DNR biologists consider CWD a real threat to Georgia's deer herd

I would say that

because to this day, and many more to come, I don't care where you hunt whitetail deer, a bullet (or a truck) is the end to most deer West of the Mississippi. Very, very few deer, buck or doe, live to see a death by old age.

Are there some that do, sure, but they have some where to live where there is nobody hunting them. To have the unkillable, you have to have the unhuntable.

Now, if you have a lot of land, and you let nobody hunt, and you are trying to raise a world record whitetail deer, for whatever reason.....you have cause for concern.

The rest of us are lucky to see a buck over 3 1/2 years old. Very lucky

s&r
 

kickers

Senior Member
Because his take is no different then any other biologists out there. They don't like baiting because it is another vector "that can", but is not proven to, spread the disease, he knows that states that already have it have found no way to contain it and are learning to live with the disease and that the best treatment for the disease is to just not get it in your state. He also knows that CWD is not started by baiting. No reason to fight, we know his stance and he knows the proponents of baiting's stance.

Any time you gather animals in close quarters you have a chance to spread disease quickly and easily. Anybody should agree to that. I’m not against feeding deer but Year around feeding can be very risky IMO. WHY THE HECK CAN YOU GUYS HUNT WITHOUT THE GOLDEN NUGGETT ??
GEEEEZZZZZ.... Its pitiful !!!
 
MONDAY, JANUARY 14, 2019

Evaluation of iatrogenic risk of CJD transmission associated with Chronic Wasting Disease TSE Prion in Texas TAHC TPWD

It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is NOT, an area which we call the Twilight Zone, but an area that believes junk science, and the very industries and lobbyist some Texas Hunters, the cervid industry, that insist on shoving the fake news down their throats, we call this ted nugent junk science, and in TEXAS, sometimes you just can't fix stupid, this is where the rubber meets the road, here's your sign!

chronic wasting disease cwd tse prion aka mad deer elk disease, if you consume a cwd tse prion positive cervid, then months, years, decades later, go on to have surgery, dental, ophthalmology, endoscopy, donate tissue, blood, organs, you then expose those medical theaters and tissue, blood, organs, that are incubating the infectious cwd tse prion disease, to everyone that comes in contact.

these are not memes, these are actual statements from hunters/industry in Texas about CWD tse prion.

God help them, and us...terry

''Got a call today from TPWD, I’ve got a mule deer that tested early positive for CWD. I’m soon to turn into a zombie because I have already been eating it. They advised not to consume any of the meat...too late! They want to come confiscate what meat is left once they get more results back from another lab.''

snip...

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/01/evaluation-of-iatrogenic-risk-of-cjd.html

JUST OUT! ''This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.''

Rapid recontamination of a farm building occurs after attempted prion removal

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.105054

Kevin Christopher Gough, BSc (Hons), PhD1, Claire Alison Baker, BSc (Hons)2, Steve Hawkins, MIBiol3, Hugh Simmons, BVSc, MRCVS, MBA, MA3, Timm Konold, DrMedVet, PhD, MRCVS3 and Ben Charles Maddison, BSc (Hons), PhD2


snip...

Discussion

The authors' previous work on this farm indicated that dust harbours low levels of mobile scrapie prions that can accumulate on surfaces16 and this is likely to perpetuate transmission of scrapie within such a farm environment.12 In addition, previous in vitro modelling of scrapie prions bound to a concrete ‘fomite’ demonstrated that prion seeding activity could be inactivated by four applications of 20,000 ppm free chlorine as measured by a sPMCA assay. This previous modelling demonstrated that residual contamination of the swab extract with hypochlorite at levels which would inhibit the sPMCA are unlikely, and the authors consider these results as reduction in seeding titre.17 Here, this same decontamination methodology was tested within a farm-scale study which also included steps to remove dust within the barns. This study demonstrated that this thorough decontamination method applied to a farm with a high incidence of naturally acquired scrapie was sufficient to remove scrapie prions on surfaces to levels that were undetectable by sPMCA, one of the most sensitive biochemical assays for prions. The authors' sPMCA assay has an limit of detection of around 1–10pg scrapie-infected sheep brain per sPMCA reaction. The authors assume that the samples negative by sPMCA had less than this amount (of brain equivalent) within the extracts that were prepared. This treatment together with measures designed to minimise the amount of dust retained within the buildings (vacuuming all surfaces, pressure washing and then hypochlorite treatment) was expected to have removed all infectivity from the buildings and the concrete areas surrounding them, and it was anticipated that the sheep bioassay would confirm absence of infective prion.

