how does an increase of 5lbs draw weight make a difference?

RipperIII

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
All things being equal, how much does a 5lb increase in draw weight effect the speed/flight characteristics of a given arrow? ....and is it significant for deer or hog hunting?
My bow is set now at 60lbs, I am brand new to this with no experience, I was thinking of going to 65lbs because 60lbs is very easy to draw and hold.
 
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duke13

Senior Member
#3
any change you make to your bow, arrows, broadheads, etc. will effect arrow flight. Always resight after any adjustments.
 
#5
The type of bow means more than anything.....if it's a Bear Whitetail II then it ain't gonna make a hill of beans.....if it's a new higher end bow, you could be looking at 3-4fps per pound, maybe more....i believe an X Force HF can get up to 5fps depending on draw length. Obviously it would affect arrow flight some, just like shooting a magnum caliber compared to a standard. As far as penetration on game, either would be sufficient, but more poundange means more speed, more speed with the same arrow translate into more kenetic energy, which means more penetration. Hope that helps. Next archery centered question....post it in the bowhunting forum, you'll get more helpful answers than you can imagine.
Kip
 

rjcruiser

Senior Member
#7
If you're comfortable with 60 lbs...and it is already shooting over 250 fps...I'd leave it. Plenty of speed to kill a deer. Shot placement is key, so if you can bump it up and still get the job done, bump it up. If it affects your accuracy, stick with 60.

Changes now....this close to season, might not be the best idea. Maybe wait until spring and then start adjusting it up a pound or two every week or two. Your muscles will grow and you'll never notice the difference.
 

rta47

Senior Member
#8
If you're comfortable with 60 lbs...and it is already shooting over 250 fps...I'd leave it. Plenty of speed to kill a deer. Shot placement is key, so if you can bump it up and still get the job done, bump it up. If it affects your accuracy, stick with 60.
My thought exactly. Why change if you are shooting well:confused:?
 

RipperIII

Senior Member
Thread starter #10
Matthews drenaline, I do shoot it very well, but being a rookie, I was curious to know if there is a credible improvement in "pass through" or flat trajectory performance with a heavier draw weight?
 

rjcruiser

Senior Member
#11
Well...seeing that it is a mathews and not a bowtech, you'll probably need to bump that poundage up a bit to get the speed you need..j/k:bounce::bounce:

You're plenty fast at 60 lbs. Keep it where you are comfortable. Shot placement is the key...you've got plenty of speed.
 
#12
1 pound of draw weight will equal roughly 1.5 fps
5 grains of arrow weight will also equal roughly 1.5 fps
 
#13
If you can shoot 65lbs easily and your arrows are suitable for the adjustment, then I would bump it up...More speed means less drop, and this is a big help if you make a mistake and slightly misjudge distance.
As far as resighting after the adjustment, that will be easy. I wouldn't worry about that.
 
#14
First and fore most as you up the poundage you will require a stiffer dynsmic spined arrow. As you raise the poundage walk back tune it to make sure you are not out ofspine range. you willknow because your arrows with broadheads will not group with field point and will start to track to the right on a right handed bow because you arrows spine stays the same while the required spine goes up.

here is a chart to help explain this.
 
#15
Just don't forget you probably won't be hunting in a t-shirt in 40 degree December weather. I have my bow set at a lower poundage so I can draw it and shoot comfortably while staying toasty. Practice in what you are hunting in.
 
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