Dogging Bear Quota Hunt

What exactly do you mean when you say “the state was against it, but the biologists could not refute the evidence?” This was a political decision from the top down to appease a very vocal group. I spoke with several biologists who were not in favor of the hunt but it was pushed through anyway. This decision had nothing to do with trying to reduce bear numbers. I’ve read the report, and it states that the dog hunt will have no significant impact on bear populations so one could conclude that reducing bear numbers is not one of the purposes of the hunt. Something doesn’t add up.
Jbogg, it has everything to do with biology and reducing bear numbers. But also with an even more productive method of removing bears than can be accomplished through traditional still hunting. There is really no practical reason for not having dog hunting other than the simple fact that some don’t understand it and are against it for whatever reasons or conclusions they draw. The state didn’t want to deal without the backlash from disgruntled hunters because this has been a battle for around 20 years in Georgia.

I’m sure you’ve noticed that everything is worded cryptically so as to keep the masses at bay or to leave interpretation room because not everything is as cut and dry as we wish it were. The sample size of the units being hunted is not large enough to declare any significant change in numbers when taken into the whole regions area. (50,000 acres isn’t going to change all of North Georgia’s bear population). It will however, give them a baseline research number as to just how effective it might be in that specific area.

I know you are new to hunting in this area, I feel you might be new to hunting in general. I’m grateful that you seem to want to understand and not take everything at face value. We are at war in this country, with people who want to take away our liberties. Losing any form of hunting is a loss on our behalf. Many do not understand that and are willingly aiding the mass movement to eliminate us all. Luckily, our state still has some sanity left and we have people who truly care about providing for our future. If we can nurture sound hunting practices and keep numbers of all game in Check their will be no need for government interference. You probably remember supply and demand charts and what happens when big brother intervenes. Seems more people are worried about what they are gonna get out of it than what we all might gain in the future.

I’ll say it again for others, keep calm and let the bear hounds have a chance. If successful, everyone will benefit. If not, it will be done away with. It’s not the end of the world unless you have a different agenda you are actually trying to push. We all won, the State granted us another form of hunting when other states are closing doors on it.
 
Fair Chase and the Survival of Hunting

Ethical choices in hunting are more important today than at any previous time. Hunter’s values—their motivations and their conduct—shape society’s opinion of hunting. A recent scientific survey conducted by Mark Damien Duda of Responsive Management indicates that American’s approval of hunting remains high. The study found that 77% of American adults strongly or moderately approve of hunting, however this support is conditional rather than absolute. Approval of hunting tends to vary considerably according to species, and method of hunting. Equally important to Americans’ overall approval of hunting is the motivation for hunting. American adults overwhelmingly approve of hunting for food (85% of all respondents expressed strong or moderate approval), to protect humans from harm (85%), for animal population control (83%), for wildlife management (81%) or to protect property (71%). However, approval diminishes considerably when respondents are asked about hunting for the sport (53% approve), to supplement income (44%), hunting on Sundays (41%), for the challenge (40%) or for a trophy (28%). While more than half of American adults strongly or moderately support hunting with dogs (57%), less than half support any of the other hunting methods asked about in the survey: hunting using special scents that attract game (36%), hunting over bait (27%), hunting using high tech gear (20%) or hunting in a high fence preserve (20%). This number climbs to 48% for hunters with limited mobility hunting within a high fence preserve.

In any democracy, society decides what is acceptable or unacceptable, and therefore what stays and what goes. Hunting traditions are potentially at risk if the majority of citizens develop a negative perception of hunting, whether this perception is justified or not. Ethics may be a matter of choice, but the actions of individuals can come to represent the entire group and it is important that hunters understand this.

https://www.boone-crockett.org/pdf/On_Fair_Chase.pdf
 
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Fair Chase and the Survival of Hunting

