Bounties on Coyotes

#2
no kidding, a friend of mine use to live in texas and he said they got 50 dollars for them. cut the ears off and take them to the courthouse and get your money. dont know if its true but it sounded good
 
#3
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GAR

Senior Member
#6
Back in the late 60's and early 70's the Cattleman's Association would give us a $25 bounty on the ears and tail of a coyote.

Then again that was out west.

Tom
 
#7
Bounties don't work.
I disagree, it depends on what the over all goals are. If you are trying to manage a population instead of extinguish one bounties could be effective. I trap a lot, and maybe some of the forum members I trap for will add to this, but you can manage coyote populations. I trap big numbers from hunting clubs every year and many have called to report record deer and turkey kills since removing the coyotes. I wish Georgia would do it. Rob
 

Migraman

Senior Member
#8
Treeman,

Bounties don't work - lots of discussion back and forth on that.

However, my arugument for bounties is that the State may spend $300,000 on a project where they pay some biologist to do a study, take samples and spend two years on the government dime where no coyotes are eradicated but Mr. Professor gets to write a book which the Univeristy of Georgia charges students $100 for - that they have to buy for the class but never actually have to read.. OR sportsmen and country folks can get $25 a head for coyotes and that $300,000 removes 12,000 coyotes from the state, money gets put in to the economy in a place outside of Athens or Atlanta, businesses grow and fewer people need welfare to get by.

Real stimulus in tough times that actually benefits people and wildlife.

BTW, Georgia actually paid some guy at UGA $300K a few years ago to do this so I'm not just making numbers up.
 
#9
Government waste regardless of where it's spent is still waste

My point is that never in the history of bounties for any predator has it worked. The ONLY thing that will reduce the numbers of Coyotes is a reduction in the population of it's prey. Less food = less birth rate. Right now our deer population is very high and can sustain the current population of yotes.

Colorado paid out tons of money over a lot of years for dead yotes. Well now the state is eat up with them. I've hunted all over the country and I've never seen anything close to their numbers
 
#10
SC estimates their deer hunters kill about 30,000 coyotes a year without a bounty http://dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/deer/2010DeerHarvestReport.html . For all practical purposes, most people that have an "opportunity" to kill a coyote already do, you'll just be compensating them for an activity they already perform. The number of additional coyotes killed for a $25 dollar bounty would likely be inconsequential. In addition you'd probably be paying some fox pen owners for coyotes that are killed in their pens.
 
#11
Government waste regardless of where it's spent is still waste

My point is that never in the history of bounties for any predator has it worked. The ONLY thing that will reduce the numbers of Coyotes is a reduction in the population of it's prey. Less food = less birth rate. Right now our deer population is very high and can sustain the current population of yotes.

Colorado paid out tons of money over a lot of years for dead yotes. Well now the state is eat up with them. I've hunted all over the country and I've never seen anything close to their numbers
Colorado has only cage trapping, no footholds, so I hope the coyotes eat everything. If they were serious about reducing coyote numbers they would allow more than cages to catch coyotes. Rob
 
#12
$250,000 on helicopter hunting them plus $50 per coyote. Most of the Coyotes aren't even in Utah, 2/3 of them go back and forth to other states along the border. A lot of those coyotes will be coming from different states. It's a bad idea.
 
#13
I don't know about a state wide bounty, but there are plantations down my way that pay bounties on meso-predators and it sure thins them out. There is no way to eradicate the brush wolves with a bounty, BUT it would sure thin them out where there are any trappers. I only targeted them when people were paying me to. If I was getting 25 or 50 dollars a yote, I would target them all the time, year in, year out and regardless of what folks say, there would be goodly numbers of them taken and it would have an impact on the overall brush/florida/ red wolf-yote cross population on the properties where I would trap.

Bounties have worked in the past, hence the so called red wolf decline, the grey wolf decline and the eastern timber wolf decline.....all due in large part to bounties. I have trapped western yotes and our yotes aint the same animal, they don't behave the same way and they sure are bigger. From what I have read many biologist say our yotes act more like wolves and if that is truely the case, bounties could and would have an impact on them. Sure many brush wolves that would have been killed anyhow would collect money, BUT if it were economically feasable to target them with intense trapping by those that know how; the numbers would be cut back drastically in areas where there are good trappers.

I came up trapping in the 70s when you could make a living trapping due to fur prices, I knew many a person that actually trapped for a living during the winter months. No one does that now because the fur market is down and fuel cost so danged much. At 50 a head though, it would be worth while, especially since you can trap them year round. A good long line trapper focusing solely on brush wolves could make a decent living doing that. If the state allowed off season trapping for brush wolves on public land.....well, I might take up trapping for a living again. You would quadruple the present harvest of brush wolves in the first year.

Like I have said, it wouldn't eradicate them because there is too much private property owned by folks that wouldn't let anyone on the property, let alone trap the property......BUT there are enough clubs and hunting properties that would welcome wolf trappers during off seasons to keep a good trapper knee deep in brush wolves.
 
#14
I disagree, it depends on what the over all goals are. If you are trying to manage a population instead of extinguish one bounties could be effective. I trap a lot, and maybe some of the forum members I trap for will add to this, but you can manage coyote populations. I trap big numbers from hunting clubs every year and many have called to report record deer and turkey kills since removing the coyotes. I wish Georgia would do it. Rob
Aint gunna happen till they "officially" become a problem!:huh:
 

Killdee

Senior Member
#15
Maybe when they drag off enough suburban cats and puppies the Buckhead crowd with some pull could make something happen, not us little people.
 
#16
Old thread but here goes again. Bounties didn't wipe out Wolves, their reputation did. Their perceived threat to humans and livestock along with their habitat change got them.
 
#17
Old thread but here goes again. Bounties didn't wipe out Wolves, their reputation did. Their perceived threat to humans and livestock along with their habitat change got them.
It was the preceived threat to humans and livestock that lead to the bounties. Wolves are coming back strong in areas where they were wiped out by bounties so the habitat change could not be the issue there (Idaho, Montana, wisconson...etc...they all had bounties and government trappers till there were no more wolves there)

Oh yeah, Yellowstone had government trappers which wiped out the wolves....while not a bounty it is not much different.....there was not one iota of habitat change there.
 
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molly

Senior Member
#18
I would like a bounty

I could pay for some of my gas....I`d have to kill two dogs every time I go @ $25.00 a head....I could come out on gas if I killed 20 a month...I could do that....Last year I killed 88 dogs....88 x 25= $2,200..that would really help on the gas...I might even be able to get me a drink..if I didn`t drive too far.
 
#19
I think bounties would work. When it comes to yotes, it should be anything goes...trapping, shooting, and bounties whatever it takes to get the yote population down to a minimum. The money might be a good incentive to get more people off the couch and in the woods killing these fawn killers. PS I want personally thank you molly for killing 88 yotes last year.
 

Killdee

Senior Member
#20
Let me second that, Molly you rock!!!!:cool:You likely saved a few hundred deer if they only killed 1 fawn a year for 3-4 years or for how ever long their normal life span is.:clap::clap::yeah::cheers::fine:
 
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