Arrow flight from stand


It is simple math. If you are going horizontally at 300 feet per second, you will travel 90 feet horizontally in in .3 seconds. Gravity has no impact on the horizontal speed, only the vertical speed. We could get into the drag and the drag coefficient. However, you all don't understand the basics, so we will assume drag in negligible.
 
Shoot an arrow at 3 feet and then 60 feet through the chrono and tell me how much speed it lost....it's a lot...I've done it. So no...it's not 300fps for 30 yds. Far from it...
 
It is simple math. If you are going horizontally at 300 feet per second, you will travel 90 feet horizontally in in .3 seconds. Gravity has no impact on the horizontal speed, only the vertical speed. We could get into the drag and the drag coefficient. However, you all don't understand the basics, so we will assume drag in negligible.
An arrow traveling at 300fps begins to slow down the instant it leaves the string. It won't be traveling at 300fps once it's traveled 90ft.

But none of this arguing over miniscule numbers matters in the woods. Leave your calculator in the truck and go kill a deer.
 
Great

Thanks. Wonderful thread. I'm sure glad that problem has been answered..............:bounce:
 

Tmpr111

Senior Member
You guys are making this way too complicated. All you have to do is fletch your arrows with a lot of helical, and then you don't have to worry about gravity.

Look, I sketched it all out for you guys....Real world right here!
This looks like the petunia eating City Giant killed earlier this year.
 
An arrow traveling at 300fps begins to slow down the instant it leaves the string. It won't be traveling at 300fps once it's traveled 90ft.

But none of this arguing over miniscule numbers matters in the woods. Leave your calculator in the truck and go kill a deer.
Only due to friction, which I said was negligible. Even if you consider friction in the case of an arrow, it does not slow it down enough to matter. It might go thirty yards in .31 seconds instead of .3. That is still.3
 
Shoot an arrow at 3 feet and then 60 feet through the chrono and tell me how much speed it lost....it's a lot...I've done it. So no...it's not 300fps for 30 yds. Far from it...
The only way it slows down is due to friction, which I already stated, but I am trying to explain the simple stuff here. I'm not arguing that friction slows the arrow down, I know it does. However, if you are shooting from the ground or a tree, the coefficient of drag from the air is the same. The arrow doesn't slow down more due to friction, or drop more due to gravity shooting from a tree stand verses the ground. Therefore it would make no sense to use a 20 yard pin from the tree if you range finder showed 30 yards. It is still thirty yards to the target, regardless of how far it is from the tree, etc..... Like i said from the beginning shoot a fast bow and it doesn't really matter. I've had enough. This has been like trying to explain to the guys in the waterfowl forum why putting a bunch of styrofoam inside of your duck boat makes the boat sit lower and not higher.
 
WAY TO MUCH INFORMATION. A lot of guys pick the wrong pin half the time. Climb a tree with your bow, shoot at the distances you are questioning about, and you will have your answer. Its a question only you can answer correctly. Then add wildlife.
 
WAY TO MUCH INFORMATION. A lot of guys pick the wrong pin half the time. Climb a tree with your bow, shoot at the distances you are questioning about, and you will have your answer. Its a question only you can answer correctly. Then add wildlife.
Bingo! This is exactly the what I tried to explain earlier. I can even pretend to comprehend anything that “across the river” has posted and I do profess to understand the basics. Don’t take anyone’s math or word for anything; shoot from the tree and as a result you will learn your equipment better and know what your arrow will do and how much it will do it. Before quitting, put the target or decoy directly under your stand and try and split the shoulder blades or hit the bullseye and I bet money you had better aim low on this shot. At least I do! I will admit that I haven’t bought a range finder that takes away the angle of the shot and does the math for us. I have a cheap range finder but I do know my bow and i feel confident when I shoot.
 
