Liquid lime

Thread starter #1
This is for all the farmers out there. I need to lime. I have seen the ads for the liquid lime that advertise they are about 20/ac.
https://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/grq/d/why-use-lime-when-bioliquid/6337874521.html
Doesn't say how much lime this translates to. My question is about applying it. Do y'all see results faster? Does it last any longer/shorter? Better overall than having it spread as pellets or powder? My feed/seed said he can spread lime for 65/ton (if memory is right)
I need to lime about 5ac total. I haven't done my soil test yet but I did lime about 4 years ago so hopefully wont be too bad. I am planning on killing everything in the spring and planting a seeded Bermuda for pasture grazing. Also planning on doing some sub soiling to allow better water absorption.
Thoughts?
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
I think if you apply it to your lawn, you might see a short lived benefit, but it's claims just don't hold up for the long term. We used to have a "guy" on here trying to push Solu-Cal, which sounds very similar, with similar claims and refers to a Rutgers study, but when you go to the Rutgers Study (page 5), Solu-Cal did not preform as well as simple lime.

http://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/plantandpestadvisory/2006/ln0406.pdf

2 gallons = one ton of lime? Hmmmmmm .... wished I could believe it!

Maybe others who have used it can share their experience. My money would be on the AG lime, however more expensive.
 

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jimbo4116

Retired Moderator
I think if you apply it to your lawn, you might see a short lived benefit, but it's claims just don't hold up for the long term. We used to have a "guy" on here trying to push Solu-Cal, which sounds very similar, with similar claims and refers to a Rutgers study, but when you go to the Rutgers Study (page 5), Solu-Cal did not preform as well as simple lime.

http://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/plantandpestadvisory/2006/ln0406.pdf

2 gallons = one ton of lime? Hmmmmmm .... wished I could believe it!

Maybe others who have used it can share their experience. My money would be on the AG lime, however more expensive.
Liquid Calcium products are becoming a standard application on fruit and vegetables crops. These applications are most often done foliar or with fertiligation injections into drip tape rather than topical soil applications. And have been shown to dramatically effect the calcium content in the tissue of target plants. Which is a different measure of efficacy than testing the soil for ph levels.

Not sure that liquid Calcium emulsions are the best avenue for food plots where dollar and cents returns are not really the way success is quantified.

No, I am not an agronomist, but my son is. He will tell you it is hard to promote and sell a product that does not work, but you also must understand what the product is designed to do.
 

Ihunt

Senior Member
It will also burn up a pump. It's designed for much larger pumps than what you probably have.
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
I think if you apply it to your lawn, you might see a short lived benefit, but it's claims just don't hold up for the long term. We used to have a "guy" on here trying to push Solu-Cal, which sounds very similar, with similar claims and refers to a Rutgers study, but when you go to the Rutgers Study (page 5), Solu-Cal did not preform as well as simple lime.

http://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/plantandpestadvisory/2006/ln0406.pdf

2 gallons = one ton of lime? Hmmmmmm .... wished I could believe it!

Maybe others who have used it can share their experience. My money would be on the AG lime, however more expensive.
Wonder if he ever got paroled?
This stuff works fast but it also has a short life usage. Turtle vs hare type thing.
I will stay with what I know works until someone can show me the long term total costs to change to liquid on my huge 3.5 acre food plot.
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
Wonder if he ever got paroled?
This stuff works fast but it also has a short life usage. Turtle vs hare type thing.
I will stay with what I know works until someone can show me the long term total costs to change to liquid on my huge 3.5 acre food plot.
LOL, yeah, I wonder if he ever did! Have never seen him pop up anywhere else. He might be breaking big limestone rocks into lime for us right now!

Yeah, I am sure that liquid lime has lots of good applications, in drip irrigation, strip till applications .... foliar applications, etc., but it's just not the right product to use (thanks doomtrp), for "us" food plotters, trying to bring the soil ph up.

The Craigslist ad sends chills up my spine, with the claims it makes, trying to separate us from our hard earned money, but alas ......
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
Yeah, in particular since you're going to convert it into a Bermuda (long term) pasture, get the soil right with the lime worked in, then for future applications you can just broadcast over top.
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
If you limed 4 years ago, your soil test will show you that your ph has headed back down, but you might get away with just one truck load!
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
Bermuda doesn't need as high a ph as clover,brassicas etc....
So you might not need as much as you think.Depending on soil type etc.....
Also go with the extension service on this soil test,we forget to mention the micro nutrients
 
Thread starter #12
How do you get the micro nutrients? I have always just bought "super rainbow" fertilizer. Usually 16-4-8 slower release.
Would a fertilizer guy be better?
 

Ihunt

Senior Member
How do you get the micro nutrients? I have always just bought "super rainbow" fertilizer. Usually 16-4-8 slower release.
Would a fertilizer guy be better?
Southern States has their own blend that has a lot of micro nutrients in it. They just got bought out so look for a name change.
 
Southern States has their own blend that has a lot of micro nutrients in it. They just got bought out so look for a name change.
It will be Agrium so the fertilizer will be super rainbow. Cargill and land O'lake's split the divisions but agrium bought out all southern state dealers in Ga and fl.
 
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