Establishing a new food plot, advice needed

Thread starter #1
Through the years I’ve planted a lot of food plots, but like many of us, we just planted rye grass, mixed in with some clover, or what ever deer mix looked good at the local feed store. This year I bush hogged about an acre of a old grown up fescue pasture that was full of sweet gums, dogfennel, and numerous other weeds. I plowed it under more times than I can count, I did spray it once, even dragged it 3 separate times but still had coffee weed and some sweet gums coming up. I planted 50 pounds of Buck Forage Oats, and 3 bags of 7 Card Stud seed mix along with 200 pounds of 13/13/13, this past week I put out 200 pounds of 33/0/0. its the most beautiful food plot I’ve ever had. No I didn’t apply any lime, yes I know it needs it. Just as soon as Alabama deer season is over, I’ll probably put somewhere between a ton and 2 tons of lime on it. Next fall I plan on planting the Buck Forage Oats, and Trophy Banque, my question is, what should I do this summer to insure I’ve killed all the bad stuff and that it’s in the best possible shape for next fall? If I can figure out how to make the files smaller I’ll post a few picture.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
I had a plot that became fully taken over by an invasive species called velvet leaf. I would allow it plot to germinate then plow it under. Repeat. Repeat repeat for two years except during the cold months when I planted wheat.
It killed the velvet leaf and the Johnson grass.
 
Thread starter #6
I had a plot that became fully taken over by an invasive species called velvet leaf. I would allow it plot to germinate then plow it under. Repeat. Repeat repeat for two years except during the cold months when I planted wheat.
It killed the velvet leaf and the Johnson grass.
thats basically what I did all summer, I’d plow it under every 3 weeks, give or take. I hope I don’t have to plow it as often this next year.
 
Thread starter #7
The goal with the seed I plan to use, is make this an 11 month food plot. I’ll be bush hogging the BFO very early spring and allow the Trophy Banquet to provide a good protein for the summer. Plow it all under in September and replant early October
 

pic217

Senior Member
Don't guess at the lime and fertilizer. Take a soil sample have it tested and apply the lime and fertilizer accordingly. Of all the money you have to spend on food plots the most important 8 dollars is the soil test.
 

DawgDr.

Senior Member
Looks great! What was your spreading method? Hand? Tractor? and did you cultipack as well?

Thanks
 
Plowing isn't going to get rid of any/many weeds. Unless you are trying to establish a clover plot, just let whatever sprouts shoot up, mow in august/sept, spray couple weeks later if you want, then plow and plant a fall mix. Deer eat an awful lot of "weeds" that most food plotters try and eliminate. Your plot looks fine. There is no magical 11 month food plot that you can depend on to grow consistently with a single planting with the climate we have.
 
I have used a mix similar to what pic217 used and have gotten similar results. You could also add medium red clover which comes on as the arrowleaf plays out. With rain it will still be there when you prep for the next planting.
Also I have had good results with throwing Alyce clover into the standing arrowleaf after it has bloomed and set seed. Mow what is in the plot on top of the Alyce clover and it will grow til the frost kills it. Sow it and mow just prior to a rain for best results.
Rinse and repeat for a no till type method.
One advantage of a no till or low till method is that you are not constantly bringing old weeds seed to the surface via your tillage where they can germinate and make even more seeds. Helps with the battle.....
 
Plowing and allowing weeds to germinate then plowing again eliminates all those weed seed that germinated. Repeatedly doing that can eliminate many undesirable seed IMO.
Yep. It's the poor man's way of doing it and tillage has been the go too for weed control long before Roundup was even dreamed about. That being said, Roundup and tillage together will get the job done quicker.
 
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