Arrows?

Thread starter #1
So I have a few huntingdoor wooden arrows and I really like the weight on them. But today the knocks on one failed and for whatever reason I tried out some of my carbon arrows (that I use with my compound bow). The carbon arrows not only seemed to be more accurate, but the accuracy was more consistent over shot sequences, if that makes sense. I typically shoot 3 arrows at a time and I was able to get better, tighter, more consistent groups using the carbon, relative to the wooden arrows.

So, my questions:

1) What weight/spine arrow should I be looking to buy for a 50# samick sage with a 29.5 draw length?
2) is there a good (and decently priced) general purpose carbon arrow that could be used with my recurve for target practice and possible eventually hunting?

I've been looking online about spine, grains per inch, etc and as much as I like math, it just doesn't add up to me. Hoping someone can provide a little guidance so I can start to get the bow and the arrow tuned to my shooting. Thanks in advance!
 

Dennis

Senior Member
Lots of factors to think about and they all matter to some degree. A 50# Sage will be about 53# at your draw length on the average. What weight insert are you using they run from 10 grains to 100 grains each. What weight tip and broadhead are you planning to use? I use the same weight and type of shaft to hunt with and practice/3D with. I use a 400 spine Carbon Express Heritage shafts with a 100 grain brass inserts and a 125 grain head. I would think that would work for you at some undetermined length depending on your strike plate thickness. Start with a full length arrow and trim down 1/4" at a time to get best flight . Or learn to bare shaft to get to what length/head weight combo works best for you
 

oldguy

Senior Member
I just read these posts to my wife. Her reply, "Get your credit card out, add on a room to your house." She's been watching me. I've only been at this 2 years.
When we got married she'd already said that I more hobbies than any man she knew and more "stuff" (hunting, fishing, and trapping). Since then photography, fly fishing for trout and now trad archery - lots more stuff! SO MUCH FUN!!
 
Thread starter #5
I just read these posts to my wife. Her reply, "Get your credit card out, add on a room to your house." She's been watching me. I've only been at this 2 years.
When we got married she'd already said that I more hobbies than any man she knew and more "stuff" (hunting, fishing, and trapping). Since then photography, fly fishing for trout and now trad archery - lots more stuff! SO MUCH FUN!!
Hahahahaha.
Fortunately, my GF is super cool about my hobbies. She's the one that turned me on to flyfishing by getting me a guided trip one year for my bday. Then she built out the "office" into a fly tying room, which is now doubling as a hunting, fishing room.
Stuff and hobbies and learning new things are what men are supposed to be about, IMHO.
 

oldguy

Senior Member
My wife is VERY understanding as well - bought me a fletching jig for Christmas. Now I just need a few dozen feathers, glue, etc., etc...
She asks friends have you seen Steve's flies? That's a whole 'nother story. Luckily I'm not a fly tier!
 

oldguy

Senior Member
Lots of factors to think about and they all matter to some degree. A 50# Sage will be about 53# at your draw length on the average. What weight insert are you using they run from 10 grains to 100 grains each. What weight tip and broadhead are you planning to use? I use the same weight and type of shaft to hunt with and practice/3D with. I use a 400 spine Carbon Express Heritage shafts with a 100 grain brass inserts and a 125 grain head. I would think that would work for you at some undetermined length depending on your strike plate thickness. Start with a full length arrow and trim down 1/4" at a time to get best flight . Or learn to bare shaft to get to what length/head weight combo works best for you
So I have a few huntingdoor wooden arrows and I really like the weight on them. But today the knocks on one failed and for whatever reason I tried out some of my carbon arrows (that I use with my compound bow). The carbon arrows not only seemed to be more accurate, but the accuracy was more consistent over shot sequences, if that makes sense. I typically shoot 3 arrows at a time and I was able to get better, tighter, more consistent groups using the carbon, relative to the wooden arrows.

So, my questions:

1) What weight/spine arrow should I be looking to buy for a 50# samick sage with a 29.5 draw length?
2) is there a good (and decently priced) general purpose carbon arrow that could be used with my recurve for target practice and possible eventually hunting?

I've been looking online about spine, grains per inch, etc and as much as I like math, it just doesn't add up to me. Hoping someone can provide a little guidance so I can start to get the bow and the arrow tuned to my shooting. Thanks in advance!
Hey Splatek,
Here's what you need to do - go to the TRADGANG site and post this same thing.
Spinning off of Strothershwacker's "rocket science 101" there are engineers etc. on there that will stretch it to the 200, 300, and 400 levels plus post Doc levels as well.
Seriously post it and have fun!!
 

dutchman

Senior Member
Personally, I believe you'll be fine with a 500 spine shaft, a standard insert, and a point weight in the neighborhood of 145 grains or so for targets. If you intend to hunt with your rig, you will likely want 400 spine shafts with 100 grain inserts and somebody's broadhead up front.

If you can wait a couple of weeks, we are having a deal at NGTA on March 2 where you can shoot different spine through your rig and see for yourself what flies best. Then you'll know before you spend your dough...
 
I will second Dutchman's post. 500's should be fine, heck even 600's cut to length with a 145 grn head should be good to.
 
Arrows are like trucks....Everyone has their own preference.
Just give me a Chevy or GoldTip anyday
But some very good arrow advise offered up here.
 
Some good info here. As was mentioned Warriors are a good arrow to play around with. Very similar to GT Hunters but are a little cheaper because they are made in mexico. My wife actually killed her first deer in 2017 with a GT Warrior so they will do the job if you need them too. I think Dennis is right though with going with a 400 spine arrow. The Sage has a deep shelf cut which will usually tune with a stiffer arrow. You could possibly get away with a 500 spine if you build your striker plate up a bit. What I do to simplify things is cut my arrows to the same length (30" shaft, 30.5" BOP), so I always have the same sight window, get my spine a little stiff and keep going up up in point weight until I get a good tune.
 
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