Deer Ages

jcdona

Senior Member
Thread starter #5
Me too. But I was very surprised when I got a look at the teeth. I knew that the second one was younger but thought he was 3. No going back now.
 
#8
I shot a good buck a few years ago and took the antlers and the jawbone to the truck buck scoring. I had photos of the deer as a very nice 10 point from three years prior. With that and his body, I am confident that he was at least 3.5 and possibly 4.5 at that time. So, when I killed him he was at least 6.5 possibly 7.5.

The biologist, after looking at his jawbone, said he was 2.5 to 3.5. That’s when I lost confidence in aging based solely on the jawbone. (And no, the habitat the deer was taken is typical middle Georgia habitat so that shouldn’t play a big factor in scoring a typical Georgia deer)
 
#9
I shot a good buck a few years ago and took the antlers and the jawbone to the truck buck scoring. I had photos of the deer as a very nice 10 point from three years prior. With that and his body, I am confident that he was at least 3.5 and possibly 4.5 at that time. So, when I killed him he was at least 6.5 possibly 7.5.

The biologist, after looking at his jawbone, said he was 2.5 to 3.5. That’s when I lost confidence in aging based solely on the jawbone. (And no, the habitat the deer was taken is typical middle Georgia habitat so that shouldn’t play a big factor in scoring a typical Georgia deer)
Guy at our club killed one we had on cam for four years then had someone age the jaw bone at 3.5.
A few weeks ago my son and I both killed bucks. Neither had been on trail cam. My deer was was 175 his was 150. My deer looked like it had been through a war his looked like it was raised in a pen. Taxidermist said mine was 6.5 which I wasn't surprised. He said my sons was 5.5 which was shocking. Though my sons bucks rack scored one inch bigger than mine.
 
#10
I shot a good buck a few years ago and took the antlers and the jawbone to the truck buck scoring. I had photos of the deer as a very nice 10 point from three years prior. With that and his body, I am confident that he was at least 3.5 and possibly 4.5 at that time. So, when I killed him he was at least 6.5 possibly 7.5.

The biologist, after looking at his jawbone, said he was 2.5 to 3.5. That’s when I lost confidence in aging based solely on the jawbone. (And no, the habitat the deer was taken is typical middle Georgia habitat so that shouldn’t play a big factor in scoring a typical Georgia deer)
I wonder if feeding and plots are throwing kinks into aging by teeth. Meaning that if a deer is eating lots of plots/ Soft forage and softer pellets does it make his teeth not wear as much. Making his teeth look younger than he is? I wonder if any biologists have looked into this? Maybe something they can study at UGA or Auburn?
 
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