Caped buffalo with a 45-70

furtaker

Senior Member
My point is, whatever you choose to shoot, do it legally, with respect for the animal, the safety of the trackers, in a sportsman’s manner.

Talk directly with the PH’s you’ll be hunting with, get THEIR opinion on best caliber and shot placement. Ask how you should prepare for your hunt. Fire a lot of rounds, off of sticks, at photographic targets of your game animal. Ask what the terrain is like, the altitude, too. I struggled the first few days of my hunt, thought it was just jet lag. Turns out, altitude adjustment was also an issue. Oh, and get in shape, walk three, four miles twice a day, carrying a ten pound weight(simulates your rifle).

The other issue, if you import your rifle to your hunt country, be sure the suitable and correct ammunition is readily available at your destination. I know of one situation a friend had going to South Africa. His rifle made it to SA, because the claim ticket destination was checked by U.S. Customs. But his personal luggage and ammunition went to Germany or some other European country. He didn’t get it until the last day of his hunt. He was shooting a .375 so getting ammo wasn’t a problem. Check your baggage claim tag to insure the correct destination.

And be careful of advice from those who haven’t “been there, done that”. Everything I’ve written is from my experience hunting with three different professional hunters on three trips.

The last word, hunting in Africa will change a hunter dramatically. Nothing else ever matches up to it. I haven’t fired a rifle since my last trip, we moved back home and I’ve gotten too old now to do the walking. Have a wonderful trip, stay safe, stay downwind and shoot straight!
What caliber do most PHs use to back up their clients on elephant and cape buffalo? I've read that the old 458WM was a popular one if they were carrying a magazine rifle, but I suspect some of them carry the Lott now too.
 
Mine had Lott 458 magazine rifles. I think the vast majority carry some type of .40 caliber. The issue is also about the hazards of elephants and lions in the area. Leopards are unlikely to cause problems unless wounded and there are so few black rhinos around they are a none issue.
 
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Funny thought: I just remembered that I still have 15 rounds of .375 ammo and no rifle that fits.
 
After following African hunting for 10 years now. I have come to the conclusion that you don't have to hunt the big 5 to get the experience.

Hunt Eland in a Dangerous game area. You will do lots of tracking on foot. Just like you would buff or ele. Eland are big animals "2,000 lbs. +" and even a euro mount makes an impressive trophy. Plus Eland stakes are out of this world. In a DG area you will be out in the bush among the big boys. Puts another level of excitement and adventure to the trip.
 
After following African hunting for 10 years now. I have come to the conclusion that you don't have to hunt the big 5 to get the experience.

Hunt Eland in a Dangerous game area. You will do lots of tracking on foot. Just like you would buff or ele. Eland are big animals "2,000 lbs. +" and even a euro mount makes an impressive trophy. Plus Eland stakes are out of this world. In a DG area you will be out in the bush among the big boys. Puts another level of excitement and adventure to the trip.
I totally agree! The number of species, the number of animals, both game and none game, is incredible. The habitat is different, the people are great, d their game animals were wonderful eating.

MY scariest moment was when a young bull elephant charged our truck while we were looking for buff. The PH’s were screaming at him, beating on the side of the truck the rifles were in the back. Whew!

My eland Hunt started after my Cape buff kill. It was by far the hardest hunt I had, taking four days to get a shot. The darn things were always hanging out with herds of zebra and impala and when an eland gets spooked, they don’t stop again for days. A guy in another camp wounded one and they had been tracking it for three days trying to get more rounds in it. They are huge antelope and great eating.

If you want one of the most dangerous hunts in the world, sign up for a tuskless elephant hunt. It costs a good bit less for the trophy fee and you have a much better chance of getting killed. Seriously.
 
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Tuskless!!!
Oh yeah. On both of my DG hunts the PHS weren't scared of Buff, Lion or leopard. They were scared of elephants. Particularly female Elephants.
 
If I was to go on an African hunt, I`d to to kill cape buffalo, sable, roan, waterbuck, bongo, and leopard.
Much the same here, except I'd probably swap the bongo and buff for kudu and gemsbok.
 

660griz

Senior Member
I use to only hunt with bow or handgun. I decided to get a rifle and thought I should get one that would kill anything on the planet. I went with the 45-70. If I were ever lucky enough to hunt a cape buffalo, I would not hesitate to take the 45-70 with some Buffalo bore rounds. I have seen these animals absorb lots of rounds from traditional African big game guns. Often times, when hunting dangerous game, you shoot till they stop moving. And then, put another in them. One shot kills can happen but, you may not want to wait that long. Lots of damage to your underwear, etc., can occur while waiting. :)

That was awhile back. I have several rifles now but, 45-70 is still one of my all time favorites.
Would I hunt cape with the old black powder 45-70? No! Wouldn't hunt one with a bow either. Cause with either, the dead cape is going to have a few modern rounds in him at the end.
 
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