Arrow flight from stand

Thread starter #1
Hey y'all, I'm sure this has already been answered in a previous thread, but should gravity affect my arrow flight from the stand as compared to on the ground(especially at farther distances)? My pins are set from the ground, and I was shooting from my porch at 5yards tall, and my bag was as 20 with the rangefinder. I was hitting dead on with no adjustment to my 20 yard pin.
 
Then what are you worried about. There is a little pralax that exists using pins shooting down. I use a pendulum sight that takes care of it

Is your tree stand 5' tall you would be Wise to shoot from something that approx a mates your stand night
Then you might find about Mr paralx
 
Bend at the waist and problem solved my friend. If you shoot over their back it could be possibly 3 things, two of which you can control. One possibility would be that you just misjudged yardage, #2 (and most likely the case) you brought the bow on target with your arms and DID NOT bend at the waist to bring bow onto target, and #3 would be that the "target" ducked the shot. Hope this helps. Another tip, don't go sky high on your set ups. The shot angle created by this makes the vitals a much smaller target not allowing for wiggle room. My highest set is about 18', find the right tree with another tree right beside it with some limbs/canopy roughly @ 15' along with it being in the shadows. The goal is for concealment and not to get silhouetted. Good luck and stick a big en.
 

BowanaLee

Senior Member
Hey y'all, I'm sure this has already been answered in a previous thread, but should gravity affect my arrow flight from the stand as compared to on the ground(especially at farther distances)? My pins are set from the ground, and I was shooting from my porch at 5yards tall, and my bag was as 20 with the rangefinder. I was hitting dead on with no adjustment to my 20 yard pin.
15' high is probably not high enough to make much difference. Best way to test is get up in your climber and shoot at the distances you'll use hunting.
 

kiltman

Senior Member
you shouldn't have to move your pins at all. If your 20-30 feet in a tree you will want to aim a little low. I hunt at 20-25 feet up, my rangefinder shows my target at 30 yards, but the angle comp says to aim like like its 29 yards. it's about the same a 40 yards.
 
I don't hold low ever. At most heights, there's a one yard difference at most. When I range trees, I range them at the height I'm at, not at their base. The only time I alter my aim spot is on straight down shots. I hold a hair high then.
 
If you estimate the distance from the base of the tree to your target instead of the distance from you to the target it will eliminate the gravity issue. The base of the tree may be 20 yards from the target while the shooter, 15 feet high, may be 22.
 

BowanaLee

Senior Member
I don't hold low ever. At most heights, there's a one yard difference at most. When I range trees, I range them at the height I'm at, not at their base. The only time I alter my aim spot is on straight down shots. I hold a hair high then.
I agree with the first part but I hold low for tree stand shots under 20 yds or I''ll hit high. :huh:
 
You only adjust for the horizontal distance. Line of sight will be greater but gravity only affects the arrow/ bullet over the horizontal distance. Think base of the tree to the deer. I measure out all of my ranges before I climb into the stand so I know from the base of the tree what my angle compensated ranges are. Hope this helps.
 

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You only adjust for the horizontal distance. Line of sight will be greater but gravity only affects the arrow/ bullet over the horizontal distance. Think base of the tree to the deer. I measure out all of my ranges before I climb into the stand so I know from the base of the tree what my angle compensated ranges are. Hope this helps.
This is correct. Don't take our word for it though or the physics behind it. Hang or climb up to your average hunting height and shoot your bow. You will hit high and you can adjust accordingly or just aim a little low if you your equipment well. You should aim low when shooting straight up or up and at an angle as well. The same physics apply in which gravity effects the arrow less than it would when shooting from flat ground. I'm not saying the difference will be drastic, but there will be a difference. As to how much depends on the speed of your bow and how steep of an angle. The steeper the angle, the more low we should aim. So for straight down, gravity has almost zero effect and I aim several inches low. I would aim at edge of the deers body closest to the tree to split the shoulder blades if I shot at a deer straight under me.
 
