Getting Griffin Odyssey Spider Vise for Christmas

People that have the Griffin Odyssey Spider. Do you use the clamp that came with the vise to secure it to a table or did you buy a stand to use with it?
I use the clamp, but I've been threatening to order me a pedestal base.
 
Been using it any?
 
Thread starter #44

Yes using it a little bit. Have not tied anything in a while with it. Last thing was the peacock hurl fly that I posted on here. Need some new materials. I have it set up on the side of a desk. The top opens where I can put my fly tying materials which is nice also. Still very green to fly tying. Youtube helps out a lot.
 

gobbleinwoods

Daily Driveler News Team
Yes using it a little bit. Have not tied anything in a while with it. Last thing was the peacock hurl fly that I posted on here. Need some new materials. I have it set up on the side of a desk. The top opens where I can put my fly tying materials which is nice also. Still very green to fly tying. Youtube helps out a lot.
What do you need I might be able to spare some more.
 
Thread starter #46
What do you need I might be able to spare some more.
It is okay gobble. I am just saying I need to buy specific materials for certain flies. I still think I might buy the dry flies. They look difficult to tie. I used your materials for the peacock hurl flies. I do thank you for the materials though.

Don't you have the same vise?
 

gobbleinwoods

Daily Driveler News Team
It is okay gobble. I am just saying I need to buy specific materials for certain flies. I still think I might buy the dry flies. They look difficult to tie. I used your materials for the peacock hurl flies. I do thank you for the materials though.

Don't you have the same vise?
Yes I have that vise. Dry flies are not that hard so give it a go.
 
Does anyone sell pre-packaged materials to tie specific flies such as BWO's or Wooly Buggers? I'm new to this and am trying to start tying a few of my own but it's pretty overwhelming trying to pick out everything you might need. These are the only thing I've tied so far. :)
 

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gobbleinwoods

Daily Driveler News Team
Does anyone sell pre-packaged materials to tie specific flies such as BWO's or Wooly Buggers? I'm new to this and am trying to start tying a few of my own but it's pretty overwhelming trying to pick out everything you might need. These are the only thing I've tied so far. :)

Not that I have ever seen. It would be hard to do IMO with hair, feather parts, etc unless you somehow sold enough to make a large/small batch of the same fly.
 
Woolly Boogers are cheap and easy. All you need is some chenille, strung saddle hackles, marabou, and maybe some crystal flash or cone heads.

For BWO dry flies, you will need pretty much just good blue dun hackle and olive dubbing.
 
My recommendation for a good basic starter kit of tools and materials you will need to get started tying a variety of productive fly patterns (trout: )

Good scissors. And some other scissors to cut coarser stuff.

A bobbin or two.

6/0 tying thread in basic colors such as black, light yellow, orange, and red.
A selection of dry fly, 3x long curved dryfly/nymph, and curved short nymph hooks in sizes #10-#16. Add in some long shank streamer hooks in #6-#10.

A selection of dubbing material. Hareline fur dubbing is perfect for nymphs and many dry files. Superfine dubbing and UV ice dub come in handy, also. The most used colors are pale yellow, tan, rusty orange, and gray. You can also blend the fur dubbing to make unique colors. You can get dubbing kits that have a bunch of different colors, also.

Some ultra chenille in yellow, chartreuse, pink, red, olive, black, and tan. Vareigated chenille is good for Wooly Buggers and larger nymphs like Girdle Bugs.

Good dry fly hackle. Don't skimp. Metz or Whiting are the best I've used. Brown and grizzly and ginger will fill most of your needs, maybe some blue dun. Get 1/2 necks or the Whiting 100 packs. Yes, it's expensive. No, you can't do without it.

Strung saddle hackle for Wooly Buggers and other streamers and nymphs. Brown, grizzly, olive, and black will be the most used colors.

Marabou in white, black, tan, olive, and yellow.

Ringneck pheasant tail feathers.

Turkey tail feathers.

Goose biots in brown, white, and yellow.

Mallard flank and partridge feathers.

Golden pheasant tippets.

Lead wire in .10-.30

Gold wire, medium size will do for a lot of fly patterns.

Tungsten beads in 1/8", 7/64" in gold, copper, silver, and black nickel.

Cone heads in Silver and copper.

Lead dumbbell eyes.

White calftail.

Deer and elk hair patches.

Head cement and Loctite gel superglue.

A bodkin.

Yes, if you run out and buy all this at once, it will cost you. But, this is a good basic kit of tools and materials that will set you up to tie a large variety of fly patterns for a good while, and you can add more stuff as you need it for other patterns.

If you want to start with just the basic essentials, get the tools and thread and hooks, grizzly and brown dry fly hackle, strung saddle hackle, chenille, peacock herl, and light yellow, gray, and tan dubbing.

Some good starter patterns that I would recommend to tie that are fairly easy, will teach you most of the basic techniques, and will almost always catch fish:

Dry flies-Adams, Yellow Palmer, Elkhair Caddis in sizes #12 and #14.

Woolly Buggers olive and black, in #8 and #10. My favorite Woolly Bugger around here, I tie in #8 with a copper conehead, olive and yellow marabou with a couple strands of crystal flash, vareigated olive/black chenille, and grizzly hackle.

Nymphs: Tellico, Hare's Ear, Green Weenie, and Prince in sizes #12 and #14. Pheasant tails in #14-#16.
 
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