Its that time of year... Parvo....

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
In another conversation on another forum Parvo is being discussed. An affected youngster basically infected an entire litter and the mother too.

This is worth discussion, and I hope no one here is having problems this year. I worked for a veterinarian for several years and have seen what this awful virus can do... To me, it is essential to have your veterinarian involved, and it is not cheap to treat, or to disinfect the area.

Bleach does kill the virus. That's not bad in the kennel and maybe even in the yard, but in the house, it would be an interesting problem... but it has to be done. The virus lives a long time in the environment.

I have done, and still do on very limited basis, some rescue, but those dogs are not ever in contact with my dogs for any reason. I will not bring this into my yard/kennel/house if I have any control.

I bleach my kennels regularly too, just in case.... where there is fecal matter and even uneaten food, there is bacteria and viruses like that too. So, bleach. Dogs are not on dirt. Kennels and drains rinsed at least once a day. Good ole powdered lime is used in dirt areas that I have to clean.

I NEVER use vaccinations from the feed stores, but if you do, keep in mind that shipping vaccinations matters. Did your feed store have the vaccinations shipped in cooled containers and are they kept refrigerated properly? That's how to keep them fresh. When I order from my supplier, I pay the extra for overnite shipping and for dry ice and a cooler to ship in and they are kept in a good refrigerator. It has been worth the extra cost.

Here is a bit of what my reaction to the parvo virus was on the other conversation. And, I hope if any of our veterinarians are reading, that they might comment. The more we know, the safer our kennels are :) I am only attempting to be helpful here...

"Parvo is easy for pups to get. It should be treated by a veterinarian, and the treatment is not cheap. A litter of pups would be cost ineffective.... but it is not seen often in kennels that are kept very clean, where unvaccinated/unknown pups are kept out, and where vaccinations are handled properly. Vaccinations from the feed store, or not shipped properly are probably ineffective, or weakened. Once the virus is in your area/kennel/home, it takes a lot of real work to get rid of it. It can live in the ground for a year or more.... It is harder for adults to get it, but it is not unheard of in younger adults.... that is why I asked the age of the mother.

Lots of fluids and time and maybe some home remedies and the dogs may survive. By the time symptons are seen, the damage in the intestinal tract is already done. Treatment is support and some other veterinary decisions until the virus runs its course.

During the time I worked for a veterinarian, only a strong bleach solution was trusted to kill the virus to keep the hospital area safe for all dogs.

As to what can be done... LOTS of fluids, electrolytes, etc until stools are firm and pups/dogs can eat without vomiting. GET YOUR VETERINARIAN INVOLVED."
 
#2
Parvo

is a real killer. I was around when it first showed up in late 70s early 80s. No vaccines existed vets resorted to giving cat distemper shots to dogs in an effort to save dogs.
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #3
It sure is bad!! I did not know about Parvo back then, but I have seen so many with it. Some looked pretty good, and died anyhow, and I can remember one little dog that just hung on and hung on, extremely sick, but he made it thru and survived it. I think it took him about 2 weeks on fluids and he was pitiful. But he bounced back, finally... His owners just would not give up and neither did he, so the doctors just kept on working with him...

Julia
 
#4
Julia, when parvo first showed up it killed healthy dogs in very short time and you are correct about the stuff staying on and on. The thing I could never understand were the muts that never came down with it. I have seen folks loose whole kennels full of pure bred dogs and the mut down the street would never miss a lick. Poor old dogs were half fed never had a shot and sometimes I felt like you could shoot one with a 3006 and they would just limp off and a couple of days later that same dog would be out chasing cars and never miss a beat. But a pure bred dog would get a sniff of parvo and be dead in 24 hours. I have smelled my share of half digested blood from the stools. It is an awful way for any dog to die. Take your dog to the vet and get him shoots.
 

