FFL/Gun Law Question

Capt Quirk

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
It was my understanding, of something I heard from a few individuals in the Holster Community, that I can not accept a Firearm from a client in order to use it as a holster mold. I would need to have a FFL license to do so legally. From what I read on the FFL site, it is meant for the manufacture or importing of firearms, which I'm not doing either. I am not purchasing nor selling firearms. Maybe any Gunsmiths could answer this?
 
#2
In most states, you can loan/borrow firearms, no problem

Some commie states require a BGC for this activity. I am pretty sure Georgia does NOT require these checks to borrow, loan, or do private sales.

Interstate may be different, for pistols. Crossing a state line, does weird things.
 

Capt Quirk

Senior Member
Thread starter #4
@trial&error- Usually, just local drop off and pick up... or pick up and drop off. But there has been one fella in a different state, and I would have needed his pistol, just because it was a different set up. That never happened, but still, I'd like to know.
 
#6
Not sure on receiving a firearm in the mail without a FFL, but as long as you aren't prohibited from posessing a firearm you can use your customers firearms with their consent.
 
#7
If you are not an FFL you cannon receive handguns in the mail from out of state or in state.
You can loan or borrow handguns anytime to use as a holster pattern as long as state lines are not crossed.
 
#8
You can loan or borrow handguns anytime to use as a holster pattern as long as state lines are not crossed.
Whats the deal with that? Why would it be illegal to cross state lines with a pistol?
 
#10
Federal law prohibits transfers across state lines without an ffl.
I don't think were talking about transfer of ownership or buying a pistol out of state.

My question is why would it be illegal to cross state lines with a pistol that you were legally in posession of.
 
#11
The op was talking in one of his examples, that an out of state client was going to need to provide a pistol. Check the first post, and one several down. EDIT: posts 1 and 4 with 4 specifically saying from an Out of state client.

That was the op discussion. That would be a transfer, even if it were to be returned. The op stated he isn't an ffl.

You can take your pistol with you across state lines as long as you don't transfer ownership while there. And you're not going to NJ CA HI and several other of the more communist states.

I don't think were talking about transfer of ownership or buying a pistol out of state.

My question is why would it be illegal to cross state lines with a pistol that you were legally in posession of.
 
#12
No one has been charged with illegal ownership, they are charged with illegal possession.

Mail requires an FFL. Drop off and pickup I wouldn't imagine requires anything more than a private sale of a gun would. Can the person legally possess a gun. If you do leather work and you are a convicted felon, then holsters should probably be avoided. I never filled out a form with a gunsmith. If this is more than a hobby I would consult an actual lawyer.
 
#13
The op was talking in one of his examples, that an out of state client was going to need to provide a pistol. Check the first post, and one several down. EDIT: posts 1 and 4 with 4 specifically saying from an Out of state client.

That was the op discussion. That would be a transfer, even if it were to be returned. The op stated he isn't an ffl.

You can take your pistol with you across state lines as long as you don't transfer ownership while there. And you're not going to NJ CA HI and several other of the more communist states.
Right.

My original question wasn't about transfering or shipping the gun out of state to an individual. It was about traveling with a handgun across state lines, as I quoted from frankwright. He may have been referring to mail only, which would make his second comment correct.


Also, reading on the ATF's site, it seems "unlicensed persons" can ship and receive firearms in the mail as long as it is within the same state. When state lines are crossed via mail, thats when FFL's become a requirement. At least that was my interpretation.

https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/docs/0813-firearms-top-12-qaspdf/download
 
Thread starter #14
My holsters are nice, but not nice enough to cross state lines to get one. I have been told that if a pistol had the cylinder or firing pin removed, it was ok to mail, or maybe UPS.
 
#15
My holsters are nice, but not nice enough to cross state lines to get one. I have been told that if a pistol had the cylinder or firing pin removed, it was ok to mail, or maybe UPS.
Thats also incorrect. The serialized part of the firearm, usually the frame on a handgun, is the firearm. You can ship everything but that serialized part across state lines to unlicensed persons.
 

jmoser

Senior Member
#17
Gunsmiths require FFL to work on serialized components even without interstate shipment. Even just engraving:

Is a license needed to engage in the business of engraving, customizing, refinishing or repairing firearms?

Yes. A person conducting such activities as a business is considered to be a gunsmith within the definition of a dealer.


[18 U.S.C. 921(a)(11) and (21); 27 CFR 478.11]
 

Miguel Cervantes

GON Severe Weatherman
#20
I know them, and do order holster dummy guns. But, they run about $50 and up. Not really a problem. BUT, when you have a pistol with a unique setup, such as a scoped SBH, an exact dummy is unlikely. This is where having access to certain pistols helps. It keeps cost down, which is passed on to the customer. It guarantees an exact fit.
:cool::cool::cool:
 
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