cwd tse prion Texas, while rome burns, prepare for the storm

Crakajak

Senior Member
Is there ANYTHING safe to eat?
Seems like most of the vegetable recalls come out of California growers.
Chicken,pork and beef from the national meat producers. Maybe I need to just start growing my own.
 

jbird1

Senior Member
lol.....not well. It's been shipped all over North America by the market. It's going to be pretty tough to regulate it away as well.
 
After researching every bit of literature I can get my hands on the past few days, the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle and not a whole lot is fully understood. I think there is a lot left to shake out going forward. Animals herds have diseases and that goes with eating organic, free range game animals. That's why domestic herds are vaccinated. As others have stated, vaccinating a wild herd of animals is not practical. Mother nature may have to sort this out as I don't hold a lot of hope that humans will be able to.

They discovered CWD in 1969. It’s been 50 years. Not one human has been infected. I am of the opinion that CWD has been here all along. I can remember as a kid in the 80s people shooting strange acting deer and throwing them away. Testing for CWD only ramps up when an adjoining state tests positive. That’s how it “spreads” or that is what the “experts” explain it. To explain the jumps it has had in states they claim that carcasses are spreading it. So a hunter kills a deer in another state, brings it home, cleans it, puts the carcass in a dump pile, and then a deer eats from that dump pile? Or I guess a coyote eats the carcass, poops in a food plot, and the prion survives to inhabit a plant in the food plot. All seems a real stretch to me. These diseases are rare and not killing thousands of deer and therefore have lived barely noticed for hundreds of years. I could be wrong but that’s my take.
 
They discovered CWD in 1969. It’s been 50 years. Not one human has been infected. I am of the opinion that CWD has been here all along. I can remember as a kid in the 80s people shooting strange acting deer and throwing them away. Testing for CWD only ramps up when an adjoining state tests positive. That’s how it “spreads” or that is what the “experts” explain it. To explain the jumps it has had in states they claim that carcasses are spreading it. So a hunter kills a deer in another state, brings it home, cleans it, puts the carcass in a dump pile, and then a deer eats from that dump pile? Or I guess a coyote eats the carcass, poops in a food plot, and the prion survives to inhabit a plant in the food plot. All seems a real stretch to me. These diseases are rare and not killing thousands of deer and therefore have lived barely noticed for hundreds of years. I could be wrong but that’s my take.

Welp, turns out it’s not a prion causing it. It’s a bacteria and the prion is just the after effect. This bacteria can be carried by many live animals and therefore is not being transported by carcasses and not by feeding deer. Here is a video on the research breakthrough from 2-4-19:

 
Thread starter #32
Welp, turns out it’s not a prion causing it. It’s a bacteria and the prion is just the after effect. This bacteria can be carried by many live animals and therefore is not being transported by carcasses and not by feeding deer. Here is a video on the research breakthrough from 2-4-19:

Research claiming that bacteria are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies has never been reproduced despite extremely rigorous attempts to do so.

In blind studies done by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, samples of brain material infected with scrapie, along with uninfected samples, were searched for Spiroplasma spp. and other common bacteria and bacteria-like structures using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification (PCR is a method widely used in molecular biology to make many copies of specific DNA segments). Researchers found no evidence that any eubacterium, including Spiroplasma or any other bacteria type, was consistently associated with scrapie-infected brain tissue, thus concluding that the “agent responsible for TSE disease cannot be a spiroplasma or any other eubacterial species.”

Source:

Absence of Spiroplasma or Other Bacterial 16S rRNA Genes in Brain Tissue of Hamsters with ScrapieIrina Alexeeva, Ellen J. Elliott, Sandra Rollins, Gail E. Gasparich, Jozef Lazar, Robert G. RohwerJournal of Clinical Microbiology Jan 2006, 44 (1) 91-97; DOI: 10.1128/JCM.44.1.91-97.2006

An extensive research project completed at Louisiana State University on the potential roles of Spiroplasmain transmissible spongiform encephalopathies found that following inoculation of Spiroplasma mirum into neonatal goats and five month-old white-tailed deer, none of the animals developed clinical signs or pathology seen in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In this study, the bacteria were introduced to the animals intracerebrally, intravenous, or intradermally. Additionally, researchers conducting this study tested three species of Spiroplasma and found that they were susceptible to minimal dilutions of common laboratory disinfectants as well as heat sterilization of only 250°F for 15 minutes. In a wide array of other studies, samples of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-infected material treated with similar sterilization methods were shown to remain infectious; thus indicating that other factors not related to bacteria result in the transmission and/or persistence of the disease.

