For you hunters 55 and older

shdw633

Senior Member
Getting both of my knees replaced this year. First one should be within the next month followed by the second one about 3 months later. I am a little nervous about next seasons hunting. Hoping to still be able to use a climber and climb a ladder into a box stand. Actually not a little nervous, I am a whole lot nervous!! Plus I want to be able to hunt Illinois and Michigan and both those locations require a lot of leg work to have a good hunt.
 

Hooty Hoot

Gone but not forgotten
My left shoulder feels as though it is made from spare parts. I purchased a new shotgun a few days ago in the hopes of reducing some of the recoil I was experiencing with my 1300. I'm just not as tough as I once was. I also have cataracts but not bad enough just yet. Aches and pains come and go. Hips bothered me this year and I lost sight in my right eye several years ago. I can pick up movement better with one eye than I ever could with two so it ain't all bad. Like someone else said; Getting old ain't for sissies.
 
Thread starter #287

Milkman

Retired Moderator
Got a grandson be 2 in April just want to be able take him hunting and fishing a little his dad not going to do it
You are in for one of life’s greatest gifts There is something special about hunting and fishing with the grandkids.

My oldest is about to turn 15 and is getting bigger bucks than me or his dad now. But he had some good training.
 

Jim Boyd

Senior Member
I am still a youngster (62) and I know the day will come but it ain’t right now.

I am more cautious these days but 12 hours at 20 feet in 20-30 degree temps is still fine with me.

One day I may even give up the bow and go back to a centerfire but that ain’t right now either.


Old guys rule! (hope I still feel like that when I get old)
 
I'm 66 now and things are wearing on me. I had my left knee replaced several years ago and it turned out great. A couple of years later the left hip got replaced and it turned out not so great. Better than it was but still in constant pain.
The right knee is gone, to the point something will have to be done shortly.
I have spinal stenosis and 3 years ago they said it need operating on right away. I've toughed it out so far but it's getting tougher than me now.
I have deteriorating joint disease in both shoulders. It's been bothering me for years but now it's getting critical. Worst thing about the shoulders is it's affecting my shooting in negative ways.
I'm missing a disc in my upper neck from high school football. But it doesn't bother me much anymore.
Just before deer season I was diagnosed with diabetes. I had no idea how this would effect me or how I'd know it but I learned some things. When my sugar gets too low my eyesight gets real blurry and my brain goes on the blitz. I had a couple of bucks chase a doe right by me, and saw what I was sure was a couple of good bucks but couldn't see well enough to know for sure and couldn't raise my rifle to shoot them when I wanted to. At least the fix for this was easy. 3 sugar packs will get me back to normal. I carry peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and poptarts when I go deer hunting.
I don't get as much done as I used to but somethings must be done daily. I have 6 Arabian horses to care for. Worse I have a stallion. A stud horse changes the dynamics of daily life a great deal.
All this is hard on me. I used to be very active. I taught Tae Kwon Do and was a serious practitioner also. Ran 8 to 12 miles a day. I bench pressed 315 pounds twice when I was 55.
Now I'm just a shadow of that person and the future is not bright.
Some of us are fortunate that we can get into advanced age and still climb to the top of the mountain.
Some of us can hardly get out the door.
 

