Fall Food (for thought) Plot Thread2

David and Canuck, I plan on doing the same thing this fall in a couple of my plots. Some minor differences in my plan are my plots are played out fall mixes from last year, that did not get a red clover stand. I will shortly do a throw and mow with buck wheat, let it grow until mid Sep then kill it and repeat the fall mix throw and grow.
I also want to move to a no till strategy if I can.
Let’s compare results later.
 
David and Canuck, I plan on doing the same thing this fall in a couple of my plots. Some minor differences in my plan are my plots are played out fall mixes from last year, that did not get a red clover stand. I will shortly do a throw and mow with buck wheat, let it grow until mid Sep then kill it and repeat the fall mix throw and grow.
I also want to move to a no till strategy if I can.
Let’s compare results later.
Sounds like a plan!!
 
Hey Canuck, I’ve got a throw n mow question for you. If I were to overseed some cereal grain and brassica into some of my perennial clover plots early-mid Sep and then ran over them with a cultipacker or my big drag flipped over, do you think I would get enough seed to soil contact for decent germination? I’m going to try and not break any ground this year if I can help it.
David, what I do is I just broadcast my seed into my clover and flip my drag upside down where it is less aggressive and drag the seed and I have great results. My drag is the kind that is made out of 1/2" cold roll in a diamond pattern and if you flip it over it has 1/2" pieces about 3-4" long that stick down like in a Y pattern. the less aggressive side works great. That's what I do. I have even done winter peas the same way. I do this with my daikon radishes too.
 
David, what I do is I just broadcast my seed into my clover and flip my drag upside down where it is less aggressive and drag the seed and I have great results. My drag is the kind that is made out of 1/2" cold roll in a diamond pattern and if you flip it over it has 1/2" pieces about 3-4" long that stick down like in a Y pattern. the less aggressive side works great. That's what I do. I have even done winter peas the same way. I do this with my daikon radishes too.
That sounds like the exact same drag I’ve got, it’s 2 pieces that are 4x8 making it 8x8 when they are together. I was thinking the non aggressive side like you suggested so it wouldn’t tear up the clover, I think I will definitely give it a try this year, thanks!!
 
Thread starter #608
LOL, mine are old school and haven't used them in a long time. 2 sections, flipped over and pulled behind a 4 wheeler. They can move a lot of trash, LOL.
 

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Thread starter #610
Yes they could. Those were probably, at one time, pulled either just ahead of a cultipacker or pulled behind a grain drill, in both cases, to help cover seed on tilled soil. They are all of 75 years old.
 

2 UP

Senior Member
I have about a 1/2 acre I’m going to plant this Oct in Imperial Whitetail Clover. Would it hinder the clover in getting established if I planted oats first, then smoothed everything over and sowed the clover on top? Only reason for the oats is for the fall attraction. If it’s better long term to plant the clover alone, I’ll do that. Any advice would be appreciated.
 
2 Up, that will work. I would try to do this right in front of a rain if possible. The rain drops will move enough soil particles around to mostly cover the small clover seeds assuring seed to soil contact for germination.
 
Thread starter #614
We're headed in to some hot temperatures right now, but maybe not as hot as years past, but I thought I'd post this chart, to show what excessive soil temperatures can do to the soil. If you have something growing there right now, the soil is a lot cooler, than if you didn't.
 

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Thread starter #617
Wow, I think we got 3/4" yesterday in Talbot County and another 3" predicted over the next 3 days. Feast or famine!
 
I was browsing Welters seed catalog today and saw a new clover offer named Aberlasting. After doing some research on it I thought some of us white clover lovers may be interested in it. It is a hybrid between Caucasian (Kura) clover and white clover, it’s not quite as pricey as durana but certainly not cheap. Here’s a link with some info.
http://www.grasslandoregon.com/assets/aberlasting.pdf
 
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