Arrow flight from stand

I have a rangefinder that allows you to use compensation or not.
In the mountains where I hunt, I can climb 20 feet up a tree and range the base of a tree with compensation. 35 yards. Without -39 yards.
Take that for what it's worth.
That’s enough for me to aim low or risk spine shooting or shooting over a deer that may drop down when it hears the bow go off. I’ve killed my fair share of deer with a bow. I used to be that guy that sighted in with fixed pins from the ground and went hunting and shot over many deer and spine shot others. I learned through my own mistakes that i personally need to shoot my bow from a stand and for me the difference is significant enough to either change my sights or know to aim low when I’m in the tree. I’ve done both, but now I know my equipment well and my sights are set at ground level and I aim for the heart on most shots. If it happens to be a 40+ yarder (few and far between for me), I’ll even aim below the heart or let’s say “low heart” and I’ve had better results. I suppose I should buy a range finder that compensates, but I have a low profile redfield rangefinder that I’m fond of and it’s hard for me justify spending $ on an upgrade when I’m confident in what I have.
 
I aimed at the heart on a P&Y buck 2 years ago, misjudged the yardage by only 2 yards, and shot under his leg/belly pocket. I don't hold low any longer. I've shot under a few deer doing that method so I finally quit. I just aim for center lungs/shoulder muscle now.
 
This is fun. So someone tell me if I’m thinking about this correctly as I barely made it through arithmetic classes.

Assume hunting on flat ground in below example:

1) the distance in yards from the base of tree I’m climbing to the target is exactly 25 yards measured with a standard rangefinder.

2) after climbing 20’ high into same tree, using an angle compensation range finder, the finder says shoot as if the target is at exactly 25 yards, EVEN THOUGH the total distance to the target is now something like 28/30/32 yards?

Is that essentially what the angle compensation range finders are telling you to do?
 

BowanaLee

Senior Member
This is fun. So someone tell me if I’m thinking about this correctly as I barely made it through arithmetic classes.

Assume hunting on flat ground in below example:

1) the distance in yards from the base of tree I’m climbing to the target is exactly 25 yards measured with a standard rangefinder.

2) after climbing 20’ high into same tree, using an angle compensation range finder, the finder says shoot as if the target is at exactly 25 yards, EVEN THOUGH the total distance to the target is now something like 28/30/32 yards?

Is that essentially what the angle compensation range finders are telling you to do?
Yes thats correct. But I'll throw something else into the equation. If that deer thinks somethings up and its body language says its about to get the Hades out of town, you better aim low or your going to smack tenderloin. At least using the method above you'll have a starting point to aim low.
 
Holy crap, so I know this is nothing more than just good ol Pythagorean theorem that we learned in middle school. I understand what the Arc rangefinders are doing and I also know that it doesn't matter much sitting at 20ft up unless you're that high and also sitting on a steep hillside, then maybe a little more
but I'm trying to read "across the river's" explanation
Is he saying that we shouldn't use the horizontal distance from the base of the tree
to the target, and use the line of sight because of how fast our bow is and gravity??
 
I'd love to see a hunter with a stand 20 yards up a tree - I'd pay money for that!

You only adjust for the horizontal distance. Line of sight will be greater but gravity only affects the arrow/ bullet over the horizontal distance. Think base of the tree to the deer. I measure out all of my ranges before I climb into the stand so I know from the base of the tree what my angle compensated ranges are. Hope this helps.
 
Top