Coppicing Hardwoods to Create Natural "Mineral" Stumps

Thread starter #1
So I noticed yesterday someone complaining the forum should be shut-down due to redundant posts.

On that note, here's a share I'm guessing many won't have seen, though admittedly Triple C shared a bit broader reference to it in a post about M.S.U.'s educational podcasts.

VERY interesting research on a way to cut and turn moderate sized hardwoods into NATURAL mineral stumps, with the well-established root systems pushing new growth of MUCH higher mineral content than with regular leaf growth on saplings or hinge-cut trees. Some of the research even points to trees with general lower preference moving to preferred once turned to a coppiced stump.

First a link to an abbreviated 7 minute video highlighting the research...


And here's a link to a longer 45 minute podcast on the subject.

http://extension.msstate.edu/deer-u...episode-007-mineral-stumps-for-deer-nutrition
 
Very cool info in the video. I dont have time to listen to podcast right now, but do you know if he goes into what they are using for the minerals and how they are getting it into the stump?
 
Thread starter #4
...do you know if he goes into what they are using for the minerals and how they are getting it into the stump?
Not using ANYTHING beyond the root system itself... basically with the above ground tree gone, the minerals that would normally be feeding an entire tree instead are concentrated into the new sprouting growth from the stump making the leaf growth far more nutritious than typical leaves would be on say a smaller sapling or the leaves largely out of reach on a tall tree (or hinged cut tree).
 
Not using ANYTHING beyond the root system itself... basically with the above ground tree gone, the minerals that would normally be feeding an entire tree instead are concentrated into the new sprouting growth from the stump making the leaf growth far more nutritious than typical leaves would be on say a smaller sapling or the leaves largely out of reach on a tall tree (or hinged cut tree).
Thanks. Probably be serious regrowth with some 10-10-10 too
 
Thread starter #7
Having listened to the longer podcast and read a few related threads on other forums, can share a few additional highlights...

1) To a degree the bigger the diameter the hardwood cut, the more nutritious the new growth (bigger root system pushing minerals to the new growth). That said, some hardwoods when fully mature don't survive cutting as well as more moderate sized trees. Think the podcast recommended targeting at least 4" diameter trees (but could be off a bit on that too).

2) It sounded as if they tend to do cutting in early summer / around the June time frame as catches tree in good growth cycle with time to push good new growth before fall cool-down.

3) The new growth often gets so hammered that it can continue to serve as a feeding bushy shrub for a few years

4) The nutritional benefits can last a few years

5) Although the general nutrition of the new growth is elevated, it's especially true for several critical growth minerals such as phosphorous

6) Trees picked near bow / hunting sites can make for really good shooting location

7) And not mentioned on the podcast but seen on another forum, might want to be careful NOT to overdo cuttings too close to bedding as could lower need for deer to travel to feed as much
 

Dbender

Senior Member
The little bit you gain isn't worth the risk of introducing disease to any mast producing hardwoods. Why not just try leafblowing small bow areas and monitor deer use? Deer are lazy, you clean/blow under an oak and they are going to utilize that tree/acorns first every time.
 

XJfire75

Senior Member
Love cutting undesirable trees and creating mineral stumps.

Trying to get some pics to upload.
 
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