How do I identify the source of a gas leak?

Lonesome00

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
I just repaired our gas dryer and it works great now. However, I smell gas and that smell was not there before. It has a long flexible metal line coming from the wall into the washer. I think it is leaking some where in that line. I do not think it is coming form the fitting but I cannot be sure. I do not want to just start throwing parts at this thing. Although, I do think I should replace the flexible tubing.
 
#2
Spray bottle with soapy water.
 

cuda67bnl

Senior Member
#3
Yep, soapy water. Or a lighter..... ;-)
 
#8
The lighter sounds easier.
I had a buddy check for leaks in our Hunt camp Bus. It was converted into a kitchen/dinning area and we smelled gas around the gas stove. He light the lighter and put it down low and PUFF we were standing in a large circle of blue flame around our feet. It got exciting for a second.
 
#9
What's wrong with you people; he may take you serious?

If the lint catches on fire it's most likely going to burn down the house.

Whether they are kidding or not, NEVER check for ANY gas leaks with a lighter, match or anything with a flame or sparks unless you're prepared to get badly hurt, burnt, or kill in a fire or an explosion along with burning down the house.

Only use soapy water in a spray bottle and spray it on every fitting and gas line while there is pressure in the gas line.

When a leak is detected, repair it and spray everything again until no foamy suds appear anywhere in the line.
 
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#10
To be honest if the fix u did was on a mechanical part and not a gas part then you have prob made the gas leak yourself if the part was a gas part and you need to ask how to check for leaks then your not well versed i'n the gas business and need to find someone that is. There's alot of things that folks can fix themselves but those things that make fire and explosions y'all need to think about before you try to work on them.
 
#11
to be honest if the fix u did was on a mechanical part and not a gas part then you have prob made the gas leak yourself if the part was a gas part and you need to ask how to check for leaks then your not well versed i'n the gas business and need to find someone that is. There's alot of things that folks can fix themselves but those things that make fire and explosions y'all need to think about before you try to work on them.

yelp!!!
 
Thread starter #12
I replaced the fuse inside. When I did I cleaned every squre inch of that dryer. The fuzz and crud was caked everywhere. I had no idea it was that bad. The area around the flame had singed lint. Now, it looks new inside and I reworked the exhaust vent so it blows out straighter. The gas leak was coming from the old line that was way too long. I replaced it with a new yellow line that is just the right length. Now, no leaks and he dryers is worked a lot better.
 
#13
Glad it worked out for you. The yellow line is the one that should have been on it all along always use coated lines i'n places you can't see at all times. I've seen so many dangerous situations with gas i'n the past 27 or so years I have messed with it and even been involved i'n a few close calls and light injures and want my experience to help others be safe.
 
Thread starter #14
I did not grow up with the stuff. My first experiance with gas was after we moved up here. I am lost when it comes to dealing with the stuff.
 
Thread starter #16
I wanted to replace the old line anyway. However, there were no leakes at the fittings. I heard what sounds like a rupture in the line when I was moving it around. It was old and "felt" brittle (for a lack of a better term). So I am assuming it broke on one of the flex points.
 
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