Ethical choices in hunting are more important today than at any previous time. Hunter’s values—their motivations and their conduct—shape society’s opinion of hunting. A recent scientific survey conducted by Mark Damien Duda of Responsive Management indicates that American’s approval of hunting remains high. The study found that 77% of American adults strongly or moderately approve of hunting, however this support is conditional rather than absolute. Approval of hunting tends to vary considerably according to species, and method of hunting. Equally important to Americans’ overall approval of hunting is the motivation for hunting. American adults overwhelmingly approve of hunting for food (85% of all respondents expressed strong or moderate approval), to protect humans from harm (85%), for animal population control (83%), for wildlife management (81%) or to protect property (71%). However, approval diminishes considerably when respondents are asked about hunting for the sport (53% approve), to supplement income (44%), hunting on Sundays (41%), for the challenge (40%) or for a trophy (28%). While more than half of American adults strongly or moderately support hunting with dogs (57%), less than half support any of the other hunting methods asked about in the survey: hunting using special scents that attract game (36%), hunting over bait (27%), hunting using high tech gear (20%) or hunting in a high fence preserve (20%). This number climbs to 48% for hunters with limited mobility hunting within a high fence preserve.

In any democracy, society decides what is acceptable or unacceptable, and therefore what stays and what goes. Hunting traditions are potentially at risk if the majority of citizens develop a negative perception of hunting, whether this perception is justified or not. Ethics may be a matter of choice, but the actions of individuals can come to represent the entire group and it is important that hunters understand this.
Sure wish I had researched and found this before I wasted so much brain power.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
Jbogg, it has everything to do with biology and reducing bear numbers. But also with an even more productive method of removing bears than can be accomplished through traditional still hunting. There is really no practical reason for not having dog hunting other than the simple fact that some don’t understand it and are against it for whatever reasons or conclusions they draw. The state didn’t want to deal without the backlash from disgruntled hunters because this has been a battle for around 20 years in Georgia.

I’m sure you’ve noticed that everything is worded cryptically so as to keep the masses at bay or to leave interpretation room because not everything is as cut and dry as we wish it were. The sample size of the units being hunted is not large enough to declare any significant change in numbers when taken into the whole regions area. (50,000 acres isn’t going to change all of North Georgia’s bear population). It will however, give them a baseline research number as to just how effective it might be in that specific area.

I know you are new to hunting in this area, I feel you might be new to hunting in general. I’m grateful that you seem to want to understand and not take everything at face value. We are at war in this country, with people who want to take away our liberties. Losing any form of hunting is a loss on our behalf. Many do not understand that and are willingly aiding the mass movement to eliminate us all. Luckily, our state still has some sanity left and we have people who truly care about providing for our future. If we can nurture sound hunting practices and keep numbers of all game in Check their will be no need for government interference. You probably remember supply and demand charts and what happens when big brother intervenes. Seems more people are worried about what they are gonna get out of it than what we all might gain in the future.

I’ll say it again for others, keep calm and let the bear hounds have a chance. If successful, everyone will benefit. If not, it will be done away with. It’s not the end of the world unless you have a different agenda you are actually trying to push. We all won, the State granted us another form of hunting when other states are closing doors on it.
You are correct in that I am fairly new to hunting the mountains, but I’m trying to make up for lost time. I am not a new hunter however, as this will be my 30th year bow hunting. I know this was a big win for Hound Hunters, But I can’t see it as anything but a loss for bowhunters. Bow season on those WMAs has essentially been reduced to one week. Not much left to say about it. I will move over to NF after the early rifle hunt, but my worry is that after the two year trial the dog hunt will be expanded to include the entire NF which is why I am being so vocal now.
 
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jbogg

Senior Member
Fair Chase and the Survival of Hunting

Ethical choices in hunting are more important today than at any previous time. Hunter’s values—their motivations and their conduct—shape society’s opinion of hunting. A recent scientific survey conducted by Mark Damien Duda of Responsive Management indicates that American’s approval of hunting remains high. The study found that 77% of American adults strongly or moderately approve of hunting, however this support is conditional rather than absolute. Approval of hunting tends to vary considerably according to species, and method of hunting. Equally important to Americans’ overall approval of hunting is the motivation for hunting. American adults overwhelmingly approve of hunting for food (85% of all respondents expressed strong or moderate approval), to protect humans from harm (85%), for animal population control (83%), for wildlife management (81%) or to protect property (71%). However, approval diminishes considerably when respondents are asked about hunting for the sport (53% approve), to supplement income (44%), hunting on Sundays (41%), for the challenge (40%) or for a trophy (28%). While more than half of American adults strongly or moderately support hunting with dogs (57%), less than half support any of the other hunting methods asked about in the survey: hunting using special scents that attract game (36%), hunting over bait (27%), hunting using high tech gear (20%) or hunting in a high fence preserve (20%). This number climbs to 48% for hunters with limited mobility hunting within a high fence preserve.