Source:

French, Hilari Maree, "Characterization of Spiroplasma mirum and its role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies" (2011).
LSU Doctoral Dissertations. 3012.



Nearly all experimental examination of TSE-causing agents point to proteins at the infectious agent.

The hallmark study of the prions’ role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was conducted by Dr. Stanley Prusiner who demonstrated that after adding enzymes that destroyed DNA and RNA to scrapie-infected brain material, the material remained infections. These enzymes would have damaged or destroyed bacteria present in the samples. However, when he adding protein-neutralizing enzymes to the scrapie-infected brain material, it’s infectivity plummeted. Thus, he demonstrated that the causative agent of the disease was most likely protein based, not bacterial-based. It should be noted that Prusiner’s work earned a Nobel Prize due to its rigor and reproducibility by other researchers.

Source:

Prusiner SB. (1982). Novel proteinaceous infectious particles cause scrapie. Science. 9;216(4542):136-44.



Artificially synthesized prions have shown to be capable of causing prion disease.

To rule out the role of unidentified substances as disease causative agents in samples of infectious tissues, researchers successfully created a “clean” synthetic version of the scrapie prion that was capable of infecting mice.

Source:

Legname G, Baskakov IV, Nguyen HB, et al. (2004). Synthetic Mammalian Prions. Science. 7;305:673-676.

https://nationaldeeralliance.com/ed...pVVqaJgxxvfTCrOtbANA8iZQcom6jmnHRyEf5hAeL840I
 
Your newest source is 2011. The newest breakthrough was in last half of 2018 and announced to the world on Feb 4, 2019.

Research claiming that bacteria are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies has never been reproduced despite extremely rigorous attempts to do so.

In blind studies done by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, samples of brain material infected with scrapie, along with uninfected samples, were searched for Spiroplasma spp. and other common bacteria and bacteria-like structures using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification (PCR is a method widely used in molecular biology to make many copies of specific DNA segments). Researchers found no evidence that any eubacterium, including Spiroplasma or any other bacteria type, was consistently associated with scrapie-infected brain tissue, thus concluding that the “agent responsible for TSE disease cannot be a spiroplasma or any other eubacterial species.”

Source:

Absence of Spiroplasma or Other Bacterial 16S rRNA Genes in Brain Tissue of Hamsters with ScrapieIrina Alexeeva, Ellen J. Elliott, Sandra Rollins, Gail E. Gasparich, Jozef Lazar, Robert G. RohwerJournal of Clinical Microbiology Jan 2006, 44 (1) 91-97; DOI: 10.1128/JCM.44.1.91-97.2006

An extensive research project completed at Louisiana State University on the potential roles of Spiroplasmain transmissible spongiform encephalopathies found that following inoculation of Spiroplasma mirum into neonatal goats and five month-old white-tailed deer, none of the animals developed clinical signs or pathology seen in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In this study, the bacteria were introduced to the animals intracerebrally, intravenous, or intradermally. Additionally, researchers conducting this study tested three species of Spiroplasma and found that they were susceptible to minimal dilutions of common laboratory disinfectants as well as heat sterilization of only 250°F for 15 minutes. In a wide array of other studies, samples of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-infected material treated with similar sterilization methods were shown to remain infectious; thus indicating that other factors not related to bacteria result in the transmission and/or persistence of the disease.

Source:

French, Hilari Maree, "Characterization of Spiroplasma mirum and its role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies" (2011).
LSU Doctoral Dissertations. 3012.



Nearly all experimental examination of TSE-causing agents point to proteins at the infectious agent.

The hallmark study of the prions’ role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was conducted by Dr. Stanley Prusiner who demonstrated that after adding enzymes that destroyed DNA and RNA to scrapie-infected brain material, the material remained infections. These enzymes would have damaged or destroyed bacteria present in the samples. However, when he adding protein-neutralizing enzymes to the scrapie-infected brain material, it’s infectivity plummeted. Thus, he demonstrated that the causative agent of the disease was most likely protein based, not bacterial-based. It should be noted that Prusiner’s work earned a Nobel Prize due to its rigor and reproducibility by other researchers.

Source:

Prusiner SB. (1982). Novel proteinaceous infectious particles cause scrapie. Science. 9;216(4542):136-44.



Artificially synthesized prions have shown to be capable of causing prion disease.

To rule out the role of unidentified substances as disease causative agents in samples of infectious tissues, researchers successfully created a “clean” synthetic version of the scrapie prion that was capable of infecting mice.

