I'm sad....NOT ANY MORE!

Thread starter #1

leoparddog

Senior Member
I had planned on buying a flintlock long rifle this past spring to hunt with this fall but financial road blocks kept getting in my way. Now the season is almost here and there will be no spark, boom, meat for me.

All is not completely lost, I'll take my percussion Hawkens to the woods and with some luck put some meat in the freezer. Just really wanted a flintlock for this season.
 
Last edited:

Darkhorse

Senior Member
My advice is to enjoy your percussion during this deer season. Then as soon as possible get that flintlock and begin shooting it. For the best results you need to really get to know your rifle and this doesn't happen overnight.
Have you made your choice for your flintlock?
 
Thread starter #3

leoparddog

Senior Member
I had entertained the thought of getting a kit from Chambers and doing it myself, but given the cost of the parts, I've decided to find someone to assemble it for me - an Isaac Haines in .54 caliber. I've made some connections this year via the CLA on Facebook with some gunsmiths who can do the work. A little more money invested but I'll end up with a nicer rifle. I'm going to keep it fairly plain.
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
That's the way to do it...start with the best.

But check out your gunsmith real good. A buddy of mine contracted with a gunmaker he met at an arts and crafts fair. The guy said all the right things I guess cause my buddy just plunked down his money.
His rifle ended up being a piece of c***! He brought me the rifle to tune the lock as the trigger pull was gritty and real heavy. I took the lock out and the inside was almost rusted beyond saving. Just a couple of weeks from the builder.
I told him to send it back to the builder. There was other things wrong with the rifle too.
I don't know Tom Watson but if Muldoon recommends him then I'd check him out.
 
Rifle Builder

That's the way to do it...start with the best.

But check out your gunsmith real good. A buddy of mine contracted with a gunmaker he met at an arts and crafts fair. The guy said all the right things I guess cause my buddy just plunked down his money.
His rifle ended up being a piece of c***! He brought me the rifle to tune the lock as the trigger pull was gritty and real heavy. I took the lock out and the inside was almost rusted beyond saving. Just a couple of weeks from the builder.
I told him to send it back to the builder. There was other things wrong with the rifle too.
I don't know Tom Watson but if Muldoon recommends him then I'd check him out.
Tom is from Georgia; builds excellent ML and has been so for over 40 years. His son is also building now and based upon Tom's ethical bearing I'd venture to say...."Like father....like son!" I purchased a flintlock from Tom couple years ago and the quality of work is excellent and the rifle is a proverbial tack-driver of .50 caliber!:fine::flag:
 
Thread starter #7

leoparddog

Senior Member
I put in my order tonight for a Late Lancaster kit from TVM! I don't know when it will arrive yet, but I'm looking forward to building my own first flintlock rifle.

I'd like to pay someone to build it for me, but that really just puts it out of financial reach at least right now.

Also in the long run, by the time I spent $1600+ on a build rifle, It will become a safe queen.
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
Leaporddog, There are 2 options I strongly recommend and it's not to late to add them.
The first and to me, most important is upgrading to a swamped barrel over the straight barrel. This will really make the rifle balance much better. In fact I bet you will be amazed at how the rifle will feel in your hands. I would go with a Colerain barrel. I have both a Colerain and Rice and find the Colerain to be just as accurate if not more so. This upgrade will really make it feel like a custom rifle.
The second one is, I would think about upgrading your wood at least one level. A maple stock with figure can be a beautiful thing to look at.
Good luck on that build.
 
Thread starter #9

leoparddog

Senior Member
Thanks Darkhorse.
I did get the swamped barrel. Not sure if I'm getting a Colerain or a Rice though. I also upgraded to the Premium + stock.

I ordered the kit from TVM. I'll give them a call this week and ask about the barrel mfg.

I really wanted to get a Chambers kit, but I felt like I needed some of the metal work done for me. Only a couple of the kit sellers do the metal work for a reasonable add on price.
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
Don't get me wrong a Rice barrel is considered by many to be much better than the Colraine, it also cost more. My Rice is a .40 caliber and it will shoot those one-hole groups if I do my part.
I hear you about getting some of that metal work done for you. Wise move for a first time build.
Try to study up on the architecture of original longrifles, especially the forend. A mistake I made on my first was not getting it round enough or thin enough where it meets the barrel.
 

SASS249

Senior Member
Try to study up on the architecture of original longrifles, especially the forend. A mistake I made on my first was not getting it round enough or thin enough where it meets the barrel.
Second what Darkhorse said. The mistake almost all first time builders (myself included) make is not realizing just how little wood is actually in the forend of a longrifle. Building a good serviceable rifle is not rocket science. Taking your time, you will end up with something you will forever be proud of. One thing I tell folks and absolutely practice myself (although I build more boats these days than rifles) is that if you find yourself working on something and say "that's good enough", STOP. It is never "good enough". usually this means you are tired etc and need to walk away take a break and start fresh.
 
Thread starter #12

leoparddog

Senior Member
Second what Darkhorse said. The mistake almost all first time builders (myself included) make is not realizing just how little wood is actually in the forend of a longrifle. Building a good serviceable rifle is not rocket science. Taking your time, you will end up with something you will forever be proud of. One thing I tell folks and absolutely practice myself (although I build more boats these days than rifles) is that if you find yourself working on something and say "that's good enough", STOP. It is never "good enough". usually this means you are tired etc and need to walk away take a break and start fresh.
Thanks guys. Its been almost a year since I got on this "I want a flintlock longrifle" project. Thank you Bert for letting me handle your IH last year and yes I was surprised at how little wood there is up front. I spent a lot of time last year buying chisels and stones and smaller tools and still don't have a drill press.

I guess that is my next hurdle, to buy a new or used drill press as I don't trust myself to freehand drill and keep it all square and true.

I'm telling myself not to rush this. I have lots to do before I pick up the first chisel or rasp to get my work area ready.
 
Top