However, the introduction into this decontaminated barn of 25 VRQ/VRQ sheep (a genotype highly susceptible to classical scrapie) demonstrated that all animals, with the exception of 1 lamb that died at 122 dpe, had detectable PrPSc in lymphoid tissue, indicating infection with the scrapie agent. This included 14 animals (54 per cent) that were PrPSc-positive on the first RAMALT analysis at 372 dpe or 419 dpe. Although infected sheep were removed based on a positive RAMALT result, it is possible that lateral transmission or subsequent contamination of the environment from infected sheep had contributed to the rapid spread of scrapie in nearly all sheep. It has been shown previously that objects in contact with scrapie-infected sheep, such as water troughs and fence posts, can act as a reservoir for infection.23 As in the authors' previous study,12 the decontamination of this sheep barn was not effective at removing scrapie infectivity, and despite the extra measures brought into this study (more effective chemical treatment and removal of sources of dust) the overall rates of disease transmission mirror previous results on this farm. With such apparently effective decontamination (assuming that at least some sPMCA seeding ability is coincident with infectivity), how was infectivity able to persist within the environment and where does infectivity reside? Dust samples were collected in both the bioassay barn and also a barn subject to the same decontamination regime within the same farm (but remaining unoccupied). Within both of these barns dust had accumulated for three months that was able to seed sPMCA, indicating the accumulation of scrapie-containing material that was independent of the presence of sheep that may have been incubating and possibly shedding low amounts of infectivity.

This study clearly demonstrates the difficulty in removing scrapie infectivity from the farm environment. Practical and effective prion decontamination methods are still urgently required for decontamination of scrapie infectivity from farms that have had cases of scrapie and this is particularly relevant for scrapiepositive goatherds, which currently have limited genetic resistance to scrapie within commercial breeds.24 This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.

Acknowledgements The authors thank the APHA farm staff, Tony Duarte, Olly Roberts and Margaret Newlands for preparation of the sheep pens and animal husbandry during the study. The authors also thank the APHA pathology team for RAMALT and postmortem examination.

Funding This study was funded by DEFRA within project SE1865.

Competing interests None declared.

https://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/early/2019/01/02/vr.105054.long

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Rapid recontamination of a farm building occurs after attempted prion removal

https://prionprp.blogspot.com/2019/01/rapid-recontamination-of-farm-building.html

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2018

***> Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion 2019 Where The Rubber Meets The Road

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/12/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse-prion.html

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 04, 2018

Cervid to human prion transmission 5R01NS088604-04 Update

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/10/cervid-to-human-prion-transmission.html

Saturday, December 15, 2018

***> ADRD Summit RFI Singeltary COMMENT SUBMISSION BSE, SCRAPIE, CWD, AND HUMAN TSE PRION DISEASE December 14, 2018

https://prionprp.blogspot.com/2018/12/adrd-summit-rfi-singeltary-comment.html

TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019

***> CHILDHOOD EXPOSURE TO CADAVERIC DURA Singeltary et al

https://betaamyloidcjd.blogspot.com/2019/01/childhood-exposure-to-cadaveric-dura.html


kind regards, terry
 
I notice all you guys bashing lampern don't have much in the way of rebuttal to Mr. Killmaster. How come dat is? Don't want to be embarrassed with facts and data in public by the wildlife biologist responsible for managing whitetail deer in this state?

I don't know why all you outhouse wildlife biologists are afraid to take on Mr. Killmaster. I'm sure he can easily be proven wrong by one of you making a tour de force presentation. Surely one of you has the guts to take him on, mano y mano?
I have and got jumped on by others here for daring to disagree with Georgia DNR. Criticising any other government agency is allowed here but not DNR.
 
TEXAS BREEDER DEER ESCAPEE WITH CWD IN THE WILD, or so the genetics would show?