Source:

Legname G, Baskakov IV, Nguyen HB, et al. (2004). Synthetic Mammalian Prions. Science. 7;305:673-676.

https://nationaldeeralliance.com/ed...pVVqaJgxxvfTCrOtbANA8iZQcom6jmnHRyEf5hAeL840I
 
Thread starter #36
So, have we determined it's caused by hunting over corn or not?
two things.

1. sometimes feed mills use corn to clean out their mixers and such, where ruminant mammalian protein was manufactured. this is a NO NO...and this was before anyone knew that cwd would transmit to pigs by oral route...now we know this, and the mad cow feed ban should be changed immediately, or were all just peeing in the wind imo...

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

April 9, 2001 WARNING LETTER

01-PHI-12 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Brian J. Raymond, Owner Sandy Lake Mills 26 Mill Street P.O. Box 117 Sandy Lake, PA 16145 PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT

Tel: 215-597-4390

Dear Mr. Raymond:

Food and Drug Administration Investigator Gregory E. Beichner conducted an inspection of your animal feed manufacturing operation, located in Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, on March 23, 2001, and determined that your firm manufactures animal feeds including feeds containing prohibited materials. The inspection found significant deviations from the requirements set forth in Title 21, code of Federal Regulations, part 589.2000 - Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to prevent the establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) . Such deviations cause products being manufactured at this facility to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(f), of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act).

Our investigation found failure to label your swine feed with the required cautionary statement "Do Not Feed to cattle or other Ruminants" The FDA suggests that the statement be distinguished by different type-size or color or other means of highlighting the statement so that it is easily noticed by a purchaser.

In addition, we note that you are using approximately 140 pounds of cracked corn to flush your mixer used in the manufacture of animal feeds containing prohibited material. This flushed material is fed to wild game including deer, a ruminant animal. Feed material which may potentially contain prohibited material should not be fed to ruminant animals which may become part of the food chain.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deviations from the regulations. As a manufacturer of materials intended for animal feed use, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation and the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with the law. We have enclosed a copy of FDA's Small Entity Compliance Guide to assist you with complying with the regulation... blah, blah, blah...

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g1115d.pdf

2nd anything, including corn, feed, food plots, salt licks, mineral licks, that bring large numbers of cervid together in one spot, where they will be congregated into one area feeding, crapping, peeing, drooling, etc, is a petri dish for the cwd tse prion.

look, folks are either all in, or all out, you are dealing with something there that is like the plague.

Norway just banned hay, straw, and i imagine grains will be next, from countries with cwd tse prion...see;

***> NORWAY CWD UPDATE December 2018 Report from the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment (VKM) 2018: 16

Factors that can contribute to spread of CWD – an update on the situation in Nordfjella, Norway

Opinion of Panel on biological hazards of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment 13.12.2018 ISBN: 978-82-8259-316-8 ISSN: 2535-4019 Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment (VKM) Po 222 Skøyen 0213 Oslo Norway FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2018 Norway, Nordfjella VKM 2018 16

Factors that can contribute to spread of CWD TSE Prion UPDATE December 14, 2018

https://vkm.no/download/18.696229a71677d983532c0c11/1544792739325/CWD factors for spread 2018.pdf

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/12/norway-nordfjella-vkm-2018-16-factors.html

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018

***> Norway New additional requirements for imports of hay and straw for animal feed from countries outside the EEA due to CWD TSE Prion

https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_d...v_ved_import_av_hoy_og_halm_til_dyrefor.32299

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/10/norway-new-additional-requirements-for.html

infection rates
VKM has considered a number of different factors that affect the spread of sickness sickness within and out of the Nordfjella area. The area covers the entire Aurland, Lærdal and Hemsedal municipalities and parts of Ål, Hol, Eidfjord and Ulvik municipalities. Central to the area is the Nordfjella wild reindeer area, which is divided into a northern Zone 1 and a southern Zone 2. In Zone 1, the wild reindeer was exterminated to combat acne disease.

  • There is likely to be infection in the areas used by the wild reindeer that has been eradicated in Zone 1. The amount of infection is greatest in places that the wild reindeer frequently visited.
  • Infected cervids can still be found in the area that have not been discovered and new cervids can be infected from the environment in Zone 1. It is most likely to find infected individuals in the reindeer flock in Zone 2, among deer in Lærdal and Aurland and in the Tamrein flock on Filefjell. . Nor can it be ruled out that the transport of reindeer has spread infected animals to other areas.
  • There is the greatest likelihood of spreading sickness sickness from the environment in zone 1. This can happen by the fact that wild reindeer from Zone 2, deer from Lærdal and Aurland or domestic reindeer from Filefjell enter Zone 1 and become infected. Deer, moose and deer from Hallingdal are somewhat less likely to be infected in this way, and even less likely that humans, predators, scavengers and others carry infection that spread to new deer.
  • Sheep grazing in Zone 1 is likely to carry contagious infection to cervids. It is unlikely that it will happen to every single sheep, but thousands of sheep graze in the area.
salt Place
The infectious agent in sickly, misfolded prions is very hardy. The prions can remain contagious in the environment for many years. They have the ability to bind to soil, and they can be absorbed into plants. Infected animals can excrete prions, for example, through saliva, urine and stools, and thus infect other animals directly. The infection can also remain in the environment and be picked up by animals susceptible to infection.

