coyote pictures

Wetzel

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
Finally put my camera on a gut pile this year. Been wanting to do this for several seasons but everytime I'd kill a deer, my cameras were up in the woods so I didn't want to go and get them.

This changed a couple days ago when my son killed his buck. I had a camera at home so we put it on the remains.

On the first night nothing came to it. Buzzards did not mess with it the next day, only a few crows. These photos were from the second night. First photo of coyote was taken at 12:58 and the last photo was taken at 5:18. Remains had been dragged out of sight of camera, coyotes probably were there later.
 

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dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#3
That last pic has coloration like a Carolina or Yellow dog if its tail wasn't so bushy.

Cool pics. If you want to get more pics, stake the carcass so they can't drag it off.
 

Wetzel

Senior Member
Thread starter #4
If you want to get more pics, stake the carcass so they can't drag it off.
Excellent idea.

I knew it would only be a matter of time before they would drag it out of sight of the camera but it never crossed my mind to stake it down. I will certainly do this the next time.
 

olcowman

Hillbilly Philosopher
#7
Awesome pictures and I agree those are some of the healthiest looking coyotes I have ever seen. They really have a bounty this time of year, a gut pile totally vanishes around the house here within 48 hours. I think I will try this with a tied down carcass as someone suggested. Great ideas.
 

olcowman

Hillbilly Philosopher
#8
:shoot::shoot::shoot::shoot::shoot::shoot:Them some good looking coyotes
You reckon we need to shoot them for eating all the gut piles up? LOL Reckon the poor ol' buzzards are a starving to death?:rofl:
 

bfriendly

Senior Member
#9
Pretty Dogs..................its getting cold out so someone needs to make Coats outta them K9s:cool:

AND those are the best pictures I have seen from a Cudde! Very Nice!
 

olcowman

Hillbilly Philosopher
#13
An hour behind? Them poor ol' yotes are going to starve to death before they catch up to her! I wouldn't worry too much about that little doe... this time of year yotes has got them a whole mess of gutpiles to feast and fatten up on. They're justing hanging out nearby where the deer are waiting on that next rifle shot/dinner bell...
 

Meekstro

Senior Member
#14
An hour behind? Them poor ol' yotes are going to starve to death before they catch up to her! I wouldn't worry too much about that little doe... this time of year yotes has got them a whole mess of gutpiles to feast and fatten up on. They're justing hanging out nearby where the deer are waiting on that next rifle shot/dinner bell...
Yeah they don't do much damage.......until fawn season;)
 

Killdee

Senior Member
#15
Great shot!!! I had my deer carcass drug off by a german sheperd sized yote but I did get a few good uns first. My yotes behind my house run in grab stuff and flee, they are ratty looking though.
 

olcowman

Hillbilly Philosopher
#16
Yeah they don't do much damage.......until fawn season;)
How much do you think they are doing? What is your personal experiences and observations? Around meriwether county and the columbus area there seems to be plenty of both deer and coyotes. I have read a couple of research results that suggested that coyotes predation on fawns was was a ridiculously high number. Granted the few I have found like this had some obvious flaws present including the fact that they were very recent, short term studies that took place during the extended severe drought of the last couple of years. Their was also ample evidence of manipulation within a confined area present in one, one was extremely short in duration and covered only one fawning season, and all were either sponsored by or wholly conducted by corporations vested in some way or another in the whitetail hunting industry.

On the other hand there exists hundreds of long termed, independantly conducted (often university related), and much more extensive bodies of research that have taken place all over North America in every sort of environment possible. When I looked at this data and then compared it to the historical records that offered some form of insight into the whitetail/coyote co-habitation and century long yote migrations into the eastern U.S.... when it is all looked at objectively it seems absurd to think that the coyote population here in Ga is going to cause any sort of long term or serious depletion to our state's whitetails. All the inflated fawn predation numbers do not add up nor do they reflect this same scenario in other states?
 

Wetzel

Senior Member
Thread starter #17
How much do you think they are doing? What is your personal experiences and observations? Around meriwether county and the columbus area there seems to be plenty of both deer and coyotes. I have read a couple of research results that suggested that coyotes predation on fawns was was a ridiculously high number. Granted the few I have found like this had some obvious flaws present including the fact that they were very recent, short term studies that took place during the extended severe drought of the last couple of years. Their was also ample evidence of manipulation within a confined area present in one, one was extremely short in duration and covered only one fawning season, and all were either sponsored by or wholly conducted by corporations vested in some way or another in the whitetail hunting industry.

On the other hand there exists hundreds of long termed, independantly conducted (often university related), and much more extensive bodies of research that have taken place all over North America in every sort of environment possible. When I looked at this data and then compared it to the historical records that offered some form of insight into the whitetail/coyote co-habitation and century long yote migrations into the eastern U.S.... when it is all looked at objectively it seems absurd to think that the coyote population here in Ga is going to cause any sort of long term or serious depletion to our state's whitetails. All the inflated fawn predation numbers do not add up nor do they reflect this same scenario in other states?
You might be right. However, I believe coyotes have a very negative impact on the fawn deer population and I will not hesitate to kill every coyote I can.
 
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