OH NO, please tell me i heard this wrong, a potential Texas captive escapee with cwd in the wild, in an area with positive captive cwd herd?

apparently, no ID though. tell me it ain't so please...

23:00 minute mark

''Free Ranging Deer, Dr. Deyoung looked at Genetics of this free ranging deer and what he found was, that the genetics on this deer were more similar to captive deer, than the free ranging population, but he did not see a significant connection to any one captive facility that he analyzed, so we believe, Ahhhhhh, this animal had some captive ahhh, whatnot.''


Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Symposium 2018 posted January 2019 VIDEO SET 18 CLIPS

See Wisconsin update...terrible news, right after Texas updated map around 5 minute mark...


update on Wisconsin from Tammy Ryan...


Wyoming CWD Dr. Mary Wood

''first step is admitting you have a problem''

''Wyoming was behind the curve''

wyoming has a problem...


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2019

Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Symposium 2018 posted January 2019 VIDEO SET 18 CLIPS

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/01/texas-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse.html

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2019

TEXAS REPORTS 2 MORE CWD TSE PRION ALL WILD CERVID TOTAL TO DATE 141

http:// https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/diseases/cwd/tracking/

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/01/texas-reports-2-more-cwd-tse-prion-all.html
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I have and got jumped on by others here for daring to disagree with Georgia DNR. Criticising any other government agency is allowed here but not DNR.

Do you have a link to this? If so, post it.
 
That's all real neat and stuff, but the folks out in Colorado, where this all started don't seem near as concerned as those wishing to over politicize this issue.

https://www.denverpost.com/2014/07/...asting-disease-not-a-factor-in-deers-decline/
Colorado Chronic Wasting Disease Response Plan December 2018

I. Executive Summary Mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose are highly valued species in North America. Some of Colorado’s herds of these species are increasingly becoming infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD). As of July 2018, at least 31 of Colorado's 54 deer herds (57%), 16 of 43 elk herds (37%), and 2 of 9 moose herds (22%) are known to be infected with CWD. Four of Colorado's 5 largest deer herds and 2 of the state’s 5 largest elk herds are infected. Deer herds tend to be more heavily infected than elk and moose herds living in the same geographic area. Not only are the number of infected herds increasing, the past 15 years of disease trends generally show an increase in the proportion of infected animals within herds as well. Of most concern, greater than a 10-fold increase in CWD prevalence has been estimated in some mule deer herds since the early 2000s; CWD is now adversely affecting the performance of these herds.

snip...

IMPORTANT PUBLIC HEALTH MESSAGE

Disease in humans resulting from CWD exposure has not been reported to date. However, public health officials cannot determine there is no risk from eating meat from infected animals. Consequently, officials recommend that people avoid exposure to CWD-infected animals. Please see the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment website ( http://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/priondiseases ) for the most current recommendations on carcass testing and other preventive measures.

To minimize exposure to CWD and other diseases of potential concern, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) and state public health officials advise hunters not to shoot, handle or consume any deer, elk or moose that is acting abnormally or appears to be sick. When fielddressing game, wear rubber gloves and minimize the use of a bone saw to cut through the brain or spinal cord (backbone). Minimize contact with brain or spinal cord tissues, eyes, spleen or lymph nodes. Always wash hands and utensils thoroughly after dressing and processing game meat.

(the map on page 71, cwd marked in red, is shocking...tss)

https://cpw.state.co.us/Documents/RulesRegs/Brochure/BigGame/biggame.pdf

snip...see full report and more updated science on cwd tse prion here;

TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2019

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is addressing Chronic Wasting Disease with its CWD Response Plan

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/03/colorado-parks-and-wildlife-is.html

THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2019

USDA APHIS CDC Cervids: Chronic Wasting Disease Specifics Updated 2019

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/03/usda-aphis-cdc-cervids-chronic-wasting.html

MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2019 Canada

CFIA Notice to Industry Updates to the federal management of chronic wasting disease in farmed March 15th, 2019

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/04/canada-cfia-notice-to-industry-updates.html

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 03, 2019

Estimating the amount of Chronic Wasting Disease infectivity passing through abattoirs and field slaughter