-The number of salt sites that the extinct wild reindeer stock has used and which are still available to animals, will have a very important impact on how likely it is with the spread of infection from the environment, says Bjørnar Ytrehus. He has led the academic work on the update.

- If the salt sites become completely inaccessible, deer entering the Zone 1 are much less likely to be infected. Absence of salt sites will also reduce the likelihood of sheep spreading infection, he continues.

- If infected animals are still present or new animals are infected from the environment, newly created salt sites and salt sites outside Zone 1 will also increase the likelihood of infection spread, emphasizes Ytrehus.

Monitoring and preparedness
Significant uncertainty is attached to the factors identified. The probability of spreading infection can be minimized by maintaining intensive monitoring, alertness and readiness.

-In addition, the likelihood of infection spreading will be less with fewer salt spots and other animal collection sites. Measures such as fencing and herding, reducing deer game populations and information to people who use the area will also reduce the likelihood of spreading, Ytrehus says.

VKM's professional group for hygiene and infectious agents is responsible for the assessment.

https://vkm.no/risikovurderinger/al...avskrantesyke.4.401ade1116653f1aef54cffa.html

see more here;

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2019

Norway Eradication of Chronic Wasting Disease is not completed

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/02/norway-eradication-of-chronic-wasting.html

kind regards, terry
 

Browning Slayer

Official GON Forum Meme Poster
two things.

1. sometimes feed mills use corn to clean out their mixers and such, where ruminant mammalian protein was manufactured. this is a NO NO...and this was before anyone knew that cwd would transmit to pigs by oral route...now we know this, and the mad cow feed ban should be changed immediately, or were all just peeing in the wind imo...

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

April 9, 2001 WARNING LETTER
.
01-PHI-12 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Brian J. Raymond, Owner Sandy Lake Mills 26 Mill Street P.O. Box 117 Sandy Lake, PA 16145 PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT

Tel: 215-597-4390

Dear Mr. Raymond:

Food and Drug Administration Investigator Gregory E. Beichner conducted an inspection of your animal feed manufacturing operation, located in Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, on March 23, 2001, and determined that your firm manufactures animal feeds including feeds containing prohibited materials. The inspection found significant deviations from the requirements set forth in Title 21, code of Federal Regulations, part 589.2000 - Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to prevent the establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) . Such deviations cause products being manufactured at this facility to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(f), of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act).

Our investigation found failure to label your swine feed with the required cautionary statement "Do Not Feed to cattle or other Ruminants" The FDA suggests that the statement be distinguished by different type-size or color or other means of highlighting the statement so that it is easily noticed by a purchaser.

In addition, we note that you are using approximately 140 pounds of cracked corn to flush your mixer used in the manufacture of animal feeds containing prohibited material. This flushed material is fed to wild game including deer, a ruminant animal. Feed material which may potentially contain prohibited material should not be fed to ruminant animals which may become part of the food chain.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deviations from the regulations. As a manufacturer of materials intended for animal feed use, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation and the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with the law. We have enclosed a copy of FDA's Small Entity Compliance Guide to assist you with complying with the regulation... blah, blah, blah...

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g1115d.pdf

2nd anything, including corn, feed, food plots, salt licks, mineral licks, that bring large numbers of cervid together in one spot, where they will be congregated into one area feeding, crapping, peeing, drooling, etc, is a petri dish for the cwd tse prion.

look, folks are either all in, or all out, you are dealing with something there that is like the plague.