In any democracy, society decides what is acceptable or unacceptable, and therefore what stays and what goes. Hunting traditions are potentially at risk if the majority of citizens develop a negative perception of hunting, whether this perception is justified or not. Ethics may be a matter of choice, but the actions of individuals can come to represent the entire group and it is important that hunters understand this.
Interesting stats. Not to split hairs but I'm guessing the majority of people in that study envision a lab shivering in a duck blind when they think of hunting with dogs. Show them a video of a catch dog grabbing a hog and your results probably change significantly. I do agree that hunters need to speak loudly and with one voice. Squeaky wheel gets the grease as evidenced by the Dog hunt. If hunter numbers keep declining at the current rate the antis will have the megaphone and politicians will do what politicians do. Over the years I have introduced a fair number of people to hunting, and have always tried to use some trailhead diplomacy when encountering curious hikers in the parking lot or on the trail. If I was a dog hunter I would invite some bow hunting non dog hunters along for the race and build some bridges where you can. It’s probably pretty obvious I don’t have much going on at work today. No promises, but I will try to make this my last post of the day.
 
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Interesting stats. Not to split hairs but I'm guessing the majority of people in that study envision a lab shivering in a duck blind when they think of hunting with dogs. Show them a video of a catch dog grabbing a hog and your results probably change significantly. I do agree that hunters need to speak loudly and with one voice. Squeaky wheel gets the grease as evidenced by the Dog hunt. If hunter numbers keep declining at the current rate the antis will have the megaphone and politicians will do what politicians do. Over the years I have introduced a fair number of people to hunting, and have always tried to use some trailhead diplomacy when encountering curious hikers in the parking lot or on the trail. If I was a dog hunter I would invite some bow hunting non dog hunters along for the race and build some bridges where you can. It’s probably pretty obvious I don’t have much going on at work today. No promises, but I will try to make this my last post of the day.
Lab in a duck blind or bird dog pointing a covey of quail or pheasant, either way 57% is a slim margin of majority support. I believe this is the most important statement to govern our actions as hunters:

In any democracy, society decides what is acceptable or unacceptable, and therefore what stays and what goes. Hunting traditions are potentially at risk if the majority of citizens develop a negative perception of hunting, whether this perception is justified or not. Ethics may be a matter of choice, but the actions of individuals can come to represent the entire group and it is important that hunters understand this.
 
I know I’m a little late to this party but I’m proud of the direction Georgia has stepped. As a dog hunter I can say this. As an all around hunter I can understand why people are upset.

The season dates aren’t perfect and the state seems to be flying by the seat of their pants (hunt is supposed to be in September but the quota isn’t even open yet). In my opinion the absolute ideal season dates would be directly after turkey season closes. Bears are moving and searching for food the most at this point. No one would loose any bow hunting time in September and I believe everyone would get along better and the dog guys would have more support from people that just don’t understand.

I will be applying for the quota along with several hunting buddies. If not selected I would love to come be a dog man for a party. I’ll be returning home from Canada with my hounds about a week before this hunt and will have everything in top notch shape before a 9 day hunt. I will already have several kills for the year to my hounds before the hunt also.

To the people who don’t really understand how hunting with dogs works I would be a huge asset. My hounds see anywhere from 75-100 bears a year and are seasoned vets. You don’t just walk through the woods with a dog and kill bears. It’s the most physically challenging type of hunting east of the Mississippi and not uncommon to walk 10+ miles per day.

I simply want to put my name out there with my hunting partner as an option to 100% guarantee you a bear. We would never be interested in shooting unless we got on a big bear on the ground that didnt want to climb and was hurting dogs. It’s all about dog work with us.

We hunt north Georgia often with hounds during the training season and normally tree at least 2 bears a morning and it’s not uncommon to have split races and end up on 3 or 4 bears. We have 10 dogs between the 2 of us and rotate them in a very thought out way so we can hunt every day. (For the people who don’t understand this.) dogs aren’t machines and they get tired. Unless you have short races they can’t run to a superior caliber every day no matter what their conditioning is. We normally run no more than 4-5 dogs at a time on a bear to maximize our days. This may sound crazy to some but we hunt 150 days a year and do our best to keep each dog in great health. They are part of the family and part of our team.