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/04/estimating-amount-of-chronic-wasting.html

TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2019

Pathobiology, Genetics, and Detection of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies 2018 Annual Report

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/04/pathobiology-genetics-and-detection-of.html


kind regards, terry
 

treadwell

Senior Member
"I could be wrong, but I think that high-fence deer farming is the main spreader of this disease, and is the main thing we need to guard against?[/QUOTE]

AGREE..... (not sure how ya'll do that quote thing, you get the idea though. ) Seems like it sure pops up around the pens in some cases.
 

treadwell

Senior Member
Question....to Killmaster. (it may have been asked already, but I couldn't stay focused to read every post, PTSD, ADD or whatever...lol). IS OUTLAWING URINE part of the new CWD plan for Ga? If so, will we be given one season to use up the case of Buck Bomb I have?
 
Question....to Killmaster. (it may have been asked already, but I couldn't stay focused to read every post, PTSD, ADD or whatever...lol). IS OUTLAWING URINE part of the new CWD plan for Ga? If so, will we be given one season to use up the case of Buck Bomb I have?
At this point, no. However, we recommend that you use synthetic urine or a brand bearing the ATA Checkmark signifying very low risk sources for the urine.
 
I hope that some of you who were on here bashing the very guys trying to save our deer herd looked at some the data presented in this thread. If you did, I assume you now know that CWD is a huge threat to our way of life and anything that we can do to try and stop that from happening should be on the table. We can either fight it now or fight it later. Better to be proactive than reactive in this case, or we will be like Wisconsin and Wyoming.
 

shdw633

Senior Member
I hope that some of you who were on here bashing the very guys trying to save our deer herd looked at some the data presented in this thread. If you did, I assume you now know that CWD is a huge threat to our way of life and anything that we can do to try and stop that from happening should be on the table. We can either fight it now or fight it later. Better to be proactive than reactive in this case, or we will be like Wisconsin and Wyoming.
Exactly how is it in Wyoming or Wisconsin?? What has changed so drastically?? People are still hunting, killing and eating deer. Michigan has CWD as does Illinois and many other mid-western states and they are still hunting and killing deer, I know, I hunt, kill and eat them every year. So what exactly has changed as far as "threatening our way of life" as you say? This is not to say that CWD should not be taken seriously but to what extent?? It's not like this disease has not been around for decades and yet states that have had it for decades are still some of the best hunting states in the country.
 
Exactly how is it in Wyoming or Wisconsin?? What has changed so drastically?? People are still hunting, killing and eating deer. Michigan has CWD as does Illinois and many other mid-western states and they are still hunting and killing deer, I know, I hunt, kill and eat them every year. So what exactly has changed as far as "threatening our way of life" as you say? This is not to say that CWD should not be taken seriously but to what extent?? It's not like this disease has not been around for decades and yet states that have had it for decades are still some of the best hunting states in the country.
It takes 25 to 50 years to start seeing population level impacts. In some areas nearly 50% of the mature deer test positive. This won't end deer hunting, but just imagine having to test every deer before you eat it and having to throw every other one in the garbage. While many of those states have CWD, it's not like it's widespread across the entire state. If you go to ground zero where the prevalence rates are highest, it certainly has impacted hunting.
 

shdw633

Senior Member
If you go to ground zero where the prevalence rates are highest, it certainly has impacted hunting.
But wasn't that due to them slaughtering every deer in an attempt to eradicate the disease before it spread farther?
 
But wasn't that due to them slaughtering every deer in an attempt to eradicate the disease before it spread farther?
You're going to see a reduction either way. Areas that have done very focused culling have been able to keep prevalence low and minimize the spread. Those areas that quit culling have higher disease prevalence and the impacted area is much larger. Over the longer term, those populations will decline. Current hunter harvest rates will continually have to be reduced as disease prevalence increases to maintain a viable population. While it does take CWD 18 months to kill a deer, a CWD positive animal is 4.5 times more likely to die by other means than a healthy deer.

Here's a good article comparing Illinois management to Wisconsin after Wisconsin shut down culling. Also a couple of other articles that may be of interest:

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0186512
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161127
 

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