Front slab porch-ground settling leaving huge gap!

standing seam roof too..... I like it
 

olered

Senior Member
I'm thinking there is a downspout at the left front corner of the home and then a little eyebrow roof at the left front corner of the garage with a downspout and the gutters are overflowing. Also check that inside corner seam for drips too in the gutter.
 

rospaw

Senior Member
I'm thinking there is a downspout at the left front corner of the home and then a little eyebrow roof at the left front corner of the garage with a downspout and the gutters are overflowing. Also check that inside corner seam for drips too in the gutter.
The pic makes it look like the gutter is low/bent right in front of the F door. ???
 
thanks for all the replies guys. Here are a couple pics...one is the porch and then a close up of the space that has evolved due to the dirt settling under it. When they built my house they basically buried everything and then built my house on top of it.
The gap you see goes all the way around the slab.
The pic says a lot, as it appears you have some potentially serious settlement around your slab grade. As mentioned it’s very illegal to have a bury pit onsite much less under the home. A company here in Metro Atlanta may be able to help by injecting those areas with dirt, it’s called mud jack I think.
Get a pro to look at it, you may need immediate attention before it gets worse.
 

dwhee87

Senior Member
Do you get standing water on the porch in a rain? Porch should be sloped away from the house slightly so water will run off, instead of lay against house.

I had a similar issue 20 years ago and used Ram Jack. They did a great job and it not only fixed my front porch, but eliminated a leak in my basement at the same time. My porch was about twice that long and it was $1800 (I know, 20 years ago), and they were done in about 4 hours.
 

olered

Senior Member
The one thing about mud jacking is you are adding more weight over the top of the area. If the settlement is done then that's no problem and it will support the extra weight if not it could happen again just make sure they give you a warranty. They may recommend the foam injection under the area, but I would be hesitant about that since termites love foam especially right against the house . If you have a termite warranty consult with them before using the foam.
 

Hooty Hoot

Senior Member
That is just a poor way of doing something. If it was poured on fill, it should have had a turn-down footing on the front. The right side and rear is probably resting on a footing and the whole thing seems to be poured to thin. It is not a huge problem though. Before I spent money putting a band aid on it, I would just tear it out and do it right. You could also buy a couple of pier forms at home depot, dig out several places on the front and fill with concrete.
 
Thread starter #28

LCT

Senior Member
Guys! Thank you so much for the replies!! I thought a picture might help. I always assumed it was the dirt under the porch settling but now I'm not sure if its not erosion. The thing is if it is erosion where is the dirt going?
Thanks for the compliments on the house...its my first one. Needs some TLC on the paint for sure and that is coming as soon as I can get the funds. They didnt use the the best paint and its coming off around the windows...looks like crap.
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
Cause might be the gutters are hung to low to catch all the runoff in a hard rain.Seen that a bunch over the years also.Put a water hose that is full open on the roof and let it run in one spot for a minute or so.That will tell you if gutters need adjusting.
 

GA native

Senior Member
More than likely, the builder didn't bury anything. The grading contractor just did a poor job compacting the backfill. If settling is the issue. Which I doubt. It is likely just the mud washed out during heavy rains.

The next hard rain we have, you need to stand out there and watch. Watch for where the water is coming from. My guess is as good as everyone else's, clogged gutters. Which you can check today.

The fix depends on how much soil was lost. After you have corrected the gutter issue.

If it is just the front edge that's floating, I would buy six bags, or so, of sakrete, and pack it under the slab dry. Then replace the dirt, and give it a positive drain away from the concrete.
 

jimbo4116

Retired Moderator
More than likely, the builder didn't bury anything. The grading contractor just did a poor job compacting the backfill. If settling is the issue. Which I doubt. It is likely just the mud washed out during heavy rains.

The next hard rain we have, you need to stand out there and watch. Watch for where the water is coming from. My guess is as good as everyone else's, clogged gutters. Which you can check today.

The fix depends on how much soil was lost. After you have corrected the gutter issue.

If it is just the front edge that's floating, I would buy six bags, or so, of sakrete, and pack it under the slab dry. Then replace the dirt, and give it a positive drain away from the concrete.
Hard to pack dry sakrete. Mix it to a grout consistency. Then pack it in with a trowel one bags at a time. Under cut the slab 4 to 6 inches. Pack in the grout then use a 2x6 and pin against the grout till it sets. Then you can back fill some soil.

Had to do this to my dog pen slab. Been doing a little at the time. Will post some pictures when I get home.

Learn as you go process. Had to put a catch basin and run a drain pipe to handle the runoff that was running under slab. You can see how I am undercutting the slab to be able to get grout under the slab.
You could run your arm under the slab on the right. Not pretty, but plan on back filling with soil and re-sodding.
 

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IIICrkRepr

Senior Member
I have a pool deck doing the same thing on a corner due to wash out, had a crew come out to quote using polylevel. It can lift an entire slab up if need be. Quote came in at $5k
 
A company I see advertising uses foam to fill and lift. I can't remember which company
 

DannyW

Senior Member
I had a similar issue last year. Water washed out one end of a porch slab and finally the sheer weight of the washed out end caused the slab to crack and buckle in the middle.

The contractor cut the slab just past the break, drilled holes in the cut end of the remaining slab, and inserted rebar to tie the old and new pieces together. Then, and this is the key, he repoured the new section with a footing.

I just measured the repair and it's 12'x14'. My cost was $3,500 just to give you an idea of the cost. It took them 3 days...day one they cut and busted up the old slab, day two they hauled off the busted up concrete and built the forms, and day 3 they poured it.

Big pieces of concrete need footings, but builders tend to take the cheap and easy route.

The only issue with a repair versus a full replacement is the concrete color does not match, and there is a small seam at the point of the break. But I plan to lay rock over it at some point so that is a non-issue for me.
 
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