At the end of the day all I’m trying to get out there is that if you get drawn and want to be guaranteed bears give me a call. I have thousands of hours of videos and pictures (not sure if those can be put on here or not, I’m new to the forum). I spend countless days training hounds in multiple states and all the way to Canada and back. I would love nothing more than for someone to bring a few kids to get their first bears because that’s where the future of our sport lies. God bless and happy hunting.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
I know I’m a little late to this party but I’m proud of the direction Georgia has stepped. As a dog hunter I can say this. As an all around hunter I can understand why people are upset.

The season dates aren’t perfect and the state seems to be flying by the seat of their pants (hunt is supposed to be in September but the quota isn’t even open yet). In my opinion the absolute ideal season dates would be directly after turkey season closes. Bears are moving and searching for food the most at this point. No one would loose any bow hunting time in September and I believe everyone would get along better and the dog guys would have more support from people that just don’t understand.

I will be applying for the quota along with several hunting buddies. If not selected I would love to come be a dog man for a party. I’ll be returning home from Canada with my hounds about a week before this hunt and will have everything in top notch shape before a 9 day hunt. I will already have several kills for the year to my hounds before the hunt also.

To the people who don’t really understand how hunting with dogs works I would be a huge asset. My hounds see anywhere from 75-100 bears a year and are seasoned vets. You don’t just walk through the woods with a dog and kill bears. It’s the most physically challenging type of hunting east of the Mississippi and not uncommon to walk 10+ miles per day.

I simply want to put my name out there with my hunting partner as an option to 100% guarantee you a bear. We would never be interested in shooting unless we got on a big bear on the ground that didnt want to climb and was hurting dogs. It’s all about dog work with us.

We hunt north Georgia often with hounds during the training season and normally tree at least 2 bears a morning and it’s not uncommon to have split races and end up on 3 or 4 bears. We have 10 dogs between the 2 of us and rotate them in a very thought out way so we can hunt every day. (For the people who don’t understand this.) dogs aren’t machines and they get tired. Unless you have short races they can’t run to a superior caliber every day no matter what their conditioning is. We normally run no more than 4-5 dogs at a time on a bear to maximize our days. This may sound crazy to some but we hunt 150 days a year and do our best to keep each dog in great health. They are part of the family and part of our team.

At the end of the day all I’m trying to get out there is that if you get drawn and want to be guaranteed bears give me a call. I have thousands of hours of videos and pictures (not sure if those can be put on here or not, I’m new to the forum). I spend countless days training hounds in multiple states and all the way to Canada and back. I would love nothing more than for someone to bring a few kids to get their first bears because that’s where the future of our sport lies. God bless and happy hunting.
I was always told that the reason they won’t do a spring hunt is because there is to much risk of separating a Sow from some very young cubs. Not sure if that is the reason, but it makes sense if true.
 

gobbleinwoods

Daily Driveler News Team
Has anyone's position changed in 169 posts?
 
You could kill every bear on the WMAs they propose the quota hunts on and it wouldn't have any effect on the over all population up here. And the USFS will never allow such like they do in NC and SC, no time soon anyways !
 

j_seph

Senior Member
You are correct in that I am fairly new to hunting the mountains, but I’m trying to make up for lost time. I am not a new hunter however, as this will be my 30th year bow hunting. I know this was a big win for Hound Hunters, But I can’t see it as anything but a loss for bowhunters. Bow season on those WMAs has essentially been reduced to one week. Not much left to say about it. I will move over to NF after the early rifle hunt, but my worry is that after the two year trial the dog hunt will be expanded to include the entire NF which is why I am being so vocal now.
20 years the hound hunters have lost. Time to let the 2nd string players come out and run some plays for the home team.
 

j_seph

Senior Member
I know I’m a little late to this party but I’m proud of the direction Georgia has stepped. As a dog hunter I can say this. As an all around hunter I can understand why people are upset.

The season dates aren’t perfect and the state seems to be flying by the seat of their pants (hunt is supposed to be in September but the quota isn’t even open yet). In my opinion the absolute ideal season dates would be directly after turkey season closes. Bears are moving and searching for food the most at this point. No one would loose any bow hunting time in September and I believe everyone would get along better and the dog guys would have more support from people that just don’t understand.