MYRX

Senior Member
What I have noticed, (I am just about to turn 65) is that I am really run down after the deer season. Almost like an old buck...LOL I need recovery time or I get a flu. I push myself hard Bow season into December, then the endurance just runs out. I thank the Lord I can still use a climber, see, walk without pain. I have noticed a loss of strength, which means I have to ask for help now to relocate stands. I can't stay up past 9:30PM if I plan to have a good hunt the next AM. Overall, each day in the woods is more special. I don't have siblings that hunt, and no grandchildren to teach which is sad for me. (I spent much time talking my sons to the woods and even out west but they choose to walk away from hunting, golf is their life).
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I'm 66 now and things are wearing on me. I had my left knee replaced several years ago and it turned out great. A couple of years later the left hip got replaced and it turned out not so great. Better than it was but still in constant pain.
The right knee is gone, to the point something will have to be done shortly.
I have spinal stenosis and 3 years ago they said it need operating on right away. I've toughed it out so far but it's getting tougher than me now.
I have deteriorating joint disease in both shoulders. It's been bothering me for years but now it's getting critical. Worst thing about the shoulders is it's affecting my shooting in negative ways.
I'm missing a disc in my upper neck from high school football. But it doesn't bother me much anymore.
Just before deer season I was diagnosed with diabetes. I had no idea how this would effect me or how I'd know it but I learned some things. When my sugar gets too low my eyesight gets real blurry and my brain goes on the blitz. I had a couple of bucks chase a doe right by me, and saw what I was sure was a couple of good bucks but couldn't see well enough to know for sure and couldn't raise my rifle to shoot them when I wanted to. At least the fix for this was easy. 3 sugar packs will get me back to normal. I carry peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and poptarts when I go deer hunting.
I don't get as much done as I used to but somethings must be done daily. I have 6 Arabian horses to care for. Worse I have a stallion. A stud horse changes the dynamics of daily life a great deal.
All this is hard on me. I used to be very active. I taught Tae Kwon Do and was a serious practitioner also. Ran 8 to 12 miles a day. I bench pressed 315 pounds twice when I was 55.
Now I'm just a shadow of that person and the future is not bright.
Some of us are fortunate that we can get into advanced age and still climb to the top of the mountain.
Some of us can hardly get out the door.

I commend you and tip my hat to a man with courage and strong heart. :cheers:
 
Thread starter #295

Milkman

Retired Moderator
Any of you young men near Milkman and me we need to hit Pot Luck for breakfast early one morning and have a biscuit and share some stories.
Great idea.

Gentlemen
The place Miguel mentions is a popular breakfast restaurant in Monroe Ga. Walton county. That’s about 20 miles west of Athens and 30 miles east of Stone Mountain.

Maybe we could pick a Saturday morning before the 🦌 season gets here.
Ok
We never got this off the ground last fall. Does anyone want to do a breakfast get together in Monroe Ga this late winter/ early spring?

Tagging a few local members

@Miguel Cervantes
@01Foreman400
@Arrow Flinger
@Hoss
@MYRX
@Big7
@Cook&Bro
@DeucesWild
@whitedog
@Jody Hawk
@Mechanicaldawg
 
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We are all on a big ship - on a cruise across the world and in spite of the danger of being swept away at any time or perhaps because of the danger one is not allowed to be depressed or unhappy. The way the world works which is badly - leaves a strong incentive to live purposefully and to be determined about living well. There are no happy endings. Death is horrible, final and frequently premature so an unhappy ending does not undermine a rich and energetic life
 

oldguy

Senior Member
Old Shakespear said it best:
Cowards die many times before their death.
Of all the wonders I yet have seen it seems to me most strange
that men should fear, seeing that death a necessary end
will come when it will come.
 
We are all on a big ship - on a cruise across the world and in spite of the danger of being swept away at any time or perhaps because of the danger one is not allowed to be depressed or unhappy. The way the world works which is badly - leaves a strong incentive to live purposefully and to be determined about living well. There are no happy endings. Death is horrible, final and frequently premature so an unhappy ending does not undermine a rich and energetic life
Old Shakespear said it best:
Cowards die many times before their death.
Of all the wonders I yet have seen it seems to me most strange
that men should fear, seeing that death a necessary end
will come when it will come.
Dangit boys!!!

Y'all gonna talk all day or y'all gonna come eat breakfast?
 
I still have one more year before i turn 55, so i will post a comment then. :). My dad will turn 80 this year and still loves to hunt as much as i do. He wont do any over night trips anymore because he likes his on bed to good he says. I am so thankful to have him around and healthy even though he has slowed down a lot these days. He says all he needs to kill a deer is his old browning auto 308 and a pack of Red Man Chew.
 
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