HOW TO KEEP FLY ON TOP

Thread starter #1

FARMS100

Senior Member
I would like to know if you use something other than the $5-6 dollar stuff. I think you can use CRISCO
to keep them on top of water.
AL
 

pjciii

Senior Member
I would not use the stuff you fried fish in. Maybe fry up some worms and use that. My grandfather would probably have said it would work just fine.

Patrick
 

flyrod444

Senior Member
When a dry becomes soaked using a bounty paper towel, one can squeeze the water out. They don't call it the quicker picker upper for nothing. Then use a little qink and your good to go. The quality of the hackle and quantity of hackle help make a dry float. The best tied fly will not float well if poor quality hackle is used. Look for dries that have stiff hackles with little to no fuzz on the hackle near the hook or bottom of the hackle fibers. A fly that has sparse hackles dosn't float as well either. Most commercially tied flies don't have a lot of hackle on them so I always look through them for the best and most hackle. Bodies made of deer or elk hair are great floaters as well since the hair of these are hollow and help them to float.
 
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1. Flies tied with quality hackle.
2. Work a thin coat of Gink into it before you make the first cast.
3. After you catch a few fish, clean it, dry it, and shake it in some powder dessicant, re-Gink as necessary.
4. Don't let your fly drag. Keep as much line off the water as possible.

Crisco, no. Just get the Gink. You will spend more on gas to drive to the creek to fish one time that you will spend on enough Gink and dessicant to last you all season and then some. And your life will be happier. I fly fish a lot. A bottle of Gink will usually last me all year, sometimes longer. I spend half that much on a biscuit to eat on the way to the creek.
 
Thread starter #6

FARMS100

Senior Member
I got the answer I was expecting, I heard a while back that the CRISCO would work
so I was asking have a 3#can at the house. I have some gink in my vest to use.
I asked a few questions on here and got what I want answers!
Thanks ---AL
 

fishndoc

Senior Member
Keeping a dry fly floating starts with a good quality fly. I’m not very picky about nymphs as long as the hook is sharp, but I’ll splurge on good dry flies. Caylor Custom flies is a good source, as well as most fly shops, if you don’t tie your own.
I like Dave Whitlock's floatant for greasing up the fly before first cast, once it gets wet I’ll squeeze out excess and dry shake.

Remember, the most important parts of your tackle are the ones closest to the fish: your fly, tippet, leader, fly line, in that order
 

jigman29

Senior Member
look up the floatant that uses white gas and paraffin wax. I made a batch a few years ago and it's the best stuff I have ever used. The gas evaporates and leaves the wax and it's amazing how well they float.
I would share the recipe but I haven't made it in so long I can't remember it.
 
look up the floatant that uses white gas and paraffin wax. I made a batch a few years ago and it's the best stuff I have ever used. The gas evaporates and leaves the wax and it's amazing how well they float.
I would share the recipe but I haven't made it in so long I can't remember it.
I tried something like that years ago from a recipe I read in a book somewhere. Best I can remember, it floated the flies well, but there would be an oil slick around them on the water.
 
Atlanta Fly Fishing School sells some powder floatant that is very good. Gink will also work. Be sure you are getting a good mend to keep line tension off the fly.
 
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