You only adjust for the horizontal distance. Line of sight will be greater but gravity only affects the arrow/ bullet over the horizontal distance. Think base of the tree to the deer. I measure out all of my ranges before I climb into the stand so I know from the base of the tree what my angle compensated ranges are. Hope this helps.
This isn't true. You should be able to use the same pin regardless of whether you are in the tree or on the ground. Most of the troubles people have comes from people shooting in a different position from the tree than from the ground, which is why they say bend at the waist. Not to get into a bunch of math, but acceleration due to gravity is 32feet/s^2 in the vertical (downward) direction regardless of which direction you are shooting. The time it takes for your arrow to get to the deer determines the drop you get, regardless of where you shoot from. For example purposes, say a bow shoots 300fps, the arrow would travel for .3 seconds and drop 1.4 feet on a 30 yard shot if shot perfectly horizontal on the ground. When you are on the ground, you obviously aim 1.4 feet high on a 30 yard shot if sighted in perfectly. When shooting from a stand, you are still shooting 30 yards in the second example. You still have to account for 1.4 feet of drop due to gravity, because it will take the arrow the same about of time to go the 30 yards between you and the deer, and the 30 yard pin should account for that, just like it does when you are flat on the ground. The arrow is traveling 300 fps along that dotted line in both the first and second drawing. If the arrow theoretically traveled perfect alone the dotted line at 300 fps, whether on the ground or in the tree, it would take the arrow the same amount of time to get to the deer, even though the horizontal distance is different. This means you have got account for the same amount of drop due to gravity, regardless of whether you are shooting from the ground or the stand. The magnitude of the drop due to gravity is a result of time and nothing else. If you use the 20 yard pin from the tree, then you are accounting for "less" drop because the arrow is still traveling 30 yards and still takes .3 seconds to get to the deer. If you use the 20 yard pin, you will be low, just like you would on the ground. The faster the bow shoot though, the less time it takes the arrow to get there, so the less impact you see from gravity, regardless of where you are shooting from.
 
This isn't true. You should be able to use the same pin regardless of whether you are in the tree or on the ground. Most of the troubles people have comes from people shooting in a different position from the tree than from the ground, which is why they say bend at the waist. Not to get into a bunch of math, but acceleration due to gravity is 32feet/s^2 in the vertical (downward) direction regardless of which direction you are shooting. The time it takes for your arrow to get to the deer determines the drop you get, regardless of where you shoot from. For example purposes, say a bow shoots 300fps, the arrow would travel for .3 seconds and drop 1.4 feet on a 30 yard shot if shot perfectly horizontal on the ground. When you are on the ground, you obviously aim 1.4 feet high on a 30 yard shot if sighted in perfectly. When shooting from a stand, you are still shooting 30 yards in the second example. You still have to account for 1.4 feet of drop due to gravity, because it will take the arrow the same about of time to go the 30 yards between you and the deer, and the 30 yard pin should account for that, just like it does when you are flat on the ground. The arrow is traveling 300 fps along that dotted line in both the first and second drawing. If the arrow theoretically traveled perfect alone the dotted line at 300 fps, whether on the ground or in the tree, it would take the arrow the same amount of time to get to the deer, even though the horizontal distance is different. This means you have got account for the same amount of drop due to gravity, regardless of whether you are shooting from the ground or the stand. The magnitude of the drop due to gravity is a result of time and nothing else. If you use the 20 yard pin from the tree, then you are accounting for "less" drop because the arrow is still traveling 30 yards and still takes .3 seconds to get to the deer. If you use the 20 yard pin, you will be low, just like you would on the ground. The faster the bow shoot though, the less time it takes the arrow to get there, so the less impact you see from gravity, regardless of where you are shooting from

But at some point the angle of the force (gravity) is pulling from also has to be taken into account. For instance, if you are 30 yards hight and shoot strait down at a target you would miss with your 30 yard pin. Since gravity would be pullling at the same anglefif your shot, it would not pull it off the mark in any direction. Although, that would probably not come into play ever unless hunting extreme terrain. It would be fun to experiment with though.
 

mark-7mag

Senior Member
This isn't true. You should be able to use the same pin regardless of whether you are in the tree or on the ground. Most of the troubles people have comes from people shooting in a different position from the tree than from the ground, which is why they say bend at the waist. Not to get into a bunch of math, but acceleration due to gravity is 32feet/s^2 in the vertical (downward) direction regardless of which direction you are shooting. The time it takes for your arrow to get to the deer determines the drop you get, regardless of where you shoot from. For example purposes, say a bow shoots 300fps, the arrow would travel for .3 seconds and drop 1.4 feet on a 30 yard shot if shot perfectly horizontal on the ground. When you are on the ground, you obviously aim 1.4 feet high on a 30 yard shot if sighted in perfectly. When shooting from a stand, you are still shooting 30 yards in the second example. You still have to account for 1.4 feet of drop due to gravity, because it will take the arrow the same about of time to go the 30 yards between you and the deer, and the 30 yard pin should account for that, just like it does when you are flat on the ground. The arrow is traveling 300 fps along that dotted line in both the first and second drawing. If the arrow theoretically traveled perfect alone the dotted line at 300 fps, whether on the ground or in the tree, it would take the arrow the same amount of time to get to the deer, even though the horizontal distance is different. This means you have got account for the same amount of drop due to gravity, regardless of whether you are shooting from the ground or the stand. The magnitude of the drop due to gravity is a result of time and nothing else. If you use the 20 yard pin from the tree, then you are accounting for "less" drop because the arrow is still traveling 30 yards and still takes .3 seconds to get to the deer. If you use the 20 yard pin, you will be low, just like you would on the ground. The faster the bow shoot though, the less time it takes the arrow to get there, so the less impact you see from gravity, regardless of where you are shooting from

