Cherokee Indian Grave Site?

Throwback

Senior Member
#81
I think tomorrow I'm going to get a shovel, a pry bar, a hammer and a pair of pliers and go up the road to the city cemetery and start digging up people and sell whatever I find in the grave on ebay.

Maybe I'll sell the casket for scrap metal, too.


T
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#82
I think tomorrow I'm going to get a shovel, a pry bar, a hammer and a pair of pliers and go up the road to the city cemetery and start digging up people and sell whatever I find in the grave on ebay.

Maybe I'll sell the casket for scrap metal, too.


T
I never undertsood why people think it is OK to dig up indian graves. It's no different than doing the above and gathering up all the gold and silver crowns and selling them.
 
#85
grave markers

do not loose the sight of how many pore folks white and black that have been buried here. the vast majority of farms had a cementary on tthem. there were not many large plantations,just one and two hose farms with houses every hundred yards to half mile or so.
 
#86
Here are some graves I found at a friend's new lease....

No Indian graves but from the 1800....Headstones said some were in the GA Infantry..
Fatboy, Are these graves in Lamar Co? They look like the ones another SCV member and myself marked a few years ago. One Confederate and one War of 1812.
 
#87
I never undertsood why people think it is OK to dig up indian graves. It's no different than doing the above and gathering up all the gold and silver crowns and selling them.
I know where several Native American grave sites are in our lease and my buddy and I find alot of artifacts in the area. People should have some respect for the dead and don't be surprised if the indian spirits come to haunt you:rofl:
 
#88
I know where several Native American grave sites are in our lease and my buddy and I find alot of artifacts in the area. I wouldn't dare touch a grave site though. I know where several undocumented shell mounds are also but those secrets are well kept.

People should have some respect for the dead and don't be surprised if the indian spirits come to haunt you if you dig up their grave:rofl:
 
#89
we had (and I say had) a nice rockpile on some land I help manage in Bartow Cty. I suspected it to not be a burial, but a workshop. There are lots of flakes and debitage around it, as well as preforms and an occasional point. I figure the indians had them a pile of good usable chert and jasper there and some big chunks of limestone to sit on while they worked.

Well someone got into that pile with a backhoe while no one was watching and dug it up. I got in there and poked around and didn't find a thing and I bet a nickel the jerks that dug it up didn't find anything either. (I hope they didn't anyway). I reckon that even if they found some bones, they probably wouldn't have taken them. They couldn't do anything with them anyways.

Wish I knew who did it though.
 
#90
At Big Lazar Creek WMA, there are numerous piles of the same type rocks on several hills at the mouth of the creek where it flows into the Flint at Hickman Island.These piles are in a series of rows, coming together at the top of each hill. These hills are too rocky and steep for any farmer to have even considered planting a crop.If they are graves, there are a lot of dead Indians on those hills.I always wondered if it had some type of ceremony associated with it.
I hunted that WMA several years back and it is covered up
with graves. Some even have markings scratched deep
into the headstone like rock. Maybe there was a battle
or a disease outbreak or something.
One thing is for certain, people have been buried under
rock piles for up to 40,000 years before we sailed over
here. Maybe longer, who knows.
 
#91
My Grandfather was a Creek Injun, he was also a sharecropper on Gene Tallmadge's farm. At some point he told Gene about the mounds between Macon and Perry. Then later Showed them to him. They have since been destroyed (turned into a park/ historical site) I can't say that this was Eugene's fault, But pawpaw never showed him anything else....... but he showed me..... and I have stood on top of a mound in the middle of a South Georgia swamp that was higher than the pines and so covered in pottery shards and points that you could scoop them up by the doubled handful. (but I did not).Those stone plies may be sacred, but are most likely not. I would do some more research and if found to be sacred then most defiantly do not tell anyone or someone will dig em' up and ruin your hunting spot.
 

sgtstinky

Senior Member
#92
I found a suspect rock pile this weekend, it was situated over a small creek which had cut through the bed rock in a very defined manner indicating the age of the creek. The pile was on the west side of the creek and was aligned from west to east. The pile was about 10 feet long and maybe 4 feet wide, it was about 3 feet high. The rocks were predominately quartz, the area was rich in quartz but I believe that the pile was not representative of the natural distribution of quartz, it was over 2/3 rds quartz. The creek side, or east side of the pile had a deep hole, this could be from a long ago tree, or from excavation? If this site was aligned to face east this would be the head stone area of the pile.

I was a vistor to this property so I do not know any of the history, the owner was not present. I passed along my suspicions to the fellow I was with and he will pass it on to the owner. The property was an old farm and the pile could also be from clearing the fields, although it looked to me that someone spent a lot of time collecting quartz.

Any thoughts on this?? The pile was located in Harris county.
 
#93
there is a place out from thomaston close to the flint where along the hillsides are many and I mean many of these gray rocks in 6-7 feet sections like graves as you were mentioning before. it is a couple of hundred feet away from the river.
 
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