Norway just banned hay, straw, and i imagine grains will be next, from countries with cwd tse prion...see;

***> NORWAY CWD UPDATE December 2018 Report from the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment (VKM) 2018: 16

Factors that can contribute to spread of CWD – an update on the situation in Nordfjella, Norway

Opinion of Panel on biological hazards of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment 13.12.2018 ISBN: 978-82-8259-316-8 ISSN: 2535-4019 Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment (VKM) Po 222 Skøyen 0213 Oslo Norway FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2018 Norway, Nordfjella VKM 2018 16

Factors that can contribute to spread of CWD TSE Prion UPDATE December 14, 2018

https://vkm.no/download/18.696229a71677d983532c0c11/1544792739325/CWD factors for spread 2018.pdf

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/12/norway-nordfjella-vkm-2018-16-factors.html

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018

***> Norway New additional requirements for imports of hay and straw for animal feed from countries outside the EEA due to CWD TSE Prion

https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_d...v_ved_import_av_hoy_og_halm_til_dyrefor.32299

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/10/norway-new-additional-requirements-for.html

infection rates
VKM has considered a number of different factors that affect the spread of sickness sickness within and out of the Nordfjella area. The area covers the entire Aurland, Lærdal and Hemsedal municipalities and parts of Ål, Hol, Eidfjord and Ulvik municipalities. Central to the area is the Nordfjella wild reindeer area, which is divided into a northern Zone 1 and a southern Zone 2. In Zone 1, the wild reindeer was exterminated to combat acne disease.

  • There is likely to be infection in the areas used by the wild reindeer that has been eradicated in Zone 1. The amount of infection is greatest in places that the wild reindeer frequently visited.
  • Infected cervids can still be found in the area that have not been discovered and new cervids can be infected from the environment in Zone 1. It is most likely to find infected individuals in the reindeer flock in Zone 2, among deer in Lærdal and Aurland and in the Tamrein flock on Filefjell. . Nor can it be ruled out that the transport of reindeer has spread infected animals to other areas.
  • There is the greatest likelihood of spreading sickness sickness from the environment in zone 1. This can happen by the fact that wild reindeer from Zone 2, deer from Lærdal and Aurland or domestic reindeer from Filefjell enter Zone 1 and become infected. Deer, moose and deer from Hallingdal are somewhat less likely to be infected in this way, and even less likely that humans, predators, scavengers and others carry infection that spread to new deer.
  • Sheep grazing in Zone 1 is likely to carry contagious infection to cervids. It is unlikely that it will happen to every single sheep, but thousands of sheep graze in the area.
salt Place
The infectious agent in sickly, misfolded prions is very hardy. The prions can remain contagious in the environment for many years. They have the ability to bind to soil, and they can be absorbed into plants. Infected animals can excrete prions, for example, through saliva, urine and stools, and thus infect other animals directly. The infection can also remain in the environment and be picked up by animals susceptible to infection.

-The number of salt sites that the extinct wild reindeer stock has used and which are still available to animals, will have a very important impact on how likely it is with the spread of infection from the environment, says Bjørnar Ytrehus. He has led the academic work on the update.

- If the salt sites become completely inaccessible, deer entering the Zone 1 are much less likely to be infected. Absence of salt sites will also reduce the likelihood of sheep spreading infection, he continues.

- If infected animals are still present or new animals are infected from the environment, newly created salt sites and salt sites outside Zone 1 will also increase the likelihood of infection spread, emphasizes Ytrehus.

Monitoring and preparedness
Significant uncertainty is attached to the factors identified. The probability of spreading infection can be minimized by maintaining intensive monitoring, alertness and readiness.

-In addition, the likelihood of infection spreading will be less with fewer salt spots and other animal collection sites. Measures such as fencing and herding, reducing deer game populations and information to people who use the area will also reduce the likelihood of spreading, Ytrehus says.

VKM's professional group for hygiene and infectious agents is responsible for the assessment.

https://vkm.no/risikovurderinger/al...avskrantesyke.4.401ade1116653f1aef54cffa.html

see more here;

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2019

Norway Eradication of Chronic Wasting Disease is not completed

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/02/norway-eradication-of-chronic-wasting.html

kind regards, terry
So.. was that a yes or no? Is my corn creating CWD? If so.. I need to change feed...

If I’m feeding fish. Should I change their diet too? I don’t need my fish catching it either.

I dump about 1,000 lbs of minerals a year.

Can I treat my area for coyotes?
 
Last edited:
So.. was that a yes or no? Is my corn creating CWD? If so.. I need to change feed...

If I’m feeding fish. Should I change their diet too? I don’t need my fish catching it either.

I dump about 1,000 lbs of minerals a year.

Can I treat my area for coyotes?
Truth is NOBODY on earth can make heads or tails from his CWD posts.
They are so clogged, so looong, so many links that are linked to other links, doctors, books, other reads old vs new and just plain jiberish rolled into one post. All his posts are clogged.
But I try to read em anyway and come away plain tired.
 
I don’t see the deer feeding guys commenting on this one. All they care about is how much protein goes into the horns.
 
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