Is there really a second peak gobbling period?

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GAHUNTER60

Senior Member
If there is, I keep missing it!

It seems to me that the woods fall silent after about the first ten days of April, and stay that way until the end of the season, except for roost gobbling. Just when is this second peak in middle Georgia?

(Confession: I should admit that my late season experience is rather sparse. As the seed tick population increases with the heat and humidity, my desire to sit among them decreases.)
 
Last year I heard lots of gobbles during week 2 but this year nothing (never seem to make it out opening week). And I hunted both middle GA and north GA. I added a "Gobble Map" app to my phone and several reports are the same...All quiet or roost gobbles only. But then I look on here and see folks holding up big Toms. Hmm. Next year I'm gonna just take a week off and go every day. I think the turkeys have a calendar and avoid strutting on the weekends. Ha Ha.
 

rhbama3

Administrator
I don't know about a second "peak" for gobbling, but have seen and read about hen's "starting over" when their first clutch gets destroyed.
 

T-N-T

Senior Member
Maybe it's yalls calling?::ke:::ke:
 

Beagler282

Senior Member
They seem to get real vocal around the house after April 15th when hens start hitting the nest.
 
They seem to have a 2nd and 3rd peak here, our season don't open until the 2 nd phase , some years 3rd. Depending on how weather is.
 
Well what does it mean when toms gobble in the fall and winter? I've heard drastic gobbling activity from one day to next during turkey season also. Super hot one day dead silence the next.
 
With increasing turkey populations and increasing nest predators I think the second gobbling peak is more subdued.. It exists but not at the level alot of literature leads you to believe.
 
Lots of factors. Not to mention some of the birds have been killed.

It has been my experience over 45 years that a boss gobbler does not have to gobble to mate every available hen in his woods.

He will gobble on perfect mornings and he lets no mistake you make go without an adverse effect.
(walks away making you think he is interested but that is not the case).

It is more important late season to walk quietly in the woods and without giving up your position than any other time.

He lives because you make mistakes.

s&r
 

Garnto88

Senior Member
Lots of factors. Not to mention some of the birds have been killed.

It has been my experience over 45 years that a boss gobbler does not have to gobble to mate every available hen in his woods.

He will gobble on perfect mornings and he lets no mistake you make go without an adverse effect.
(walks away making you think he is interested but that is not the case).

It is more important late season to walk quietly in the woods and without giving up your position than any other time.

He lives because you make mistakes.




s&r
I fully agree. Best thing I read on here in a long time. I can prove this from events of the last two days. I have had two big gobblers for two consecutive days strut with hens around me for 4 hrs each day and never gobbled other than at my calls. Never said a word from roost. I'm convinced probably would not have gobbled if I were not in the picture. I haven't killed them yet but will stay with them until I catch them alone or inctercept that flock of ladies.. I've been hunting for 40 years too and you hit náil on head.. Some boss gobblers never gobble..
 
This is the data I collected during the 2014 season. Now granted, this is just my individual data and this does not represent Georgia or my area as a whole.

When looking at the chart that relates pressure and gobbling activity, in all cases when pressure decreased in the 12 hour period prior to the hunt, gobbling activity was below average for both roost and ground gobbling.

When pressure increased more than .10 in the 12 hour period prior to the hunt, ground gobbling activity was below average 100% of hunts and roost gobbling activity was below average 66% of hunts.

When pressure change fell between 0 and .09, roost gobbling activity was above average 75% of hunts and ground gobbling activity was above average 100% of hunts.

Now looking at the graph that looks at just gobbling activity, my first peak in gobbling activity was from April 5-April 11th and the 2nd peak in gobbling activity was from April 21st-April 27th. The straight lines on the graph represent the ground (red) gobbling activity and roost (blue) gobbling activity.

You can take it for what is worth, but this season, I personally believe that turkey season is just getting started as we still have birds in HUGE bachelor groups. But I have usually noticed 1st and 2nd peaks in gobbling activity with a lull in between where it is the height of mating.
 

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