But at some point the angle of the force (gravity) is pulling from also has to be taken into account. For instance, if you are 30 yards hight and shoot strait down at a target you would miss with your 30 yard pin. Since gravity would be pullling at the same anglefif your shot, it would not pull it off the mark in any direction. Although, that would probably not come into play ever unless hunting extreme terrain. It would be fun to experiment with though.
Do what ?
 

mark-7mag

Senior Member
This isn't true. You should be able to use the same pin regardless of whether you are in the tree or on the ground. Most of the troubles people have comes from people shooting in a different position from the tree than from the ground, which is why they say bend at the waist. Not to get into a bunch of math, but acceleration due to gravity is 32feet/s^2 in the vertical (downward) direction regardless of which direction you are shooting. The time it takes for your arrow to get to the deer determines the drop you get, regardless of where you shoot from. For example purposes, say a bow shoots 300fps, the arrow would travel for .3 seconds and drop 1.4 feet on a 30 yard shot if shot perfectly horizontal on the ground. When you are on the ground, you obviously aim 1.4 feet high on a 30 yard shot if sighted in perfectly. When shooting from a stand, you are still shooting 30 yards in the second example. You still have to account for 1.4 feet of drop due to gravity, because it will take the arrow the same about of time to go the 30 yards between you and the deer, and the 30 yard pin should account for that, just like it does when you are flat on the ground. The arrow is traveling 300 fps along that dotted line in both the first and second drawing. If the arrow theoretically traveled perfect alone the dotted line at 300 fps, whether on the ground or in the tree, it would take the arrow the same amount of time to get to the deer, even though the horizontal distance is different. This means you have got account for the same amount of drop due to gravity, regardless of whether you are shooting from the ground or the stand. The magnitude of the drop due to gravity is a result of time and nothing else. If you use the 20 yard pin from the tree, then you are accounting for "less" drop because the arrow is still traveling 30 yards and still takes .3 seconds to get to the deer. If you use the 20 yard pin, you will be low, just like you would on the ground. The faster the bow shoot though, the less time it takes the arrow to get there, so the less impact you see from gravity, regardless of where you are shooting from

But at some point the angle of the force (gravity) is pulling from also has to be taken into account. For instance, if you are 30 yards hight and shoot strait down at a target you would miss with your 30 yard pin. Since gravity would be pullling at the same anglefif your shot, it would not pull it off the mark in any direction. Although, that would probably not come into play ever unless hunting extreme terrain. It would be fun to experiment with though.
Huh ?
 
But at some point the angle of the force (gravity) is pulling from also has to be taken into account. For instance, if you are 30 yards hight and shoot strait down at a target you would miss with your 30 yard pin. Since gravity would be pullling at the same anglefif your shot, it would not pull it off the mark in any direction. Although, that would probably not come into play ever unless hunting extreme terrain. It would be fun to experiment with though.

If you sight you bow in at 30 yards on the ground, you are actually shooting slightly above horizontal to account for the drop. The slower your bow, the larger this angle will be. If you were for some reason 90 feet in a tree and you used you 30 yard pin, yes you would be shooting the same angle off of vertical that you would be off of horizontal when you were shooting from horizontal, but that has nothing to do with gravity pulling the arrow straight done, it has to do with the fact that you wouldn't be actually shooting straight down with a 30 yard pin. I guess in that situation it is possible for you to miss. However, in the real world, 99.9% of people are 15 - 25 feet in a tree, not 90 feet. In that case it is a 10 yard or less shot straight down, and unless the bow is super, super, slow, a 10 yard pin is essentially horizontal for most people. There won't be a shot where you will have to worry about it.
 
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