It is simple math. If you are going horizontally at 300 feet per second, you will travel 90 feet horizontally in in .3 seconds. Gravity has no impact on the horizontal speed, only the vertical speed. We could get into the drag and the drag coefficient. However, you all don't understand the basics, so we will assume drag in negligible.
You’re still wrong. Please google high angle shooting You can do a bunch of “math” but if it doesn’t apply to the actual argument then it’s pointless. Horizontal distance is still going to be shorter than line of sight distance. Line B is always going to be shorter than Line C. Quit doing “math.”
 

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2bbshot

Senior Member
Shoot an arrow at 3 feet and then 60 feet through the chrono and tell me how much speed it lost....it's a lot...I've done it. So no...it's not 300fps for 30 yds. Far from it...
This is a fact. They lose speed quickly it if is going 300 FPS at the bow it's not close to that fast a 90 feet. As Wes later said it is losing speed the second it leaves the string. There is no way around it that's just what happens.
 
You’re still wrong. Please google high angle shooting You can do a bunch of “math” but if it doesn’t apply to the actual argument then it’s pointless. Horizontal distance is still going to be shorter than line of sight distance. Line B is always going to be shorter than Line C. Quit doing “math.”
This is my last response, I promise. I agree with you 100 % that line B is shorter that line C. What that actually means is that gravity is only pulling down on the bullet, arrow, or whatever projectile you are shooting for whatever distance line B is. I agree with that fact 100%. If I am shooting a rifle from the top of a mountain at a deer that is 900 yards from me via the rangefinder, but the deer is only 650 yards from the bottom of the mountain I am on (line B), then you are entirely correct, I would not shoot the rifle for a 900 yards shot. If I did, I would indeed shoot high. In that situation you would be shooting down at an angle of roughly 45%. That would be a .72 factor on your ballistic chart table, meaning you are shooting 72% of your range finder distance. I get it, and I completely agree.
If you look at the "math" I did on the arrow, I assumed your were 15 feet up a tree shooting a C line distance of 90 feet. Again, like I said, the angle in that situation would be about 9 degrees. On your ballistic chart table that would be a correction factor of about .985. So if you want to make an adjustment on your shot you are so determined to make, you would therefore use your 29.5 yard pin instead of you 30 yard pin.

I am not arguing that shooting down hill at a large angle has an impact, I know it does. What I am trying to explain is that you aren't going to be high enough in a tree stand and shooting down far enough for there to be any impact on what pin you use. Even if you are up the tree 25 feet and the rangefinder shows 30 yards, you would be making a "corrected" 29 yard shot. Its the same pin. It still takes the same amount of time to for the arrow to get there. You can't read all this stuff on shooting a rifle down a mountain and try to apply it to shooting a bow out of a 15 foot tree stand. You don't need to "correct" your bow shot, because the factor would be 99% in essentially every situation you would be in anyway. In short, use the same pin you would from the ground. I hope that clears it up. I've read about high angle shooting plenty. I'm just trying to explain to you that it isn't anything to worry about, unless you are going to be shooting a long distance off of a mountain.
 
You can listen to all the advise given but you will not be confident with your tree stand shot until you practice out of a tree stand. Remember to bend at the waist is the best advise.
 

j_seph

Senior Member
I have now printed out archery and rifle ballistic charts and placing one in each stand. Gonna have to work on this so I can figure it out fast enough so the deer does not get gone. May need to place some corn to keep em still long enough to do the calculations. Can you only imagine, you do all the calculations, get your bow/rifle up and the dadgum deer done moved 50 yards. Have to start all over again doing the calcs. I will figure em out and be a math whiz and the deer will not have a chance then!
 

kennethc68

Senior Member
Wow, I thought i was pretty good and putting an arrow in the 12 ring from 20 feet in my climber, but not sure i will be able to do it agian after this thread. LOL
 

BowanaLee

Senior Member
Geez guys, just get an angle compensating range finder. Its a lot quicker than a calculator or math classes. :bounce:
 
I have a rangefinder that allows you to use compensation or not.
In the mountains where I hunt, I can climb 20 feet up a tree and range the base of a tree with compensation. 35 yards. Without -39 yards.
Take that for what it's worth.
 
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