Mistrfish

Senior Member
#5
I hate Parvo, you can do everything right and still loose them. We lost 5 pups out 6 to Parvo last summer. Wife works at a vet clinic and had a puppy come in right at closing time, she handled the pup for 2 min and came home. Didn't know it had parvo. 4 days later all 6 came down with it, we worked 24/7 trying to save the litter. Kept the one that lived ,he could have problems when he gets older. Now she changes cloths and sprays her shoes with bleach before she comes home. That was a $9000 dollars lesson.
 
#6
It is so easy to prevent.... vaccinate starting at 6 weeks and every 3 weeks until 16 weeks old with a good vaccine and it will not be an issue. Vaccinate the - I AM A POTTY MOUTH -- I AM A POTTY MOUTH -- I AM A POTTY MOUTH -- I AM A POTTY MOUTH -- I AM A POTTY MOUTH - shortly before breeding season so she passes the protection in her colostrum. Keep the pets wormed and on good food so they have the basis for a good immune system and intesti all health.

Don't bring pets into an area that have been contaminated until they are fully vaccinated.

Don't let a potential client visit your puppies after they have been at other kennels or shelters.

Avoid pet smart and dog parks with that new puppy until it is fully vaccinated..no matter how much the kids beg and how much you want to show him off.

I have raised several puppies in my clinic with parvo coming and going all the time. I have never had an issue if the mother was vaccinated before breeding and the pup was kept vaccinated.

Please prevent this! I hate treating it.
 

Doc Olly

Senior Member
#7
Parvoviral enteritis is deadly, very deadly. Please prevent this with the necessary shot at the appropriate time. 6,8 and 12 weeks of age. No dog parks or other area heavily populated with dogs. If your dog does get it, it may die despite aggressive therapy from your vet!
I am NOT a fan of feed store vaccines either.

For those if your dealing with it now I usually recommend aggressive IV fluids, IV antibiotics, IV anti vomiting and IV anti diarrheals. I also use human Tamiflu.
Tamiflu is an antiviral used by MD or human dice for flu. It's not cheap and controversial to human doc and vets. One problem is its given by mouth and if the chuff or dog is vomiting its pointless. Also studies showed that Tamiflu only lessens the clinical signs by one day but when I prescribe it it works.

Bottom line, like our grandmothers taught us, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound if cure"!!!!!!!!
Prevent this instead if trying to treat it!!!!

Good thread for us dog lovers!
 
#8
I have tried Tamiflu, but I honestly don't have a large enough N to be able to tell if it worked or not. I do think that EARLY intervention, especially if I use Tamiflu, is a huge factor.

Like you, I am not a fan of feed store vaccines. We see too many that have parvo in spite of having had the vaccines regularly. In some cases, they were good quality vaccines that I suspect were mishandled and left on a loading dock somewhere.

Have you seen a change in the severity of parvo recently? It just seems like we are seeing a change in the severity of symptoms this last year or so. It also seems that I am seeing more adult dogs with it again.




Parvoviral enteritis is deadly, very deadly. Please prevent this with the necessary shot at the appropriate time. 6,8 and 12 weeks of age. No dog parks or other area heavily populated with dogs. If your dog does get it, it may die despite aggressive therapy from your vet!
I am NOT a fan of feed store vaccines either.

For those if your dealing with it now I usually recommend aggressive IV fluids, IV antibiotics, IV anti vomiting and IV anti diarrheals. I also use human Tamiflu.
Tamiflu is an antiviral used by MD or human dice for flu. It's not cheap and controversial to human doc and vets. One problem is its given by mouth and if the chuff or dog is vomiting its pointless. Also studies showed that Tamiflu only lessens the clinical signs by one day but when I prescribe it it works.

Bottom line, like our grandmothers taught us, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound if cure"!!!!!!!!
Prevent this instead if trying to treat it!!!!

Good thread for us dog lovers!
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #9
This is indeed a good conversation and I am learning from you guys :)

I learned from my vet the importance of DA2PPV shots every 3 weeks from 6 - 15 or 16 weeks... and I have seen more Parvo than I ever want to see again while working at a clinic. It is sad, and often times people with sick puppies don't have the needed $$ to save those pups either.