I will be applying for the quota along with several hunting buddies. If not selected I would love to come be a dog man for a party. I’ll be returning home from Canada with my hounds about a week before this hunt and will have everything in top notch shape before a 9 day hunt. I will already have several kills for the year to my hounds before the hunt also.

To the people who don’t really understand how hunting with dogs works I would be a huge asset. My hounds see anywhere from 75-100 bears a year and are seasoned vets. You don’t just walk through the woods with a dog and kill bears. It’s the most physically challenging type of hunting east of the Mississippi and not uncommon to walk 10+ miles per day.

I simply want to put my name out there with my hunting partner as an option to 100% guarantee you a bear. We would never be interested in shooting unless we got on a big bear on the ground that didnt want to climb and was hurting dogs. It’s all about dog work with us.

We hunt north Georgia often with hounds during the training season and normally tree at least 2 bears a morning and it’s not uncommon to have split races and end up on 3 or 4 bears. We have 10 dogs between the 2 of us and rotate them in a very thought out way so we can hunt every day. (For the people who don’t understand this.) dogs aren’t machines and they get tired. Unless you have short races they can’t run to a superior caliber every day no matter what their conditioning is. We normally run no more than 4-5 dogs at a time on a bear to maximize our days. This may sound crazy to some but we hunt 150 days a year and do our best to keep each dog in great health. They are part of the family and part of our team.

At the end of the day all I’m trying to get out there is that if you get drawn and want to be guaranteed bears give me a call. I have thousands of hours of videos and pictures (not sure if those can be put on here or not, I’m new to the forum). I spend countless days training hounds in multiple states and all the way to Canada and back. I would love nothing more than for someone to bring a few kids to get their first bears because that’s where the future of our sport lies. God bless and happy hunting.
I still feel this will be setup to be drawn you will have to have some sort of something pointing that you are a hound hunter like yourself.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
You could kill every bear on the WMAs they propose the quota hunts on and it wouldn't have any effect on the over all population up here. And the USFS will never allow such like they do in NC and SC, no time soon anyways !
What makes you think the USFS won’t allow it like North Carolina? I thought these next two years are a trial, and then the DNR would consider expanding the hunt.
 
What makes you think the USFS won’t allow it like North Carolina? I thought these next two years are a trial, and then the DNR would consider expanding the hunt.
Just thimk they will. DNR in SC treats gov't over there as game management. They pay a fee to do any kinda hunting, like our WMAs, on those lands across the board. Don't know how they do it in NC.
 
I was always told that the reason they won’t do a spring hunt is because there is to much risk of separating a Sow from some very young cubs. Not sure if that is the reason, but it makes sense if true.
It’s really no different than the training season that has occurred the same dates after turkey season for the last ten years. Sometimes you get after a sow and cubs but she will normally put them up a tree and stay close by fighting or tree somewhere else close by. They get right back together as soon as the race is over. I would never knowingly turn on a sow with cubs but the cubs leave very little to no sign in the woods so mistakes happen from time to time. No harm is done at the end of the day though.
 
I still feel this will be setup to be drawn you will have to have some sort of something pointing that you are a hound hunter like yourself.
In a way I hope this is true but I also want some guys that are completely against it to get to hunt. I’ll make my vow right here that if I get drawn I want to bring a couple guys and their bows that are set in their ways and let them shoot a bear over hounds with their bows.

I wish I knew when they were going to have meetings. I really wish they would view a spring hunt as an option so no hunting seasons are lost. I’m tickled to get to hunt as a dog hunter but I can honestly say I hate it for the die hard bow hunters that hunt these WMAS.
 
In a way I hope this is true but I also want some guys that are completely against it to get to hunt. I’ll make my vow right here that if I get drawn I want to bring a couple guys and their bows that are set in their ways and let them shoot a bear over hounds with their bows.

I wish I knew when they were going to have meetings. I really wish they would view a spring hunt as an option so no hunting seasons are lost. I’m tickled to get to hunt as a dog hunter but I can honestly say I hate it for the die hard bow hunters that hunt these WMAS.
Here is the Hunting Regulations Process and scheduled meetings:

https://georgiawildlife.com/hunting/regulationsprocess
 
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