Fishing Ponds this time of year?

Thread starter #1
Hey Guys,
I am a college student so I don't get to fish much and I have never fished this time of year. Because of time constraints I usually end up fishing in ponds or electric only lakes. What kind of advice would you give me for catching some large mouth this time of year in small bodies of water? Like I said, I have never fished in the fall or winter; I have read many things about it though. I havn't had time to get out lately but I assume that things should be fairly tough right now? I live in Marietta and I often fish in Lake Acworth and many local ponds as well as the Chattahooche on occasion. Any help will be greatly appreciated as the semester will be over soon and I will finally have some time to fish!
 

SWAMPFOX

Senior Member
#2
Plastic worm, grape firetail, fish deep and slow, use as little weight as possible. That's what I been doing. Or live shiners under a cork bobber.
 

Randall

Senior Member
#3
Small Lakes

If I was fishing Lake Acworth I would use a tiny fluke on a dropshot rig or a jig and pig. A rattle trap might be good also for some shallow fish. The jig would be my first choice since you are more likely to get a real HAWG on it. But, its hard to beat the dropshot for numbers of smaller fish in winter.
 

DDD

GON Winter Weatherman
#4
I have had good luck with a fire tiger rattle trap in farm ponds in the winter. I have absolutely no clue why, but I have. 3 years ago I was fishing on Christmas eve and I caught 2 8lbs.ers out of a farm pond both on the fire tiger rattle trap. I would also say to use a creepy crawler or a jig and pig. A jig and pig is a good cold weather bait, it is slow, on the bottom and you can usually tell if you have a fish or not.

Hope this helps. :)
 
#5
A big white rooster tail has always been the ticket for me. Reel it just fast enough to keep the blade turning. Most N. GA farm ponds are stained to muddy this time of year, so the vibration of the blade helps. You could try a Colorado blade spinnerbait for larger fish, but I'm a numbers man. Good luck.

OB
 
Thread starter #6
Thanks!

Thanks for the info! How do you recommend working the drop shot? I know it takes some time to get the feel of it but I am not sure really what to do? I have read different things but most often I have heard to keep the rod tip low and sweep it along slowly. Is this what you guys do? Thanks again!
 

Randall

Senior Member
#7
Dropshot

Theres a bunch of ways to work a dropshot. You can just drag it along slowly but thats not the way I catch most of my fish on it. I catch most of my fish on it two ways. First I just shake it in place on slack line so the bait (not the sinker) is shaking up off the bottom. The second way is to tighten up the line and pull the bait (not the sinker) up off the bottom and then give it slack and let the bait fall back to the bottom. You can also mix these two ways of working the dropshot together and shake it and let it fall, shake it and let it fall. What makes the dropshot work so well is the fact that the weight sits on the bottom in one place as you work it keeping the bait in the face of the fish until it strikes. I have also caught fish swimming it, dragging it, and just holding the bait up off the bottom and doing nothing. I find new ways to use it all the time. Triton Mike who posts here some wrote a good article on dropshoting. You can read it at www.tritonmike.com/flattail.html . Its a very good detailed article on the subject.
 
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