on earth can do this or is willing to do this. I know that there are anomalies, but what I just said is more the norm than not.
 
I will try to respond with content instead of a 20 page report on 'state of healthcare', but the reason I believe us to have superior healthcare is because of healthcare on demand, for the most part.

I work in cancer care and am a bit immune to seeing folks with cancer from young ladies with breast cancer to prostate and lung to trigems. During the last 15 months, I have had three people close to me get diagnosed with cancer; one with tonsil who had radiation only, the other with testicular cancer who had surgery and chemo and my father who had bone cancer in his jaw. In all cases, the patients went from diagnosis to treatment (surgery/radiation/chemo) in just a few short weeks. In my fathers case, his surgery was 17 hours long and he was not expected to live, to be honest. His surgery was extremely high risk because he has had a stroke and has a bad heart mostly from smoking and eating biscuits and gravy every day for 70 years. My dad is now receiving his last two weeks of radiation and will be having another series of surgery. Dad's surgery alone was 450K. That doesn't include the next 4 surgery's or radiation.

The fact that a cancer patient, one a 45 year old male in good health and with health insurance, the other a 45 year old male in great health with health insurance and my father on Medicaid and in poor health at 70 years, can go from diagnosis to treatment in weeks is exactly why we have the best healthcare in the world. No other country on earth can do this or is willing to do this. I know that there are anomalies, but what I just said is more the norm than not.
I had to fight tooth and nail just to get my insurer to allow a scan when I was diagnosed with an ultrasound. Granted, mine was a weird case because I was diagnosed, as a civilian, in Balad and medevac'd to Landstuhl for the surgery, then released to fly home to undergo complete treatment.

So from my insurance's perspective I went to an oncologist out of the blue and he wanted a PET.

However, once they called him and got his letter stating that it was necessary, with the hormone markers in my blood that should have been the end of any resistance to me getting treatment. Yet, every time I'd show up to my PET appointment they'd tell me that insurance had scrubbed the procedure as not being medically necessary.

3 weeks of phone calls with various reps and managers and I finally had enough and called their VP for customer service and asked him point blank if it was their company policy to let me die before they paid anything out or allowed any testing. He stammered, I explained the whole story, and I was in for the PET the next day and never had another lick of trouble with them.

As I'm sure you know, regarding testicular cancer, oncologists and urologists have a saying to not let the sun set on it once it's diagnosed because of how quick it can metastasize. That 3 week delay allowed it to do so and I had tumors up in my neck and in a lung. The oncologist told me that if it had gotten to my brain my estimated odds of survival would have plummeted.
 
If I could add one thing to Pat44's OP to millennial's it would be:

Everything you do and every decision you make carries a certain amount of risk.
Take the time to study your decisions and, if you can't mitigate the risks, at least understand what the consequences can be.

I told our kids from their early teen years, "Decisions are easy to make, living with them is what can be hard."
 

Cmp1

Swamp Yankee OABA Recipient
Getting us back on tract. Yes, great advice by the OP. The USA is by far the best. Unfortunately, however, the crowd to which you appeal is the very one trying to change this country. The advice is sound, but they need A LOT more than what you offered.
They need to listen,,,,I know it's hard when their young,,,,but,,,,
 
Just remembered, it was gabapentin. That stuff is no joke.

Wow!!! I was taking 1200 mg a day of gabapentin when I had a peripheral nerve tumor, or Schwannoma

It's been removed now and I no longer take them, but I was on it for about 6 months with no side effects other than making me a little drowsy. That's about all it was good for helping me to sleep. 24 hrs a day/7 days a week nerve pain in my left arm.

That was a 10 month nightmare.
 

Keebs

Miss Moderator Ma Hen
Staff member
Just remembered, it was gabapentin. That stuff is no joke.
:hair: I cringe anytime someone says they are taking it.............that IS some bad stuff!!

Good advice on here for the Millennials IF they'll listen!:cheers:
 
:hair: I cringe anytime someone says they are taking it.............that IS some bad stuff!!

Good advice on here for the Millennials IF they'll listen!:cheers:
My advice for them IF they don't want to listen:

Get out on your own now, or as fast as you can, while you still know everything and can make the most use of that knowledge!
 
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