All those in favor of lowering the limit and season...

But what if the one you kill is replaced by 2 neighboring coyotes and 10 more pups the next year? What good have you done?
But what if the one or five you dont kill each have a litter of pups? Its crazy to think we could not improve poult survival by killing/trapping as many as possible.
 
Thread starter #62

Mark K

Senior Member
But what if the one you kill is replaced by 2 neighboring coyotes and 10 more pups the next year? What good have you done?
That’s nothing but opportunity right there.
But let’s say the fairy tale is true, where did they come from? They didn’t appear out of thin air so wherever they left is now getting a break for that prey population to rebound.

I’ll even indulge here and say ok, let’s do nothing about our predators. So my question to you now is, are my coyotes going to say hey we’re great here let’s stay just like we are. No more procreation? Or will they keep having more young that require more food which then demands they move onto neighboring lands to deplete your prey as well?
I’ve heard from many a hunter that has way more time in the woods and knowledge than you or I together, that the turkeys don’t gobble like they used to due to predators. If I can take a few coyotes off each property, add in bobcats and coons, then there isn’t a study out there that I’ll believe that says I’m not making a difference.

YES, other predators will eventually move in. It’s a never ending battle. But in that time frame I may save a clutch of poults or a nest of eggs or even a jake out of a small group. That turkey I shoot next year may not have been here if I do nothing.

I will also agree shooting coyotes every now and then does nothing to the overall population. Doesn’t hurt, but so few are shot regularly that it’s not going to have too much of an effect. But year round trapping sure will. If I take 15 coyotes off a piece of property and only 10 move in, I’ve got a win. I realize I’ll never trap them all, but I can reduce their numbers a little at a time to give other species a chance to thrive.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
That’s nothing but opportunity right there.
But let’s say the fairy tale is true, where did they come from? They didn’t appear out of thin air so wherever they left is now getting a break for that prey population to rebound.

I’ll even indulge here and say ok, let’s do nothing about our predators. So my question to you now is, are my coyotes going to say hey we’re great here let’s stay just like we are. No more procreation? Or will they keep having more young that require more food which then demands they move onto neighboring lands to deplete your prey as well?
I’ve heard from many a hunter that has way more time in the woods and knowledge than you or I together, that the turkeys don’t gobble like they used to due to predators. If I can take a few coyotes off each property, add in bobcats and coons, then there isn’t a study out there that I’ll believe that says I’m not making a difference.

YES, other predators will eventually move in. It’s a never ending battle. But in that time frame I may save a clutch of poults or a nest of eggs or even a jake out of a small group. That turkey I shoot next year may not have been here if I do nothing.

I will also agree shooting coyotes every now and then does nothing to the overall population. Doesn’t hurt, but so few are shot regularly that it’s not going to have too much of an effect. But year round trapping sure will. If I take 15 coyotes off a piece of property and only 10 move in, I’ve got a win. I realize I’ll never trap them all, but I can reduce their numbers a little at a time to give other species a chance to thrive.

Mark, I`m not gonna get in this debate, but I really wish you could see the area where I live and hunt, and what I have observed for the last 26 years. And for the last 10 years since I`ve retired, I`m in the woods nearly every day. It would surprise and amaze you.

My regards :cheers:

Ya`ll carry on....
 
Thread starter #64

Mark K

Senior Member
Mark, I`m not gonna get in this debate, but I really wish you could see the area where I live and hunt, and what I have observed for the last 26 years. And for the last 10 years since I`ve retired, I`m in the woods nearly every day. It would surprise and amaze you.

My regards :cheers:

Ya`ll carry on....
Nic I respect you and your knowledge, but I could say the same about the woods I hunt that have been trapped for years and the areas around that haven’t. I’m sure that habitat plays a major role in what we both see. And maybe they are both places that have always had game.
But as far as I know our predators have no natural enemies. I’m sure predator and prey have survived together for thousands of years, but when you add in man and habitat loss then predators have the upper hand. What preys on the predators? I know coyotes will drive kill fox or drive them out. When I grew up hunting and trapping we would catch just as many fox as coons. For the most part they just aren’t around like they were back then.
 
But what if the one you kill is replaced by 2 neighboring coyotes and 10 more pups the next year? What good have you done?

They wont.

That's not they way it works.

These people (which are anti hunting by the way) are not even saying that. What there saying is when you lower the overall population in an area. The surviving yotes will have larger litters because of the amount of food available. Even if that happens you will only end up with more yotes for a very short term. Then the population would stabilize back to the carrying capacity of the habitat.

For the most part. Where not lowering the population enough in a large area to make this even possible.

One thing id like to know from everyone who does trap and shoot yotes.
Whats the average age of the ones you take?

I know almost all of the ones I call in and shoot are young males.
 
Depends on time of year. Winter I usually have a mix. Spring mama got to eat to feed the pups so she is more active. Summer and fall pups take the forefront of action
 
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