Hipsters, the next generation of hunters.

I see more young hunters down far South here than ever before.
They all seem to tote AR,s and look at you thru their scopes while they wander around..
I tote a 7.62x39 AR pretty often nowadays when I'm hunting in the thick woods. I don't look through my scope at you, though, unless you look pretty sketchy or you're on my land and ain't supposed to be. :)
 

gma1320

Senior Member
I actually helped get a hipster that I work with get started deer hunting. The organic free-range meat sealed the deal. He asked ten million questions and spent a year or two learning, but he's killed a couple deer now on hard-hunted public mountain land. He's a pretty good guy, even if he does lean a bit to the Bernie side.

My favorite part was the first time he saw a legal buck in the woods, and he tried to shoot it.

He said, "I had the strangest thing happen. I saw this buck coming, so I slowly got my gun up and got ready to shoot. When I got my sights on it, my heart rate cranked up really fast, and I started shaking really badly. I couldn't hold steady on it. I tried to shoot it, but I completely missed the whole deer! I don't know what in the world happened to me, and I don't understand it! I've never experienced a loss of control like that before?"
That sir is purdy awesome
 
In general usage by 99% of us, a "yearling" is a fall fawn deer born that year. Out of spots, but not full-sized. A deer of the year, a yearling. You can say all you want about how a yearling is a year and a half old deer, but pretty much nobody uses the term that way, and when anybody says "yearling," everybody knows what they mean. A 1 1/2 year old deer is just a "deer." Kind of like the folks in the gun forum who chastise people for saying "clip," but everybody on God's green earth knows exactly what you mean, whether you say "clip" or "magazine."
I disagree.

Everyone I hunt with calls a fawn a fawn and most folks I know call a magazine a magazine. The folks that call a "fawn" a "yearling" simply don't know what a "yearling" is.

It has nothing to do with "chastising" anyone to correct them.
Folks that call a "magazine" a "clip" probably call an "AR" and "assault rifle".
That kind of stuff helps the liberal gun grabbers kick their can down the road IMO.
 
I tote a 7.62x39 AR pretty often nowadays when I'm hunting in the thick woods. I don't look through my scope at you, though, unless you look pretty sketchy or you're on my land and ain't supposed to be. :)

You kill yearlings with fully automatic assault weapons with high capacity clips and silencers? Do you use those cop killer bullets too?
;)
 
I disagree.

Everyone I hunt with calls a fawn a fawn and most folks I know call a magazine a magazine. The folks that call a "fawn" a "yearling" simply don't know what a "yearling" is.

It has nothing to do with "chastising" anyone to correct them.
Folks that call a "magazine" a "clip" probably call an "AR" and "assault rifle".
That kind of stuff helps the liberal gun grabbers kick their can down the road IMO.
Then, all I can say is that you're in the very vast minority, and you let your book learnin' overcome your common sense. You still don't understand that the term yearling is traditionally used for "young of the year," not a year old. You're confounding it with a year old, which is not a yearling in any sense of the word used by 99% of human deer hunters. That's just a another deer. I know the scientifically correct terms for things, but I don't go around using them when they contradict the terms that everyone else I know uses, and have used for generations. Tradition trumps political correctness in my book. I know folks who went through Hades in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam who still call a thing to hold shells a "clip." I'm not gonna correct them. I know exactly what they're talking about.
 
You kill yearlings with fully automatic assault weapons with high capacity clips and silencers? Do you use those cop killer bullets too?
;)
Yep. :bounce:
 
Then, all I can say is that you're in the very vast minority, and you let your book learnin' overcome your common sense. You still don't understand that the term yearling is traditionally used for "young of the year," not a year old. You're confounding it with a year old, which is not a yearling in any sense of the word used by 99% of human deer hunters. That's just a another deer. I know the scientifically correct terms for things, but I don't go around using them when they contradict the terms that everyone else I know uses, and have used for generations. Tradition trumps political correctness in my book. I know folks who went through Hades in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam who still call a thing to hold shells a "clip." I'm not gonna correct them. I know exactly what they're talking about.
I don't think your 99% is anywhere close to correct but I'm wise enough to know I won't beat you in a popularity contest around here.

I will give you this, the reason everyone I know calls a fawn a fawn and a yearling a yearling is probably because I've corrected them in the past with some salty, but humorous, language. Lets just say I won't ever be invited to host the Academy Awards.

From the Google: Yearling (biology, zoology), an animal in its second year of life.
 
Numbers jumped up when TV turned everybody into Trophy hunting.
It was easy , just walk around in the woods and shoot Giant Bucks.
They didn't figure on getting their feet wet and it's cold too.
Now lot's of them are dropping out cause they were fed TV Wonders
 
I don't think your 99% is anywhere close to correct but I'm wise enough to know I won't beat you in a popularity contest around here.

I will give you this, the reason everyone I know calls a fawn a fawn and a yearling a yearling is probably because I've corrected them in the past with some salty, but humorous, language. Lets just say I won't ever be invited to host the Academy Awards.

From the Google: Yearling (biology, zoology), an animal in its second year of life.
So, everybody you know still calls this year's fawn in the fall a yearling like everybody else does, unless you're around, because they know you'll go all professor and lecture them with Google info that contradicts common usage that people have said for a couple hundred years? ::ke::bounce:

A fawn has spots. A yearling is a half-grown young of the year fawn in the fall after its spots are gone. According to almost everybody except Google. And Google has never been hunting. It's run by city slickers in California. :)

I'm just going by over half a century of life on earth, in which every single time I've ever heard someone refer to a "yearling," they were talking about a young of the YEAR.
 
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So, everybody you know still calls this year's fawn in the fall a yearling like everybody else does, unless you're around, because they know you'll go all professor and lecture them with Google info that contradicts common usage that people have said for a couple hundred years? ::ke::bounce:

A fawn has spots. A yearling is a half-grown young of the year fawn in the fall after its spots are gone. According to almost everybody except Google. And Google has never been hunting. It's run by city slickers in California. :)

I'm just going by over half a century of life on earth, in which every single time I've ever heard someone refer to a "yearling," they were talking about a young of the YEAR.

Sweet, I’m now a 1%er without having to join a motorcycle gang! I do hear about 60% of my fellow hunters down this way say “yearling” or actually “yurlin”, instead of the proper term, but I believe it’s because no one wants to say “I shot a doe fawn this morning”. Yurlin sure sounds bigger and better...
 
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