Gas Forge

getaff

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
Looking to make the jump and get a forge. What would be a good starting forge? Is there anywhere to find a good used forge. Thanks in Advance
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
#2
Lot depends on what you plan to forge, your current work space, work piece dimensions, how much you plan to use it, etc. Lots of variables to consider.
Although daunting at first glance it is very simple to make one from scrap materials if you are so inclined. Plenty of different approaches on line to look at and tutorials that will overwhelm you. Pick something simple and stick to the plan.
If you want to see several different styles of gas forges you are welcome to come on up to my Trackrock Hammer-in (see separate thread in this section) the end of this month and watch them in operation - probably be around 15 different set-ups. This can give you a better idea of what can be done with what in a face to face and maybe even hands-on environment.

And sometimes, yes, you can find a decent used forge for sale. Jerry Costen, Flint River Knife Club President (google or facebook) had one of my simple single burners for sale. Might check with him, he's down in Conyers area. Would be very beneficial for you to visit their next club meeting, several good bladesmiths in the group and most are also members of the Georgia Custom Knifemakers' Guild as well. Lots of good demos, technical info, resources, etc. to net work with in both organizations.
 
#3
I built mine with some/a lot of advice from Carl, and some YouTube videos. I built it out of an A/C freon can. It works fine so far with no issues. It was easier than expected.
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
#5
Makes a few things a little easier, but all can be done with nuts, bolts, saw, drill, and a little mechanical thinking.
The torches I make require no welding and are made from simple plumbing supplies. They are venturi type torches that do not require forced air supply and yes they get things hot enough to forge weld if wanted.
This is applied science/physics so certain ratio's need to be followed for good performance. However, you don't have to do all the calculation work - just follow simple protocalls and avoid making any changes until you get the first one up and working properly.
I used to have a short tutorial on building these, but seem to have lost the file. Will keep looking.
 
#6
I did minimal welding to build mine. I actually bought my torch, but I'll definitely try to make my next one. I was a little intimidated with the thought of making a torch, but after taking mine apart there's really not much to it.
 

sea trout

Senior Member
#7
If you want to buy a new one in middle Ga the hoof house in Social Circle has them. They probably have, or can find you a used one if you want.
 

getaff

Senior Member
Thread starter #8
I did minimal welding to build mine. I actually bought my torch, but I'll definitely try to make my next one. I was a little intimidated with the thought of making a torch, but after taking mine apart there's really not much to it.
That is what is getting me as well. Where are you at little south of atl
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
#9
A little junkpile scrounging and $10 to $20 spent at HD, Lowes, or Ace and you have the materials to make two torches. The rest is drilling holes, tapping a few of them, mashing some 1/4" soft copper tubing around a .30" drill bit. and fitting things together. More expensive parts are the needle valves, ball valve shut-off, regulator and proper flex hose and couplings - all Lp (gas) rated. All this stuff can be obtained locally with a bit of looking.
Really is simple doings once you understand what is needed and understand how it works.
 
#12
I love it! Better check with Miss Lilly, it's her forge. She just lets her Dad use it sometimes.

ps - She's better with a hammer....
 
#13
Just send me a PM and we can arrange a time. Carl is right. Lily is the boss. lol
 
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