Fall Food (for thought) Plot Thread2

Crakajak

Senior Member
I've been thinking about this, just trying to figure out how "we" might effectively accomplish this, in a perennial clover plot, without doing too much damage to the clover, but yet optimize our over seeding. I think maybe something like this, with 50% less tines might work. 50% less tines to help keep the "trash" from building up too much. I'm going to keep a look out for one of these (we all need more equipment, right?) and maybe play around with it.

You want to try using my landscape rake and turning it around backwards come and get it. It think it would work.I planted last weekend.
 
Thread starter #643
I got my soil test results back and it showed that I was a little low in Potassium, which I will adjust, at some point next year. Since I'm not harvesting a crop and hauling it away, I get less worried about it, however, maybe I should?

Good potassium levels help with protein production, which is what I want, plus it helps with the plant to deal with heat and drought conditions. Hmmmmmmmm

http://extension.uga.edu/content/da...am Newsletter Volume 4-Issue 1 March 2016.pdf

Potassium.JPG
 
Here are some pics of my pine needle rake, its 6 ft long. Also a pic showing before and after running the rake across a Durana plot that I just overseeded and fertilized. This is my solution to improving seed-t Rake1.jpg Rake1.jpg Rake2.jpg Rake3.jpg o-soil contact when I over seed. I also use this rake to cover seeds in plots that have been well harrowed after fertilization. Provide a nice smooth bed and lightly covers most of the seeds.
 
Here are some pics of my pine needle rake, its 6 ft long. Also a pic showing before and after running the rake across a Durana plot that I just overseeded and fertilized. This is my solution to improving seed-t View attachment 944172 View attachment 944172 View attachment 944173 View attachment 944174 o-soil contact when I over seed. I also use this rake to cover seeds in plots that have been well harrowed after fertilization. Provide a nice smooth bed and lightly covers most of the seeds.
George, that rake looks like it does a great job in the clover, it disturbs the clover just enough but doesn’t do any harm to it!!
 
Thread starter #650
So, my food plots enjoyed a nice 2 3/4" of rain, from "Michael" and the oats and soybeans are up and just waiting on the clovers, radishes and turnips to start doing their stuff. A nice cool front is coming thru, so we should be good to go!

I started thinking about oats in general and Buck Forage Oats, in particular. I found out that Buck Forage Oats really started out, as a variety of Coker oats. Coker 833 is what they were originally labeled in the late '90's.

http://www.lsuagcenter.com/profiles/lbenedict/articles/page1520524017934

Their claim to fame is that they stay tender, sweeter and green longer than most other oat varieties. This is typical of most forage variety of oats, but maybe BFO just does it a little better(?). I have not used any "other" forage oats and most of the time, it's just plain Coker oats, that I plant.

So, I wondered what work UGA has done for forage oats, specifically for Georgia, and specifically for wildlife, so I emailed Dr. Dennis Hancock and he gave some guidance on work that was already done. I'm not sure what all this means for me, but I found it interesting. I'm not sure what the prices are for these seed varieties or where I can get them easily, but it all has me thinking .... Not sure if they are any better than BFO or not, but I'd like to compare, one day.

https://site.extension.uga.edu/forageteam/2018/09/cool-season-wildlife-food-plots/

http://georgiaforages.caes.uga.edu/species-and-varieties/cool-season/oat.html

Forage Grain Recommendations for Georgia.JPG
 
Thread starter #651
Just for my own reference, it looks like Horizon 306 oat seed might be the most preferred option to consider for Georgia, wildlife. It will be a treated seed, since it is sold to farmers and sells in the ball park of $20 - $21 per bag. I think it might be a good option to do some comparisons on, next fall. Something for me to think about.
 
Thread starter #652

Canuck5

Senior Member
A few interesting things in here ..... "More mature bucks in your herd will stabilize the social system, compress the breeding season and move it earlier in the year." Less late born fawns giving them a greater chance of survival.

 
Great vide
A few interesting things in here ..... "More mature bucks in your herd will stabilize the social system, compress the breeding season and move it earlier in the year." Less late born fawns giving them a greater chance of survival.

Great video, that would be interesting work! I wonder if the bucks get laughed at with their shaved belt?! 🤣
 
Thread starter #656
Just some more things to ponder, with overseeding. The tire drag, that he made, with the chains, seems to ruff the soil up pretty well! (Funny looking deer in this video, tho)

 
Top