But, I also learned to be cautious about how the vaccine is handled. Refrigerated shipments, kept refrigerated when at my place, and only taken out to give the shots. Never left on the counter or in the car, etc. because the vaccine loses its potency if not handled well. Am I correct?

And vaccine given under the skin, not IM?

Here is what I usually purchase, with soft sided cooler and Ice Pack

http://www.jefferspet.com/nobivac-canine-1-dappv/camid/PET/cp/SH-GJ/cn/10025/

Julia
 

Doc Olly

Senior Member
#10
Parvo

Red man- I have noticed parvo being more aggressive! Must be a different strain.

Julia- I give all vaccines under the skin or subcutaneous.
Feel free to ask me anything. I love dogs, especially coonhounds!
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #11
Thanks Doc Olly :)
 
#12
Sounds like just about everything has been covered! Good advice all the way around in this thread!

I would add that when cleaning kennels, any vomit/food/feces/etc. should be scooped out before chlorox is applied, as organic material inactivates chlorox.

I would also add that while Parvo is more common in the spring and summer, it can occur at any time of year.

Vaccine handling is very important, as well as using a quality vaccine and administering it appropriately.
 
#13
Great thread, and thanks to all!

Julia, ol' Red is thriving.....still a good natured, good looking dog, and healthy thanks to you.He looks the same as when you gave him to me, only three times the size.....about 50 pounds.
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #14
Hi crackerdave and Red! :)

I am so glad... if you are ever over this way, give us a holler and stop by! :)

Julia
 
#16
Good post, my bluetick pup died earlier this year from parvo and shortly after my chocolate lab got it. She survived though. Its horrible, wouldnt wish it on my worst enemies (dogs), Racked up some vet bills as well..
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #17
Very sorry for your loss, but glad the lab survived .... it is a tragic and sad disease and often so very expensive to treat.



Good post, my bluetick pup died earlier this year from parvo and shortly after my chocolate lab got it. She survived though. Its horrible, wouldnt wish it on my worst enemies (dogs), Racked up some vet bills as well..
 
#18
Good post, my bluetick pup died earlier this year from parvo and shortly after my chocolate lab got it. She survived though. Its horrible, wouldnt wish it on my worst enemies (dogs), Racked up some vet bills as well..
Is your Chocolate Lab an adult dog? :huh:

The reason I ask is because I make SURE my Lab gets a booster once a year. Im asking myself what is the point of this booster if an adult dog can still catch the virus even though they have had the shot?
 

JuliaH

Senior Member
Thread starter #19
Parvo is not age specific, but normally you see it in puppies and young adults.

Sometimes unvaccinated, sometimes unsanitary conditions, sometimes coming in contact with the virus at places where other dogs gather. Cannot trust that everyone vaccinates with the same care we do....

I know of one case where a family brought a beautiful pup to a competition.... some days later, dogs came down with it... the couple had just picked up their pup from the vet (they told someone) after being treated for Parvo and they did not know the pup was still shedding the virus.... dogs died from that couple holding the pup and petting others.

It's sorta like how easy it is to spread the cold virus for us... but Parvo is deadly.

(I'm not a vet, just have worked for vets and have seen too much of it. A veterinarian told me once the oldest dog they had seen Parvo positive was 4 years.)

Julia

Is your Chocolate Lab an adult dog? :huh:

The reason I ask is because I make SURE my Lab gets a booster once a year. Im asking myself what is the point of this booster if an adult dog can still catch the virus even though they have had the shot?
 
#20
Im VERY familiar with the virus. I almost lost a Rottie pup years ago to this terrible thing that is Parvo. It cost me a fortune to have him treated. Luckily he survived though.

Im just kind of worried now. I will have my Lab vaccinated yearly against Parvo. She lives inside in a very clean environment and there no other dogs around,. Am I now to believe that she can STILL get Parvo?

Thats what Im asking :) :flag: She will be two in November.
 
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