heater body suit VS Iwom suit … Pros and cons

Wore a heater body suit once, 12 degrees 15 mph wind and it worked well. For sure wouldn't need this in the Ga woods..
Used this method with my son when he was 9-10 and couldn't keep warm on Georgia's frigid 30 degree mornings.:)
It worked for us...
Lol.... you don't hunt up in the mountains. I have sat in my HBS in the single digits on quite a few mornings here in Georgia. I loved mine except it was a tad bit to small for my 6'2" frame so I sold it and am looking at a new one or a IWOM. I sat in 10 degree weather and driving snow with 25-45mph winds up in Iowa this past November and without a doubt there is no way I could have done it without it.
 

Hunter922

Senior Member
Lol.... you don't hunt up in the mountains. I have sat in my HBS in the single digits on quite a few mornings here in Georgia. I loved mine except it was a tad bit to small for my 6'2" frame so I sold it and am looking at a new one or a IWOM. I sat in 10 degree weather and driving snow with 25-45mph winds up in Iowa this past November and without a doubt there is no way I could have done it without it.
No I don't.. I hunt Cobb and Fulton.. and Missouri..
 
When I sailed a lot, I spent many a night on deck in below zero temps and windy conditions. I have used "heater" suits, chemical warmers, and all the tricks available by 2010 (the last time I sailed freezing waters). I wasn't really happy with any of them.

Personal preference is simply layers! I start with raw silk long johns, silk socks, silk gloves and a good silk baklava.

Second layer, is either loose weave wool or one of the thermo designed plastics (several of them are very good).

Over that I either wear an oversized 7mm neoprene suit, or "breathable" pants and shirt. I wear winter grade boot socks, lightweight driving gloves and a heavy ski-mask either thermo plastic or neoprene.

The 4th layer is always water resistant outerwear with reinforced patches. Heavy waterproof gloves are a must, along with a third pair of socks (light weight - no cotton), and a wool scarf complete the layer.

In extreme conditions I add a heavy weather coat with a hood and big mittens.

When properly layered, I have never been cold. The only issue I ever encounter is sweat! Silk and the other wicking layers keep most of the sweat off my body, but the outer layers tend to absorb the sweat, and after a day or two the heavy gear tends to smell a bit ripe!

Understand, I am not talking about being comfortable for an hour or two. properly layered, I could and sometimes did, stay warm in extreme conditions for days!

I have holed up in a tree blind, with Northern Illinois temps of 10 to 12 degrees and 12 knot winds, wearing just three layers and was mostly comfortable even after 5 hours.
 
When I sailed a lot, I spent many a night on deck in below zero temps and windy conditions. I have used "heater" suits, chemical warmers, and all the tricks available by 2010 (the last time I sailed freezing waters). I wasn't really happy with any of them.

Personal preference is simply layers! I start with raw silk long johns, silk socks, silk gloves and a good silk baklava.

Second layer, is either loose weave wool or one of the thermo designed plastics (several of them are very good).

Over that I either wear an oversized 7mm neoprene suit, or "breathable" pants and shirt. I wear winter grade boot socks, lightweight driving gloves and a heavy ski-mask either thermo plastic or neoprene.

The 4th layer is always water resistant outerwear with reinforced patches. Heavy waterproof gloves are a must, along with a third pair of socks (light weight - no cotton), and a wool scarf complete the layer.

In extreme conditions I add a heavy weather coat with a hood and big mittens.

When properly layered, I have never been cold. The only issue I ever encounter is sweat! Silk and the other wicking layers keep most of the sweat off my body, but the outer layers tend to absorb the sweat, and after a day or two the heavy gear tends to smell a bit ripe!

Understand, I am not talking about being comfortable for an hour or two. properly layered, I could and sometimes did, stay warm in extreme conditions for days!

I have holed up in a tree blind, with Northern Illinois temps of 10 to 12 degrees and 12 knot winds, wearing just three layers and was mostly comfortable even after 5 hours.
Over the many years in the woods I've always layered up but never have thought much of how or what with other than my socks and core area. I make sure my boots are loose until I have silk socks then two more layers wick away thermal. Plus a good head/ ears cover. I've always heard core area warmth will help keep the rest of you warm. Seems to be true for me
 
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